Job searching..

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by heyyitssusan, Oct 13, 2016.

  1. heyyitssusan, Oct 13, 2016
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2016

    heyyitssusan macrumors 65816

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    Feb 9, 2014
    #1
    Job searching is probably one of the most tedious things out there, especially applying to a job, waiting, then once you get a response and they want to interview you, you go to the interview then end up having to wait again to see if you got the job, then if you didn't it's back to square one again.

    I've gone through my series of No's already and it being mid October, I don't want to have to wait til the New Year to find a decent job because of all of the seasonal retail jobs needing holiday help. Does anyone have any tips and am I SOL trying to find a decent job right now? It's so easy to get discouraged and at this point it's starting to feel like I won't go back to work at all with the way things are going. Thanks!

    Also, would love to hear anyone else's story that's been through this as well.
     
  2. ActionableMango macrumors 604

    ActionableMango

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2010
    #2
    This is absolutely a tough time of year to not be employed. I was once laid off in October. A lot of tech firms just sort of shut down hiring in the last quarter and everyone is taking vacations anyway so they just aren't very active. So for months I was seeing absolutely no interest at all. Take heart though, because in the Spring I had multiple callbacks from interested employers.

    So, if you aren't seeing anything, don't worry about it being you. It's quite normal.

    If you literally need money just to make rent and whatnot, then by all means take a seasonal job--they will hire almost anyone. If you don't like retail, look for warehouse or delivery work like Amazon and UPS. They need all the help they can get and perhaps you can make contacts while you are there for a better position.

    Of course I have no idea what you do or would like to do for a living, so please don't feel insulted if these suggestions are way off.
     
  3. heyyitssusan thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #3
    No offense at all, thanks for the suggestions. I'm actually just looking for a day job with weekends off if possible. There are a few I applied for that haven't gotten back to me yet. I figured with the holidays coming up, I'd have to be lucky to get a non retail/seasonal position.
     
  4. davidg4781 macrumors 68010

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    Oct 28, 2006
    Location:
    Alice, TX
    #4
    I'm sure you're smarter than this, and I'm not sure if I should put this out there, but as someone that does hiring, make sure you answer calls from "stranger" numbers and answer them expecting it to be Tim Cook on the other end (Or George Bush or Obama, whatever works). So many times I get stuff like yeah, sup? Or wut you want? After I tell them who I am they change, sometimes, but, unfortunately, by then, it's too late.

    I'll get 500 applicants for maybe 6 positions. I can't waste time on nonsense.
     
  5. heyyitssusan thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #5
    Wow, that's crazy! Yeah i always answer all calls with "hello" because I know I'm applying for jobs and it could be anyone.
     
  6. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

    Joined:
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    #6
    Job hunting seriously needs to be revamped. You send out resumes hoping for at least a "No" and all you ever get is ........

    Likewise when you are interviewing.
     
  7. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

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    Feb 21, 2012
    Location:
    Behind the Lens, UK
    #7
    The reason most places don't send out thanks but no thanks emails is simple. Time.
    I'm currently recruiting (again). I'll get 100's of cv's. if you send out thanks but no thanks emails, there's a good chance a number of them will email back requesting feedback.
    Of course the one thing I don't have is time, as I'm already doing the job of two people as the other guy got up and left!
    Recruiting is a nightmare. That's with out all the agency calls you end up getting.
     
  8. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

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    #8
    Well, okay, but you wouldn't have to actually give feedback, eh?
     
  9. davidg4781 macrumors 68010

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    Oct 28, 2006
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    Alice, TX
    #9
    Also, ask people you know if they're hiring. Places get hundreds of applicants but if one of their good employees says hey, can you look over this one application, you have a better chance of at least getting a good look through, maybe an interview.
     
  10. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

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    #10
    True. But the sort of feedback I'd need to give (if I did) would be yes we decided not to employ you because you can't spell and you turned up in a Manchester United shirt for the interview! Yes that did happen.
    Another candidate was asked which computer applications he was familiar with and responded with he has an Xbox!
     
  11. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    Location:
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    #11
    This cuts both ways, and, I think, has led to a marked decline in manners (and etiquette) on both sides, in that, if employers treat you with a lack of respect, then, they will not be treated with respect in return by those whom they recruit.

    Basic courtesy should allow for the proverbial 'dear John' letter, - and, if necessary - it should be possible to add a disclaimer to the effect that regrettably, it will not be possible to entertain further correspondence in the event that a candidate was unsuccessful.


    Well, yes, but that comes under the heading of 'basic preparation or basic cop-on'.

    I remember asking a former boss of mine - one of the best bosses I had ever worked for - for advice when I was attending an interview elsewhere (he gave me a superlative reference). Puffing on his cigarette, and sipping his coffee, he had similar horror stories, guys with ripped jeans, and so on showing up.

    Mind you, quite a number of young people seem to see spelling as a tedious requirement that inhibits their potential for 'expressing themselves' creatively. Deconstruct the language after you have learned how it is constructed, or put together, not before, used to be my response in the classroom.
     
  12. heyyitssusan thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #12
    Wow, the stories I'm seeing here are crazy. I always dress professionally no matter what interview it is, because I know that that's the first thing that's going to be looked at and frowned upon. And I want to carry myself in the most professional way possible.

    So as far as the application process goes, is it good to send a "follow up" letter a few days after you apply for the job or after an interview? I've always heard it'd be ideal to send one after an interview but I just wanted to confirm for sure.
     
  13. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

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    #13
    Certainly can't hurt.
    Dress well, take any qualifications you have (ideally in a nice folder).
    Use quality paper when sending hard copies and double and triple check spelling and grammar. Don't just hope Word gets it right (it doesn't always)!
    Arrive early. Make sure you know the way etc.

    Research the company you are meeting with and conduct yourself professionally the whole time you are there.
    For example sitting in reception whilst you wait to be seen, if you're playing on your iPhone you maybe on cctv being watched. It can be interpreted that you'll do that when you're supposed to be working.
     
  14. ejb190, Oct 15, 2016
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2016

    ejb190 macrumors 65816

    ejb190

    #14
    Yah, job searching is tough. But most of us have been there. I sure understand where you are coming from.

    I had a track coach that would always yell at you to run through the finish line. I was applying and setting up interviews even after I thought I had a position wrapped up. When I was finally offered the job I had another interview scheduled for the next day. I called to cancel and they begged me to interview anyway. After a couple of months of job searching, feeling needed and having options was exhilarating.

    I wonder from time to time what life would be like if I took that job in a forensics lab...

    I also interviewed at a few places I wasn't really feeling. One of them was the best, most interesting interview process I have ever been through. After a four hour tour/interview/meet and greet they wrapped up with one question - "Can you see yourself working here?" After all their openness and hospitality, I couldn't honestly say yes. But this interview changed how I interview others now that the shoe is on the other foot.
     
  15. heyyitssusan thread starter macrumors 65816

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    Feb 9, 2014
    #15
    Yeah, at this point I would love to have options. I wanted to have multiple interviews going so that way I can pick and choose which place I would fit in best, but it seems like it's much harder this time around. :\
     
  16. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

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    Behind the Lens, UK
    #16
    Keep at it. I was in my previous position 9 years when I got made redundant.
    With a young family, you immediately begin to worry. The world had moved on since I'd last done any job searching.
    It wasn't long before I was interviewed for my current position. It was for less money than I had been on and in a completely different industry.
    Anyway when it got to the offer, the MD asked about my previous salary and matched it!
    I didn't really know what I was doing when I started and had to learn fast.
    Two weeks later I got a phone call from another place where I had interviewed (in an industry I was very familiar with), saying I was their second choice and the first guy had started but was hopeless.
    I decided to stay where I am, and nearly 9 years later I'm glad I did.

    Just keeping knocking on doors and eventually you will find the right one.
     
  17. heyyitssusan thread starter macrumors 65816

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    Feb 9, 2014
    #17
    Just had another job turn me down.. starting to get very discouraging. At this point, don't know what to expect anymore.
     
  18. yaxomoxay macrumors 68000

    yaxomoxay

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Location:
    Texas
    #18
    Please don't.
    I got laid off in October 2013 after many years (10) at my previous company in aerospace. It was tough, and many other good people got laid off with me. Crazy thing, I was badly needed on the project I was working on, so much that due to my layoff the project was delayed about a month, at a daily cost of $25K. It would've been cheaper to keep me on the payroll, but my supervisor - who had no clue what I was doing - had to cut some heads.
    I took it badly, but it was a mistake. Kudos to my wife, however. When I called her to tell her the news, her comment was: "Their loss; time to start anew."
    I didn't sleep the first night, I was afraid, feeling like crying. To tell you the truth, I had some tears coming out my eyes and I am not ashamed to admit it. I felt all the weight of the world.
    Today, in retrospective, I am glad that I was laid off.
    From October 2013 to February 2014 (when I was hired in my current position) I volunteered almost every single day. It opened my eyes to some realities previously unknown to me. It humbled me, it woke me up. If you're not volunteering, do it. I started volunteering to "fill the resume hole" and show that I actually like to do stuff, but man. It was a life changing experience and now I still volunteer albeit in different roles.
    I also went back to school, something that I would've not done.
    Then, I decided to change my field. Tech jobs are moving overseas and honestly, right now it's boring. The fascination of new technologies is quite bland on me... I really don't eagerly wait to test brand new products. So I completely changed in field and I am government now. Some stuff is incredibly tedious, but I put my foot inside a very broad door of an ever broader field... and you won't believe me: stuff actually gets done here. Granted, pay is less and environment is not the best, but I now have a clear objective. I know where I want to go, and I am working towards it.

    It takes time, especially during winter because most Fiscal Years end in December. Try to look into government jobs, fiscal year is usually October 01, to September 30 of each year, which means hiring starts now.
     
  19. Three141, Oct 17, 2016
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2016

    Three141 macrumors 6502

    Three141

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2016
    Location:
    London
    #19
    Not sure of your location, field of work, Industry, sector you're targeting or experience level (I skim read your post) but I do have some generic tips.

    I have been in your shoes as I prefer contract/temporary positions.
    I've also been on the other side and recruited and interviewed for roles.

    My two sense.

    Between September - mid January in my sector recruitment is quiet around temp/contract roles not sure about perm roles.

    Try to apply directly to the companies, Reed and Indeed are good but if you can apply directly sometimes you may get selected.

    In your criteria look for companies you've never heard (I appreciate the irony of that statement), say for example you want to work for Mastercard, look into companies in a similar-ish sector i.e worldpay, worldremit etc
    That might not be as well know; this could range from startups to SME's.
    These companies would prefer to avoid recruitment agents; if they can get someone who fits (or loosely fits) what they are looking for they could call you in.

    You need to have multiple versions of your CV that better target job descriptions you are applying for, the same CV does not always work. Picture this, you are going through 200 CV's, the CV crafted to your advertisement ✅
    The CV with the skills you are looking for buried ❌ the main reason being time.

    Put your interest on your CV (i.e Formula E, technology) as this has got me a few calls in the past.

    Try and limit your CV to two pages.

    If you have the experience; state as a achievement things you improved i.e reduced average debtor days from 90 to 40 days.

    De-clutter when needed your CV and make sure it looks good.

    If appyling to a recruitment agent, I find generic cover letters are fine (they often don't look) but when applying direct try and personalise the letter as some do look.

    In terms of lieing on your CV that's up to you. Some do it, some don't; some pull it off, some fail.

    Personally, rather than lie, I always say review the heck out of Job descriptions, find a common software skill they are looking for and practice the life out of it until your an advance user if you can i.e. Power point and add that.

    Spend an hour or so a day researching your field; if you're on top of it, sometimes it helps for when you do get an interview; it demonstrates your knowledge, interest and possible insight you could bring.

    Hope that helps
     
  20. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

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    Nov 14, 2007
    Location:
    1 Geostationary Tower Plaza
    #20
    Me personally, I just take the "no" and move along. If it's a "No", I obviously know I wasn't qualified. Why ask...
     
  21. heyyitssusan thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #21
    Thanks for the tips!
     
  22. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

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    #22
    Don't lie on Resumes/CVs an employer will always figure it out. Agreed with keeping it short. Rule of thumb for a Resume is 1 page for every 10 years of experience.
     
  23. heyyitssusan thread starter macrumors 65816

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  24. Three141 macrumors 6502

    Three141

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2016
    Location:
    London
    #24
    Just to counter you on that point, an employer will not always figure it out, that is false.

    I've worked in numerous sectors and industries and one thing remains true people lie, not all; but more than you think and employers detecting the lie is hit and miss.

    I found out how prevalent this was during drinks out with colleagues; once hammered toungues slip.

    These have been varying people from management to staff members who have lied and it has worked out for them.

    Some (thankfully) usually get found out in interviews but it usually depends on the experience/skill/BS detector of the person interviewing.
    Other times the BS get the job and it's soon apparent they 'are not cut out' for the position.

    This used to be a large issue in IT when Braindumps were used to pass exams.

    Personally I would not do it; I would rather master a software in high demand and use that as my selling point, plus keep up with industry knowledge but everyone is different.

    When I used to interview; I would ask 'walk me through your CV' as pointless as that question may seem, suspected enhanced CV applicants often got confused by their own CV (interview nerves aside); candidates would get worse when asked for examples and flat out freeze when a verbal question is asked.
    --- Post Merged, Oct 19, 2016 ---
    Congratulations
     
  25. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

    Joined:
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    #25
    I'm not sayin' they won't find out on the interview, but eventually, when they request that skill you lied about (or that language you so happen to be fluent and you are not).

    An employer always finds out, it's just a question if they care or not to be upfront about it. Some will just not care given your guts to get the job and that by the time they found out you have become crucial. Others will make a fuzz of it.
     

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