Macos 10.14 predictions

Discussion in 'macOS Mojave (10.14)' started by Jordan246, Jan 1, 2018.

?

Should the new Mac OS be called 10.14 or something else?

  1. 10.14

    80 vote(s)
    75.5%
  2. 11

    11 vote(s)
    10.4%
  3. Something else

    15 vote(s)
    14.2%
  1. AwesomeQ macrumors newbie

    AwesomeQ

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2018
    #26
    Oh, I don't know, maybe BRINGING SUPPORT BACK FOR OLD MACS. MICROSOFT DOESN'T TELL YOU THAT YOUR DEVICE IS UNCOMPATIBLE BASED ON THE YEAR IT WAS MANUFACTURED, BUT TELLS YOU BASED OFF OF HOW MUCH RAM OR HARD DRIVE SPACE YOU HAVE. Maybe something like that would be great.
    --- Post Merged, Feb 1, 2018 ---
    What is this? Is this what you want? Also, is this just Linux that you created yourself? Looks pretty cool, though.
     
  2. frou macrumors 6502a

    frou

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    #27
    Thats more or less what Darwin already is :p
     
  3. dogslobber macrumors 68040

    dogslobber

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2014
    Location:
    Apple Campus, Cupertino CA
  4. EugW macrumors 604

    EugW

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2017
    #29
    Probably no support for MacBook6,1, assuming that is the one you have. But it will still work fine with 10.13 for a few more years. Apple will provide security updates for two more years, and browsers will likely support it for 3-5 more years. So, look for the MacBook6,1 to be a relevant until at least 2020, and possibly 2022.

    I have a 2008 MacBook5,1 and a 2009 MacBookPro5,5. While neither officially are supported for 10.13, both have roughly the same hardware as MacBook6,1, so they run 10.13 just fine. I hope to keep them going for 4-5 more years. In fact, I bought my MacBook5,1 just a few months ago (uber cheap), precisely because it could be made to run 10.13, and would take SSD and memory upgrades.
     
  5. dogslobber macrumors 68040

    dogslobber

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2014
    Location:
    Apple Campus, Cupertino CA
    #30
    Yeah, looking at Yosemite, it was intro'd in mid-2014 and last security update was mid-2017. That suggests HS will be 'officially' supported for another 2.5 years from today.
    I was looking at where the 10.14 axe would fall and I suspect it might be curtains for anything less than an Ivy Bridge system. Apple were still selling Ivy Bridge MBPs in 2016 and Minis in 2014 so I'd hazard a guess those are too new for such an early cut off. Although the 2011 SB iMac isn't on the obsolete list yet so that might be the square peg in the round hole.
     
  6. EugW, Feb 3, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2018

    EugW macrumors 604

    EugW

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2017
    #31
    Apple doesn't necessarily cut off based on Intel generations.

    MacBook6,1 and MacBookPro5,5 both use a 2.26 GHz Penryn P7550 yet MacBook6,1 is supported by 10.13 whereas MacBookPro5,5 is not. In fact, the two machines have the same screen, same GPU (nVidia 9400M), and the same PC3-8500 DDR3 1066 GHz memory.

    Furthermore, I had to retire my 2008 MacBook4,1 years ago (and eventually converted it to Chrome), because it isn't supported by any version of OS X past 10.7.5. It also uses a Penryn CPU.
     
  7. Janichsan macrumors 68000

    Janichsan

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2006
    #32
    You might be misremembering that: aside from the MBP 5,5 being a 13" model, the MBP 6,1 had a 17" screen, an i5-540M CPU and an Nvidia 330M GPU.

    If you mean the 6,1's contemporary 13" counterpart, though, which was the MBP 7,1, you are correct that it also came with a Core 2 Duo Penryn CPU, but with a slightly different model, and with Nvidia 320M integrated graphics.
     
  8. EugW macrumors 604

    EugW

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2017
    #33
    MacBook6,1, not MacBook Pro.

    MacBook6,1 is basically MacBookPro5,5 with the Firewire removed and repackaged in white plastic.
     
  9. dogslobber macrumors 68040

    dogslobber

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2014
    Location:
    Apple Campus, Cupertino CA
    #34
    Another method of segregation might be Metal and non-Metal supporting systems. That pretty much cuts out all pre-2012 machines.
     
  10. Nathan576 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
  11. Gregg2 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    #36
    The Cleveland Browns will win the Super Bowl in 2020. Guaranteed. It's a lock.

    As for macOS 10.14, who knows?
     
  12. Janichsan macrumors 68000

    Janichsan

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2006
    #37
    Ah, right. My bad. I misread that.
     
  13. vasim macrumors member

    vasim

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2017
    #38
    So, what do you think about my Mid2011 mac mini?
     
  14. EugW macrumors 604

    EugW

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2017
    #39
    I’m not sure what you’re asking.
     
  15. vasim macrumors member

    vasim

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2017
    #40
    If it will get the 10.14 update
     
  16. EugW macrumors 604

    EugW

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2017
    #41
    Your mid-2011 Mac mini is a Sandy Bridge i series. I don't necessarily Apple cuts off by Intel generation, but I'm pretty sure no more Core 2 Duo machines for 10.14. However, for your 1st gen i series? I'd give it a 50:50 chance.

    But that's just a complete guess.
     
  17. vasim macrumors member

    vasim

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2017
    #42
    Yes it’s the i5 series . The model with the core 2 duo is the 2010 machine. I think it will get 10.14 but I give a no on the metal support. This mini is not supporting metal at all
     
  18. 0014 macrumors 6502a

    0014

    Joined:
    May 23, 2016
    Location:
    Middle East
    #43
    Judging by the latest MacOS 10.13.4 Beta 2 release last night they might drop support for 32bit apps.

    [​IMG]
     
  19. RandomDSdevel macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Location:
    Kokomo, IN
    #44
    I think I remember Apple saying something about this possibly taking more than just one release of macOS at this past WWDC to the effect that High Sierra would be the last version of it to support 32-bit code 'without compromises,' the next version would drop a certain amount of APIs needed for a non-trivial subset of 32-bit applications to run, and then the next version after that would finish dropping support for 32-bit apps entirely. You're free to double-check that I've remembered this correctly, though.
     
  20. vasim macrumors member

    vasim

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2017
    #45
    I own an hp dc7900 which was first released at 2008. It runs Windows 10 perfect and I don't have to worry when Microsoft will stop support for this machine because simply Microsoft will never stop software support for this machine till it dies or decide to stop 32bit support of the apps.

    Apple at the other side commands and decides to make us send to the trash-can our minis, macbooks etc. regularly trying to make more $$

    If you want to be honest with your clients give them the upgrade and let them decide (as microsoft does) to upgrade or not. We dont need more saviors to our lives (according to iPhones who they degraded the processor power to avoid sudden restarts of the phones..)

    The people some day will wake up and they will send apple to history books
     
  21. dogslobber macrumors 68040

    dogslobber

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2014
    Location:
    Apple Campus, Cupertino CA
    #46
    I installed Windows 10 on my Mini 2009 when it no longer supported anything after El Cap. It's a really nice Windows machine and gives a Mac a post-Apple future. You can download and use Windows 10 indefinitely even if you don't activate it. I've been doing this for many months now.
     
  22. vasim macrumors member

    vasim

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2017
    #47
    This is true but not the point . As I said you can run Windows everywhere (and Linux too)
     
  23. Dr.SL, Feb 14, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2018

    Dr.SL macrumors member

    Dr.SL

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2017
    #48
    I think a new name and new version naming will be appropriate to mirror
    the possibility to run tha same apps on Mac and different iOS devices.

    mOS
    iOS
    wOS
    tOS
    hOS

    The version numbering could be an letter or a Roman number
    mOS-A (first version) / mOS-IV (fourth version)

    The subversions
    mOS-A.1, mOS-A.3 / mOS-IV.a, mOS-IV.c


    Greek alphabet would be more "scientific" but with huge writing problems.... β, δ, λ...
     
  24. RandomDSdevel macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Location:
    Kokomo, IN
    #49
    @Dr.SL: Even though Apple just uses build numbers and notes in their version numbers for this, other software logically uses α to refer to alpha releases and β to refer to beta releases, so using Greek letters in the way you suggest could potentially spawn a bit of confusion, at least initially. γ could also be used to refer to 'general availability' releases, though those are typically are just marked with the abbreviation 'GA.' Delta updates obviously exist as well, though I don't recall ever seeing Δ or δ to mark those off hand. Additionally, having a one-letter prefix for all of Apple's OSes would be rather obtuse; iOS, the only Apple OS which currently has a one-letter prefix, only passes since the 'i' non-ambiguously refers to 'iDevices' for the general public. It would thus make more sense for macOS, watchOS, and tvOS to all keep the same names they have now. We're not sure if the HomePod's iOS derivative will ever receive an official distinction in terms of designation, and you've missed BridgeOS as well, though that one's name shouldn't change either. Such modifications would change these OSes names into obscure technological jargon inscrutable to the masses, at least in part. Finally, the versioning scheme Apple currently uses for its OSes is serving just fine, though I agree you're not the only one to want to see macOS get a major version bump even though I (and possibly/probably others) would rather see some spit and polish applied back the v10.x series first.
     
  25. Jerry Fritschle macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2004
    #50
    A fair guess (still just a guess) would be that the first "compromise" would be the removal of Carbon support, which itself has been deprecated for years. 32-bit Cocoa apps might last awhile longer.
     

Share This Page