It doesn't even deserve the name "Pro".

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Blackberryroid, Sep 9, 2012.

  1. Blackberryroid, Sep 9, 2012
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2012

    Blackberryroid macrumors 6502a

    Blackberryroid

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    #1
    Let's take a nice good look at the MacBook Pro 13-Inch.
    And let me just highlight a part of it's name, "Pro".

    But before we get to that, let's look at it's specs:
    2.5GHz dual-core Intel Core i5
    Turbo Boost up to 3.1GHz
    4GB 1600MHz memory
    500GB 5400-rpm hard drive
    Intel HD Graphics 4000
    Built-in battery (7 hours)

    It has no dedicated graphics card, and no quad core CPU, and it isn't i7 as standard.

    This device is supposed to be running intense tasks, such as rendering at Final Cut Pro, Motion graphics at AE and Motion, audio mixing at Logic Pro, and so much more.

    It can run those apps, but it isn't fast enough. It can't even run modern games at extreme graphic settings and maintain a 30 FPS or above.

    I think this is no way a "Pro" computer and it doesn't deserve the name "MacBook Pro".

    What do you think?
     
  2. simsaladimbamba

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    #2
    It has been discussed before ad nausea and the consensus is, that the "Pro" moniker is for marketing reasons, to have it distinguished from the MacBook Air and MacBook (which of course has been discontinued).
    The resolution alone should be a clear indication, that running FCP X or Motion or any other "professional" application with lots of windows or palettes is abysmal on that machine. Even the 1440 x 900 pixel on a 15" MBP is not enough, at least for me.
     
  3. Fuchal macrumors 68020

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    #3
    Not every professional runs Final Cut Pro or plays games all day.
     
  4. Blackberryroid thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Blackberryroid

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    #4
    Yes, but it is similar to that. Who knows, maybe making an OS or virtualizing 7 different Linux OS, or something that requires a real Pro computer. The 13 Inch can't satisfy their needs.
     
  5. bogatyr macrumors 65816

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    #5
    No Pro laptop is going to fit every professional's needs. Each person has their own requirements and that is why they have different models.

    By the way, you can run several VMs on the MBP 13" without issue. I ran 4 regularly on last years model (16GB of RAM though).
     
  6. grapes911 Moderator emeritus

    grapes911

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    #6
    Absolutely. Some professionals are on the road all the time and need a compact machine for travel. Some need to balance power and weight/size. Some need the most powerful computer ever built. Professionals come in a shapes and sizes. My 13" MBP is perfect for me. It runs VMs, Photoshop, and everything else I need.
     
  7. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #7
    The 13" was originally launched as the "Aluminium MacBook" it was merged with the "Pro" lineup to streamline the range of that day. Today in 2012 the 13" MBP is a capable machine in it`s own right, although it doesn't meet my own needs. At the end of the day it`s the usage that defines the professional not the hardware.

    Personally i would not be surprised once all the portables are Retina if Apple drops the "Pro" moniker and quietly returns back to "MacBook" as a cleaner more elegant approach has always been Apple`s way. I have used 15" MacBook Pro`s since they were first marketed and still have three generations in the house. The new Retina drops Apple`s ubiquitous "MacBooK Pro" label from the bezel and i for one prefer this cleaner look. It has been stated the due to the new Retina display there is no space, looking at my "Classic" pre Unibody Early 2008 15" MBP the visible space at the bottom of the display is pretty much the same. If Apple wanted to label the Retina they would, as with many of their product less is more ;)
     
  8. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    #8
    I have 3 VM's running on my 2009 MBP 13" right now.

    It's long in the tooth with a core 2 duo, but come on guy, wtf are you even talking about? Virtualization is the not beast it was 5+ years ago.
     
  9. talmy macrumors 601

    talmy

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    #9
    I used my 13" Aluminum MacBook (which became the "Pro") professionally for three years. I used a White MacBook before that. The "Pro" designation has no meaning. Non-"Pro" Macs can be used professionally and "Pro" Macs can be used non-professionally.
     
  10. CausticPuppy, Sep 9, 2012
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2012

    CausticPuppy macrumors 65816

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    #10
    How many quad-core discrete-GPU notebooks are there on the market?
    (Edit - referring to 13" and less)
     
  11. AZREOSpecialist macrumors 68000

    AZREOSpecialist

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    #11
    After reading your original post, I still don't understand the point of this thread. So the 13" MacBook Pro doesn't meet your needs. Okay, well then get something different. What's the purpose behind discussing Apple's product naming conventions when nothing we say here is going to matter to Apple? Seems like a waste of time.
     
  12. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #12
    Exactly and this is why i believe Apple will drop the designation in time, preferring to differentiate with terms such as Retina & Air, even if "Pro" is kept it will be less focused on as with the present Retina. The naming convention of MacBook Pro does now seem rather cliched, not by any means that the systems are not suitable for professorial use, however just like the 80`s there was a time and a place...

    The one exception of course the MacPro for obvious reasons.
     
  13. M5RahuL macrumors 68020

    M5RahuL

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    #13
    The 13" was/ is a very capable machine. Upgraded to 16GB RAM, I ran 4 VMs all day long without a hiccup (2011 13" i5).

    I think the new names, dropping the PRO, could be :

    Retina Mac or,
    Macbook Retina

    And, then you have the MBA, iMac, Mac Pro, and Mac Mini.
     
  14. Adidas Addict macrumors 65816

    Adidas Addict

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  15. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #15
    First, I think you should search the forum before posting, as this topic has been beaten to death over the years in dozens of threads, such as these:

    Macbook PRO needs a name change "Consumer"
    Should Apple consider rebranding its notebook lineup?

    This thread won't add anything that hasn't already been said.

    Second, as already stated, "Pro" is a marketing term and in no way indicates the capabilities of the computer or the profession of the user.
    • There are doctors, lawyers, etc. (who are professionals) who are completely computer illiterate or who don't even own computers.
    • There are landscapers, laborers, janitors, etc. who are extremely computer literate and have high demands for the computers they own.

    A Ford Mustang isn't really a horse.
    A BlackBerry isn't really a berry.
    Facebook isn't really a book.
    This isn't really a fruit: 

    Marketing names frequently don't accurately describe the product they're assigned to. Get over it!
     
  16. NutsNGum macrumors 68030

    NutsNGum

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  17. Comeagain? macrumors 68020

    Comeagain?

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    #17
    While we're at it, can we discuss what makes someone a "Pro" too? It's been a while, and we haven't quite beat that dead horse enough yet.
     
  18. thedarkhorse macrumors 6502a

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    #18
    hundreds? thousands? quad cores have been in laptops for a while now, there's tons of windows laptops out there with quad core+dedicated gpu(and many for much less $ than a 13" mbp, but that's another discussion).

    But really it's just a 3 letter word, and at this point with no standard "macbook" it is just to identify it differently from the air.
     
  19. Blackberryroid thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Blackberryroid

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    #19
    Yes, but the objective of a Pro laptop is to be able to satisfy as much professionals as possible.

    ----------

    It's not about my needs. It's about the Pros' needs.
     
  20. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #20
    What are "professionals"?
     
  21. stuaz macrumors 6502

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    #21
    Your definition of "professional" will be very different from the next person though.

    Can't really fit people or jobs into "moulds"
     
  22. Blackberryroid thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Blackberryroid

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    #22
    Professionals, according to my definition, are people who requires greater performance than average consumers.

    And a part of performance is graphics. The Intel HD Graphics 4000 can't even run games, what more for professional tasks?
     
  23. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #23
    There's the rub. Your definition may not match others' definition of professionals.
    I don't know any "professionals" who list gaming as a requirement for a "professional" computer. I know plenty of professionals who couldn't care less about extreme graphics capability, even though they have high demands for their computer performance.

    You have very subjective definitions of professionals and "pro" computers. Apple is not obligated to conform its product line to match your individual preferences and definitions.
     
  24. AzN1337c0d3r macrumors 6502

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    #24
    The problem is that Apple doesn't even pretend to target its "Pro" products at professionals besides putting "Pro" in the name.
     
  25. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #25
    Who cares? Apple can target whoever they want in their advertising and marketing and they can name their products any way they choose. If someone doesn't like their products or product names, they don't have to buy them. It's useless to complain about it in a forum, as it won't change anything. Changing the name of a product won't change the specs, and changing the specs won't necessarily change the name. If a computer doesn't meet someone's needs, regardless of the name, they can buy something else that does. To obsess about the name of a computer model is beyond trivial. Apple's name "MacBook Pro" is no different than Dell's Inspiron or Latitude or Toshiba's Qosmio or Satellite or Sony's VAIO. It's just a name.
     

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