iTunes Store Facilitating Donations to Support Nepal Earthquake Relief Efforts

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
46,367
8,770



Apple today rolled out a feature through the iTunes Store that allows users to contribute to the American Red Cross in support of relief efforts following the Nepal earthquake that has killed over 2,400 people.

The feature leverages the hundreds of millions of credit cards already on file to allow iTunes users to easily donate $5, $10, $25, $50, $100, or $200 to the relief efforts. Apple will be passing along 100 percent of the donations to the Red Cross.

Aid Nepal Donate in iTunes #iTunes #Nepal #NepalEarthquake pic.twitter.com/s9seJp8RZV - Philip Schiller (@pschiller) April 26, 2015
This is not the first time Apple has used to iTunes Store to raise money for charity, with the company most recently raising money for City of Hope last October. Other previous relief effort fundraising campaigns have included the 2013 Philippine typhoon, the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami, and the 2010 Haitian earthquake.

Article Link: iTunes Store Facilitating Donations to Support Nepal Earthquake Relief Efforts
 

coolfactor

macrumors 601
Jul 29, 2002
4,399
4,043
Vancouver, BC
It's absolutely frightening what has happened in Nepal. Hard to really grasp the terror from just a few pictures and videos. I wish I was in a position to help more.

Nepal experienced a horrific earthquake of 8.2 back in 1934, and over 19,000 people were killed.

A lot of the damage and death in both events was caused by poor building construction. When I look at many pictures, I don't see any reinforcement steel rods in the fallen brick buildings. I hope that, going forward, buildings will be constructed with earthquakes in mind. Reinforced brick walls, and possibly more wooden construction, which can withstand swaying of the land beneath.

I know that Nepal and surrounding areas is a poverty area, and that they've done the best with what they have, but let this terrible event be a turning point. They are on the right track. Just a week before this event, a team of experts around the world met in Nepal to discuss earthquake preparedness. May that mission push forward to some positive changes.
 

DipDog3

macrumors 65816
Sep 20, 2002
1,179
648
If the Red Cross would stop the telemarketing calls from the last time I gave, I might give again...
 

hdwapxt

macrumors newbie
Apr 26, 2015
1
0
Yes, in India, Paytm also started this donation including 50,100,500,1000 Indian rupee !
 

MarkusL

macrumors 6502
Jun 1, 2014
462
1,917
If the Red Cross would stop the telemarketing calls from the last time I gave, I might give again...
Then this may be a good way to give, since Apple promises to keep your identity secret from the Red Cross.
 

gnasher729

macrumors P6
Nov 25, 2005
16,570
3,148
So the real question is does apple still get their usual 30 percent vig?
The real question is: Can you read?

BTW. Many people are using gift cards that they have purchased for less than face value. If you have a $50 gift card that you purchased for $40, and use it for a $50 donation, the Red Cross will get $50, while you spent $40, and Apple actually received $40 minus the cut of the shop that sold the gift card to you.


----------

does the email from apple constitute documentation of the charitable contribution for tax purposes?
People need help now. Worry about your taxes later.
 
Last edited:

Foggydog

macrumors 6502
Nov 8, 2014
408
478
Left Coast
We recently discussed how America continues to reflexively rely on the Red Cross to provide disaster relief despite mounting criticism of the organization.

As interest in the organization grows, we looked into Red Cross's financials to see what we could find.

Okay, we basically just want to know how much these guys are getting paid.

In 2010, top executive compensation looked like this:

Executive director Gail McGovern made $561,210
EVP for biomedical services James Hrouda made $621,779
Biomedical services president Shaun Gilmore made $573,933
Here is the full compensation table, via Guidestar, from 2010.


We recently discussed how America continues to reflexively rely on the Red Cross to provide disaster relief despite mounting criticism of the organization.

Total executive comp came to $4.5 million.

That may seem like a lot, but you have to ask what kind of organization you're comparing the Red Cross to. Most would regard them as a charity, but others might say they're more akin to a large, complex organization that competes with corporations for talent.

In 2010, the Red Cross finished its fiscal year with revenues of about $3.6 billion in revenue (Line I-12).

As far as 501(c)3s, that puts it on par with mega hospital networks, not goodwill organizations.

THIS. I have no problem sending a portion to help, but I haven't cared much for the American Red Cross since I learned how much the officers earn.
 
Last edited:

2457282

Suspended
Dec 6, 2012
3,327
3,006
Just donated, such a tragic event to occur. Praying for all those who were affected...
It's absolutely frightening what has happened in Nepal. Hard to really grasp the terror from just a few pictures and videos. I wish I was in a position to help more.

Nepal experienced a horrific earthquake of 8.2 back in 1934, and over 19,000 people were killed.

A lot of the damage and death in both events was caused by poor building construction. When I look at many pictures, I don't see any reinforcement steel rods in the fallen brick buildings. I hope that, going forward, buildings will be constructed with earthquakes in mind. Reinforced brick walls, and possibly more wooden construction, which can withstand swaying of the land beneath.

I know that Nepal and surrounding areas is a poverty area, and that they've done the best with what they have, but let this terrible event be a turning point. They are on the right track. Just a week before this event, a team of experts around the world met in Nepal to discuss earthquake preparedness. May that mission push forward to some positive changes.
It is always difficult to understand these human tradgedy, but also always reminds us that as much as we think to be in control of out lives, there are always circumstances beyond our control.

It is wonderful in these moments to see people pull together and donate money to aid in the immediate aftermath. But let us not forget that this is not a short term problem. Money helps alot in the short term. But in the long term money will not deal with the human impact of families lost. Look at Hati and Japan. Although all the initial donations are gone and some normalcy has returned, the family members lost have not nor will ever return. The psycological/emotional/spiritual impact of that cannot be solved quickly and often money is of no use. Often all that we have is as Ajones says - prayer.

Of course there are the long term infrastucture issues that need to be dealt with that money can assist with, but here investment seems more appropriate than aid.