I've just been accepted into university...

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Ivan P, Oct 29, 2009.

  1. Ivan P macrumors 68030

    Ivan P

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    #1
    Just got a letter today informing me that I've been successful in obtaining a position at a university, studying for a Bachelor of Information Technology. It's a three year course, and I'm rather shocked to find out tuition fees alone will cost me more then AU$7200 a year (roughly US$6900) - does this sound about right??

    The units I'll be covering in my first year are Communicating in an IT Environment, Programming Principles, Computer Fundamentals, Systems Analysis, Applied Communications, Computer Security, Operating Systems and Systems & Database Design.

    Have to say that, thankfully, a lot of the units are things that I'm interested in. Anybody else here have any experience in doing an IT course, or something similar, at uni?
     
  2. sammich macrumors 601

    sammich

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    #2
    Congrats. I've been doing a degree in Computer Science and Engineering for the last 4 years at USyd.

    Yes, HECS will cost you about $800-900 per 6 CP course without discount. Now it depends on your situation, you can either pay upfront with a 20% discount, or put it completely to your student loan until you start work. In case you don't know, this student loan or HECS debt is interest free until you start earning above a threshold (consult HECS website).

    The 20% is a big concession, and it is nice. But when you start paying off your HECS debt you will get a 10% bonus whenever you contribute more than $500 towards it. Meaning you pay back $1000 in a lump, $1100 gets taken off your debt.
     
  3. TheOnlyJon macrumors 6502a

    TheOnlyJon

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    #3
    Welcome to college ;)
     
  4. savoirfaire macrumors 6502

    savoirfaire

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    #4
    Congrats - that's actually not bad by American university standards...
     
  5. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

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    #5
    Well your tuition is cheap compared to mine $6500/semester.
     
  6. thegoldenmackid macrumors 604

    thegoldenmackid

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    #6
    Yeah, I get to pay a tad under $50,000 - quit your whining.
     
  7. dukebound85 macrumors P6

    dukebound85

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    #7
    um why? i hope you have a nice financial package....

    loans arent fun to pay back

    op: your costs sound on the very affordable/ cheap end fyi
     
  8. rhsgolfer33 macrumors 6502a

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    #8
    Sounds like a good deal to me, I pay double that and I'm on a fairly sizeable scholarship.
     
  9. Chundles macrumors G4

    Chundles

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    #9

    Erm, why are you paying fees at all? Aren't you deferring using HELP? That's what everyone does.
     
  10. Ivan P thread starter macrumors 68030

    Ivan P

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    #10
    Wow, I love how you accuse me of whining when I was merely asking a question. I don't know anyone else that is doing - or has ever done - a course like this so before this topic I had nothing to compare these costs to. It's your choice if you pay $50,000 - regardless of if it's $7200 or $50,000, they're both a hell of a lot of money, especially to someone that's only just turned 18 like myself. Seriously, get a grip.

    Clearly. At the end of the day it's still roughly the same amount that'll be paid though.
     
  11. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

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    #11
    Don't fret. It was a joke!


    Just weigh your options. Sure you might love doing what you study as a profession, but is it economically feasible? Will you be able to pay it back once you're working at the job you went to school for? Just run through all the questions (believe me, there are many) weigh your pros and cons and hop off to the school you settle on.


    Good luck!
     
  12. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

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    #12
    He was asking not whining and something tells me you're not paying a dime.
     
  13. thegoldenmackid macrumors 604

    thegoldenmackid

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    #13
    It was a joke, to the "shocked to..." To the OP, I apologize. And next time I wish to be reminded of my financial state, I will make sure and ask you jessica.
     
  14. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #14
    Your tuition sounds about on line with what schooling costs (unfortunately) these days. Have fun and enjoy/soak up everything, once its over you get to pay that money back so you will need something to remember while your soul is being raped with interest payments.

    Kidding. ;)



    Kind of.
     
  15. GfPQqmcRKUvP macrumors 68040

    GfPQqmcRKUvP

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    #15
    Get in line.
     
  16. sammich macrumors 601

    sammich

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    #16
    HECS loans are indexed at the CPI/Inflation Rate.
     
  17. MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    #17
    BIT? Why not a BSc or a BCMS?

    $7200 a year! Not even Waikato (Best NZ Uni for Computing, something like the top 50 in the world) charges that much. $5500 per year for a standard course.

    I've had a little bit of experience in Computer Science schooling through a scholarship, if you procrastinate you're in trouble.
     
  18. Ivan P thread starter macrumors 68030

    Ivan P

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    #18
    It was my fourth preference (out of four). My first three preferences were for graphic design - while my portfolio was strong my grades let me down (my own fault, nothing I can really do though, the tests were well over a year ago). That's not to say I don't want to do IT - I'm very interested in it - I just prefer other things... :/
     
  19. IntheNet macrumors regular

    IntheNet

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    #19
    The real impressive task today -- is not being accepted or even graduating from university -- but paying for it! Far too much is made of those that study or work through study at colleges; while those that pay the often staggering tuition are often unheralded. Tuition expenses have not kept pace with inflation but instead have far outpaced it as universities seek to raise costs of attendance far beyond the capability of what parents can afford to pay! When I see a baccalaureate ceremony I applaud not the artificial folks on the stage receiving a degree but the real folks in the crowd that paid the bills...

    btw Ivan... $7200 a year ($US6900) is not that rare today matter of fact (sadly it is rather the norm) here in this nation [per semester!] at the East Coast universities (with some far more) and that amount is often compounded with room & board, books/supplies, and endless other costs. One note though (it may be different in AU) but here we have Bachelor of Science or Arts degree(s) in Information Technology (IT) being offered and it is generally a four-year curriculum with emphasis on Enterprise Architecture
     
  20. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

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    #20
    Please explain further? I'm confused. In the American system of colleges and university's if you are accepted into the school then usually the choice of major or degree is up to you. Now you will have to make certain grades in that chosen major to graduate with a degree, but pre-admission grades don't usually exclude you from taking the classes in the major of your choosing. Is it different where you are or am I not understanding what you wrote?
     
  21. Xavier macrumors 68030

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    #21
    I'm paying just under $30,000 to attend my college.
     
  22. balofagus macrumors regular

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    #22
    I don't know about Australia, but it sounds like it might be similar to our system in Canada.

    Here, you apply to the program. You don't just apply to say Wilfrid Laurier University, you apply to Bachelor of Science, Honours Chemistry at Wilfrid Laurier University. And you either get accepted or not. You could apply to two programs at the same school and get accepted to one with offer of an entrance bursary and get declined from the other program. You used to be able apply to General programs (General Art, General Science) but they're definitely a rarity these days. There are also some programs at some schools that have specialisation options and you generally declare them after first year. But it would still be something along the line of H.BSc Program in Specialisation and you would have applied directly to Program.
     
  23. Ivan P thread starter macrumors 68030

    Ivan P

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    #23
    This is strictly how it works in Western Australia, our education system is so backwards that it doesn't even match up to other states in our own country in some regards.

    Basically, this is the 'main' way of getting into university/college here (bear with me, it's complicated as hell):

    - In your final two years of high school, you do a specialised course referred to (I think it's actually changed now, but this is what I did) as 'TEE', which stands for Tertiary Entrance Examinations. To be eligible for university, you're supposed to sit examinations for at least four TEE-level subjects (they're your normal things like English, Math, Human Biology, History, etc).

    - After you sit the TEE, you get a TER (Tertiary Entrance Ranking). Basically, it's a score you get that compares you with everyone else in the state that took the exams at the same time as you. The person that got the highest score in the state gets 99.98 (not 100, for some reason), with everyone else being ranked after them. I got 61.9 as my TER, meaning I'm in the top 50% of the state for the year that I sat the exams.

    - You apply for university - no matter which one it is - through a website called TISC (Tertiary Institutions Service Centre). You pick the courses that you're interested in and which university you want to study it at. Then you have to mail TISC off a big fat cheque for ~$40 ($120 if it's past the deadline) before they'll even process your information. You can choose up to six courses and order them by preference - the most desirable course will be #1, clearly.

    - When the TERs are released, the universities process all the information on TISC. You need a certain TER to get into each course. If you're unsuccessful with your first preference then they'll look at your second, if that's unsuccessful they look at your third, etc, until they find one of your preferences that you can successfully get into based off of your TER. If your TER is too low for any of your preferences, then too bad, you have to find another way of getting into uni.

    It's really quite complicated, and the process took a while for me to understand. The only good thing I found with this process is that you can apply for the same course at various universities so that you have a better chance of getting into the course that you want. I was lucky, I had 4 preferences chosen and, like I said above, it was my 4th and final one that I was successful with.
     
  24. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    #24
    I'm sunk at about $36,000 all on me for each of the next 3 years. Fun.:(
     
  25. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

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    #25
    That is so crazy different from what we do here in the states for a general college education. Now bear in mind I graduated from college 10 years ago so I'm sure there have been some changes made since then and of I'm also sure that specific schools probably do things differently. However, on average, in America you apply to the school and are granted acceptance or denial based on your grades and scores on one of two national predictive higher education tests, the SAT of the ACT. Once accepted to a university you can either declare a major of study at that point or remain "undecided." Typically your first two years of courses are general studies or "core" prerequisite courses that every student must take to graduate. In the final two years, or three in my case :D, you take the specific courses of your chosen degree emphasis or major. Some majors do require certain grade point averages based on your previous two years of academic performance and actually receiving a degree is also based on your academic performance in the courses of your chosen major.

    To a certain extent education in the USA has become a consumer product. Basically, you can participate in and get any degree you want as long as you are willing to pay for it. From the lowest level community college to the most expensive and prestigious university, they really don't care what you do or how you do it as long as you pony up the cash it takes to pay the tuition. Now of course there are highly acclaimed programs that have achieved a recognized status where they can be selective and only take the "best of the best", but I'm talking more about the general college education.

    In our highly individualized society that praises the "exploration of self" in the formative years it's almost crazy to believe that an 18 year old teenager would be expected to know exactly "what he wants to be when he grows up" and to be judged on his ability to academically achieve that because of a test that ranks him against his peers.

    How do people that drop out of school or go to work first and then come back for a degree later in life get into school? Are high school graduates competing against everyone else who wants to get into college on these TEE & TER exams?
     

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