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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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Earlier this week we reported on a bug in Apple's macOS Image Capture app that adds empty data to photos when imported from iOS devices, potentially eating up gigabytes of disk storage needlessly. Today, we're hearing that the bug in macOS 10.14.6 and later is a lot more extensive than was initially believed.

image-capture.png.jpeg

NeoFinder developer Norbert Doerner, who originally discovered the bug, informed MacRumors that the same issue affects nearly all Mac apps that import photos from cameras and iOS devices, including Adobe Lightroom, Affinity Photo, PhaseOne Media Pro, and Apple's legacy iPhoto and Aperture apps.

The reason is said to be because the bug is located inside Apple's ImageCaptureCore framework, which is a part of macOS that all developers must use to connect to digital cameras. The only app that isn't affected is said to be Apple's Photos app, which uses other undocumented APIs to talk to iOS devices.

Essentially, the pervasive Mac bug causes HEIC files imported from iOS devices and converted to JPG to contain more than 1.5MB of empty data appended to the end of each file, increasing the file size and eating up storage. As an example, Doerner said he discovered more than 12,000 JPG files in his own photo library containing this extra unwanted data, resulting in over 20GB of wasted disk space.

wasted-space-image-capture.jpeg
Hex data of a JPG file viewed using Hex Fiend

Apple is apparently aware of the bug, but until a patch arrives, one short term workaround for future transfers is to prevent your iPhone or iPad from using the HEIF format when taking photos: To do so, launch the Settings app, select Camera -> Formats and check Most Compatible.

For users with large existing photo libraries, Doerner has suggested using a new beta version of the third-party utility Graphic Converter, which includes an option to remove the unwanted empty data from the JPEG files.

Alternatively, media asset management app NeoFinder is itself being updated on Monday to include a tool that can find and eliminate the unwanted data in JPG files. NeoFinder for Mac costs $39.99 and a free trial is available to download on the developers' website.

Article Link: macOS Image Capture Bug More Pervasive Than Originally Thought
 
Last edited:

537635

macrumors 6502a
Mar 7, 2009
859
780
Slovenia, EU
The problem is, nothing is compatible with HEIF (or HEVC). I get handed a lot of iPhone stuff at work and need to xcode them to JPG or DNX.

That's true. I have an automator script to convert to JPG. Wonder if that has issues also. Otherwise I store everything in HEIF. Google Photos also doesn't do conversion.
 
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cocoua

macrumors 6502a
May 19, 2014
511
257
madrid, spain
2032 discovered a bug in iOS that since iOS 5 has been adding phantom disk size to Cameraroll App even if you delete all picts and switch off iCloud sync

why everyone has this problem but there isn,t a fix yet?
 
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baryon

macrumors 68040
Oct 3, 2009
3,657
2,135
I'm surprised Photos doesn't have it, given how terribly unreliable and needlessly complicated its database is. Good luck when something does go wrong, good luck backing it up, restoring it, splitting it across multiple drives, and finding files when the database fails to index them.
 
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ivarh

macrumors newbie
Jun 30, 2019
3
7
This is a bad bug, but on the other side i would not reccomend converting the .heif files if you are importing them for archiving.

The heif files coming off my iphone 11 pro contains 10 bit color data per channel and this means that in addition of the loss of image quality you get from decompressing a lossy format that .heif is and changing it to jpg that is another lossy format you also loose a lot of color information.

This is not a excuse for apple to not fix the bug but doing this conversion is a bad choice in the first place for archiving.
 
Comment

JosephAW

macrumors 601
May 14, 2012
4,167
5,054
Had problems with HEIF or HEIC since day one. People sharing photos with me in this format on Dropbox or Box were not viewable on other iOS devices or older macOS desktops. Instructed people to turn off this format.

Question. How does this affect video recordings in this format?
 
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MauiPa

macrumors 68020
Apr 18, 2018
2,225
3,157
Exponential is a popular expression nowadays.
Exponential is a popular expression nowadays.
Popular or not, it is wrong. Now you know and can use correct terms henceforth
[automerge]1588333149[/automerge]
I'm surprised Photos doesn't have it, given how terribly unreliable and needlessly complicated its database is. Good luck when something does go wrong, good luck backing it up, restoring it, splitting it across multiple drives, and finding files when the database fails to index them.
You should use a program you do like. Now wasn’t that easy?
 
Comment

cmcbhi

macrumors regular
Nov 3, 2014
114
116


Earlier this week we reported on a bug in Apple's macOS Image Capture app that adds empty data to photos when imported from iOS devices, potentially eating up gigabytes of disk storage needlessly. Today, we're hearing that the bug in macOS 10.14.6 and later is a lot more extensive than was initially believed.

image-capture.png.jpeg

NeoFinder developer Norbert Doerner, who originally discovered the bug, informed MacRumors that the same issue affects nearly all Mac apps that import photos from cameras and iOS devices, including Adobe Lightroom, Affinity Photo, PhaseOne Media Pro, and Apple's legacy iPhoto and Aperture apps.

The reason is said to be because the bug is located inside Apple's ImageCaptureCore framework, which is a part of macOS that all developers must use to connect to digital cameras. The only app that isn't affected is said to be Apple's Photos app, which uses other undocumented APIs to talk to iOS devices.

Essentially, the pervasive Mac bug causes HEIC files imported from iOS devices and converted to JPG to contain more than 1.5MB of empty data appended to the end of each file, increasing the file size and eating up storage. As an example, Doerner said he discovered more than 12,000 JPG files in his own photo library containing this extra unwanted data, resulting in over 20GB of wasted disk space.

wasted-space-image-capture.jpeg

Hex data of a JPG file viewed using Hex Fiend

Apple is apparently aware of the bug, but until a patch arrives, one short term workaround for future transfers is to prevent your iPhone or iPad from using the HEIF format when taking photos: To do so, launch the Settings app, select Camera -> Formats and check Most Compatible.

For users with large existing photo libraries, Doerner has suggested using a new beta version of the third-party utility Graphic Converter, which includes an option to remove the unwanted empty data from the JPEG files.

Alternatively, media asset management app NeoFinder is itself being updated on Monday to include a tool that can find and eliminate the unwanted data in JPG files. NeoFinder for Mac costs $39.99 and a free trial is available to download on the developers' website.

Article Link: macOS JPG File Truncation Bug More Pervasive Than Originally Thought
I rarely store JPEG. Most of my images as stored in camera raw w/ non-destructive imaging.
Would I have this problem?
 
Comment

Supermacguy

macrumors 6502
Jan 3, 2008
365
572
Thanks to the NeoFinder (ie CDFinder) guy! If you need a cataloging app, this one is great. He's been making this for over 20 years and it gets better all the time. Support your independent developer! Since the demise of iView/MediaPro/Expression this is now my #1 tool for disk and image cataloging.
 
Comment

xWvaADmkJU4n

macrumors newbie
May 1, 2020
4
4
The problem is, nothing is compatible with HEIF (or HEVC). I get handed a lot of iPhone stuff at work and need to xcode them to JPG or DNX.
ImageMagick can convert HEIF without a problem.

I agree with the original confusion regarding the suggestion to use only jpeg instead of using only heif.
 
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chrfr

macrumors G4
Jul 11, 2009
11,189
4,751


Earlier this week we reported on a bug in Apple's macOS Image Capture app that adds empty data to photos when imported from iOS devices, potentially eating up gigabytes of disk storage needlessly. Today, we're hearing that the bug in macOS 10.14.6 and later is a lot more extensive than was initially believed.

image-capture.png.jpeg

NeoFinder developer Norbert Doerner, who originally discovered the bug, informed MacRumors that the same issue affects nearly all Mac apps that import photos from cameras and iOS devices, including Adobe Lightroom, Affinity Photo, PhaseOne Media Pro, and Apple's legacy iPhoto and Aperture apps.

The reason is said to be because the bug is located inside Apple's ImageCaptureCore framework, which is a part of macOS that all developers must use to connect to digital cameras. The only app that isn't affected is said to be Apple's Photos app, which uses other undocumented APIs to talk to iOS devices.

Essentially, the pervasive Mac bug causes HEIC files imported from iOS devices and converted to JPG to contain more than 1.5MB of empty data appended to the end of each file, increasing the file size and eating up storage. As an example, Doerner said he discovered more than 12,000 JPG files in his own photo library containing this extra unwanted data, resulting in over 20GB of wasted disk space.

wasted-space-image-capture.jpeg

Hex data of a JPG file viewed using Hex Fiend

Apple is apparently aware of the bug, but until a patch arrives, one short term workaround for future transfers is to prevent your iPhone or iPad from using the HEIF format when taking photos: To do so, launch the Settings app, select Camera -> Formats and check Most Compatible.

For users with large existing photo libraries, Doerner has suggested using a new beta version of the third-party utility Graphic Converter, which includes an option to remove the unwanted empty data from the JPEG files.

Alternatively, media asset management app NeoFinder is itself being updated on Monday to include a tool that can find and eliminate the unwanted data in JPG files. NeoFinder for Mac costs $39.99 and a free trial is available to download on the developers' website.

Article Link: macOS JPG File Truncation Bug More Pervasive Than Originally Thought
This article title is wrong. The files are not being truncated. Rather, data is being appended to the end of the files.
 
Comment

gimbal

macrumors newbie
Aug 9, 2018
9
13
Is it possible this is more than just a "bug"? Apple makes a LOT of money from services including iCloud storage fees, and by inflating photo file sizes, more people would be nagged to upgrade their iCloud storage from the initial free 5GB, to a paid tier, to accomodate a larger iCloud Photo Library. There is potential financial motive here - anyone with the know how should look carefully at all files stored in iCloud to see if there is any similar artificial inflation of file size. It reminds me of the Wells Fargo scandal where staff were creating extra accounts in customer names to inflate their numbers...
 
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chrfr

macrumors G4
Jul 11, 2009
11,189
4,751
Is it possible this is more than just a "bug"? Apple makes a LOT of money from services including iCloud storage fees, and by inflating photo file sizes, more people would be nagged to upgrade their iCloud storage from the initial free 5GB, to a paid tier, to accomodate a larger iCloud Photo Library. There is potential financial motive here - anyone with the know how should look carefully at all files stored in iCloud to see if there is any similar artificial inflation of file size. It reminds me of the Wells Fargo scandal where staff were creating extra accounts in customer names to inflate their numbers...
This is an unfounded conspiracy theory. This bug affects images imported to a Mac manually via the Image Capture app, not images saved in iCloud Photo Library. It's not a widespread workflow for people- most folks just let their device sync photos through the Photos app.
 
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citysnaps

macrumors 604
Oct 10, 2011
7,952
13,863
San Francisco
Is it possible this is more than just a "bug"? Apple makes a LOT of money from services including iCloud storage fees, and by inflating photo file sizes, more people would be nagged to upgrade their iCloud storage from the initial free 5GB, to a paid tier, to accomodate a larger iCloud Photo Library. There is potential financial motive here - anyone with the know how should look carefully at all files stored in iCloud to see if there is any similar artificial inflation of file size. It reminds me of the Wells Fargo scandal where staff were creating extra accounts in customer names to inflate their numbers...

The answer to your question is no. Relax.
 
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jezbd1997

macrumors 6502a
Jul 8, 2015
652
842
Melbourne Australia
I've had my iOS settings switched to "Most Compatible" since HEIF became a thing with iPhone photos
Same here. I have not wanted compatibility issues even if it’s minor.
I tried it briefly after getting my new iPhone but even had issues with 3rd party apps..
My other main issue is I’m still using Sierra. I didn’t want it to have to convert each time I wanted to copy something over
 
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fbr$

macrumors 6502
Feb 6, 2020
321
585
I don't know if it's related to the bug reported here, but there is this bug on iOS/iPadOS:

I select three photos on the Files app:

- Photo 1.HEIC: 1.1 MB
- Photo 2.HEIC: 0.8 MB
- Photo 3.HEIC: 0.8 MB

Total: 2.7 MB

Then, still on the Files app, I create a PDF from the selected photos by:

- clicking "More" then "Create PDF"
or
- clicking "Share", then "Print", then zoom in with two fingers, then click the Share button, then "Save to Files"

I get a 38.1 MB file!

And with pages in the wrong order: 2, 1, 3!

Nice!😩
 
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xraydoc

macrumors demi-god
Oct 9, 2005
8,492
2,523
192.168.1.1
I don't know if it's related to this article, but there is this bug on iOS/iPadOS:

I select three photos on the Files app:

- Photo 1.HEIC: 1.1 MB
- Photo 2.HEIC: 0.8 MB
- Photo 3.HEIC: 0.8 MB

Total: 2.7 MB

Then, still on the Files app, I create a PDF from the selected photos by:

- clicking "More" then "Create PDF"
or
- clicking "Share", then "Print", then zoom in with two fingers, then click the Share button, then "Save to Files"

I get a 38.1 MB file!

And with pages in the wrong order: 2, 1, 3!

Nice!😩
While some of that has to do with this bug potentially, the rest is because converting high resolution images to PDF format is incredibly inefficient.
 
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