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Geekbench scores allegedly for the upcoming "M2 Max" chip have surfaced online, offering a closer look at the performance levels and specific details of the forthcoming Apple silicon processor.

14-vs-16-inch-mbp-m2-pro-and-max-feature-1.jpg

The Geekbench results, first spotted on Twitter, are for a Mac configuration of with the M2 Max chip, a 12-core CPU, and 96GB of memory. The Mac listed has an identifier "Mac14,6," which could be upcoming MacBook Pros or the next-generation Mac Studio. Apple offers a maximum of 64GB of memory on the current 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pros, while the Mac Studio can be configured with up to 128GB of memory with the M1 Ultra.

According to the test, the M2 Max chip scored 1,853 in single-core and 13,855 in multi-core. For comparison, the M1 Max chip in the Mac Studio scored 1,755 in single-core and 12,333 in multi-core. If the M2 Max chip results are accurate, the performance increase will be relatively minor for the upcoming chip.

The M2 chip, announced in June 2022, is based on an enhanced version of TSMC's 5nm process. What fabrication process the upcoming M2 Pro and M2 Max chips will have is not entirely clear. While they could feature the same enhanced 5nm process as the standard M2 chip, there are also rumors it could leapfrog to 3nm, offering significant performance and energy efficiency gains.

According to the results, the chip was tested on a Mac running macOS Ventura 13.2, which has yet to enter developer or public beta testing but is being worked on internally at Apple. The first Macs expected to feature the M2 Pro and M2 Max chips are rumored to be updated 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pros, with the Mac Studio to follow sometime next year. The updated MacBook Pros were initially rumored to launch in the October to November timeframe but are now expected to launch in early 2023.

Apple has several Macs in the work for 2023, including updated MacBook Pros, an updated iMac, and the long-rumored Apple silicon Mac Pro. For a complete rundown of all the new Macs we expect next year and beyond, be sure to check out our guide.

Article Link: 'M2 Max' Geekbench Scores Leak Online, Revealing Rumored Specs and Performance
 
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iBluetooth

macrumors 6502a
Mar 29, 2016
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The performance improvements don't seem substantial, but my guess is that they focused on improving the intwerworking on the Ultra chips and allow it to scale better and utilise all the cores available. This was one of the drawback's of of M1, but should be their focus forward.
 

leman

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Oct 14, 2008
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The performance improvements don't seem substantial, but my guess is that they focused on improving the intwerworking on the Ultra chips and allow it to scale better and utilise all the cores available. This was one of the drawback's of of M1, but should be their focus forward.

It was? Where did you get that idea from?
 
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Joe Dohn

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Jul 6, 2020
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When Apple isolated themselves by deprecating OpenGL, and discontinued 32-bit and eGPU support, they started playing a dangerous game: their bet is that their new architecture is so much better that Apple Silicon would be adopted en masse, which would make everyone play in their hands.

That thought is misguided even if the PC alternative is indeed much worse. But if Apple's alternative starts lagging behind and performance doesn't get so impressive over time, the argument for an Apple Silicon machine is less impressive. Why bother spending extra on a machine that is only slightly better or even not better at all than an AMD or Intel chipset?

Sure, right now they have the edge. But if they don't keep up, that edge will eventually disappear.
 
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leman

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Oct 14, 2008
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They decided not to release a Mac Pro and wait for M2 is an indication of that they didn't like the results of the Ultra.

Ah, well, the Ultra was just not sufficient for a Mac Pro product. Can't really compete with a discrete workstation box at that performance level. But there was no indication that Ultra had any systemic problems with performance. There was this persistent rumour that the GPU couldn't be properly utilised (stemming from poor Blender scaling), but that is easily explained by how inefficient Blender is in dispatching work on Apple GPUs in the first place. Even on M1 Max there are huge gaps in the timeline and poor GPU core utilisation.

But frankly, if these M2 Max scores are real, Apple can forget about Mac Pro this year as well. They could pull an M2 Extreme of course, but why would someone buy it?
 

T'hain Esh Kelch

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Aug 5, 2001
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But frankly, if these M2 Max scores are real, Apple can forget about Mac Pro this year as well. They could pull an M2 Extreme of course, but why would someone buy it?
Likely they will increase the voltage quite a bit, and get a lot more power out of the chips going into the Mac Pro. It can maintain cooling much more efficiently, I assume.
 
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