Make Leopard Look Like Tiger

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AmazingHenry

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EDIT: Easy Installer
Attached to this post is now an AppleScript that can apply the commands below or revert you to the default Leopard appearance. I recommend using this, but I also recommend reading the info below so you know what you're doing and what problems you may run into.


EDIT: The title was "Weather on Desktop" thanks to Roccat's crazy, unpredictable autofill feature. It's fixed now. Also, I'm sorry I voted in my own poll but the way I set it up I have to vote to see the results. ;)


Over the last several months of which I've been in the PPC Mac community, I've learned a ton of software tips 'n' tricks. Some of it's useless, some of it's useful. I know some of it would be of help to fellow forum members. There's plenty of people here who I'm sure could use some of this stuff. So I'd like to write informational posts like this one every week, sharing these fun tricks. Vote on the poll above if I should continue to do these or if I should stop bothering those who get emails for every new thread in this subfourm. :p Now, into our main topic: Make Leopard Look Like Tiger!

Leopard has much better software support and more useful features than Tiger does. But some people prefer the look of Tiger; the white windows, toned-down traffic lights, less vivid buttons, etc. This guide is not perfect; Leopard will not look exactly like Tiger (for example there's no brushed metal :(), but a lot of things are changed. It's a Leopard-Tiger combo favoring Tiger. So, let's get into it!

STEP 1: Window Frames (In Most Apps)
The first thing to do is make the window frames look like Tiger. Most apps look like Tiger, some don't. Some of the most notable apps where this doesn't work:
-Finder
-BitTorrent
-WebKit/Safari

It will work in most other apps though! To do this, it's one simple Terminal command.

defaults write -g NSUseLeopardWindowValues NO

Log out and back in. Open up iCal (just an example) and see the changes.

STEP 2: Traffic Lights, Buttons, Checkboxes, etc.
Now that we've done window frames, it's time to do the main UI elements: traffic lights, buttons, checkboxes, radio buttons, etc. These changes show up in all apps! Again, it's one Terminal command:

defaults write -g AppleUseCoreUI -bool NO

This basically tells the Mac to stop using the Leopard UI and revert to the file used in Tiger, which means you'll have an 100% authentic Tiger UI.

STEP 3: 2D Dock
Yes, yes; the Leopard 2D dock looks nothing like on Tiger. But it's better than the 3D dock, right? Here's the command:

defaults write com.apple.dock no-glass -boolean YES
and
killall Dock

Now you have the Leopard 2D dock, which looks closer to Tiger than the 3D one would.
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Now Leopard will look somewhat like Tiger. It's not perfect, but it's something. A full Leopard theme for Tiger might be something I'd look into making in the future, with brushed metal and all. But for now this is all we have. Oh, and here's a screenshot of the finished product (I had changed the font on this Mac, ignore that part. None of the commands above change the font):
Picture 2.png


BONUS: Real Tiger Dock on Leopard
Yes, you read that correctly; You can have the real, authentic, Tiger dock running on Leopard. We are taking Dock.app straight from Tiger and putting it on Leopard. All you need is a copy of the Tiger dock, which you can download at the end of this post. Once you have that downloaded, here's how to get it working on Leopard:

Open Terminal and type:

while (true) do
(press enter)
killall Dock
(press enter)
done
(press enter)

Now the dock will disappear. Next, go to your main hard drive, open the System folder, then Library, then CoreServices. Find "Dock" in this bunch of files. Back it up to a safe place (for example your desktop). Now delete the Leopard dock and drag in the Tiger dock which you downloaded. You may be prompted for a password. Finally, close Terminal and double-click the new Tiger dock in CoreServices. The Tiger dock will pop up on the screen. :)
IMPORTANT: This dock has many bugs and problems. I don't recommend installing it on your main PowerPC Mac.

Reverting Back to Normal Leopard
Easy! Three Terminal commands.
defaults write -g NSUseLeopardWindowValues YES
defaults write -g AppleUseCoreUI -bool YES
defaults write com.apple.dock no-glass -boolean NO

If you installed the Tiger dock, follow the same steps but drag your Leopard dock backup into CoreServices.

Conclusion
I hope you enjoyed the first of my little series of tricks. I know this can get confusing at some parts, but I've tried to make it as simple as possible. Post below if you have any questions, and don't forget to vote above!

NEXT WEEK: Make Tiger Look Like Leopard
 

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redheeler

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The first thing to do is make the window frames look like Tiger. Most apps look like Tiger, some don't. Some of the most notable apps where this doesn't work:
-Finder
Will Tiger's Finder run ok in Leopard to match this look? If not then it may be worth trying the Finder from one of the Leopard Developer Previews. Not recommend to do this on a daily-use PowerPC Mac as there may be issues, of course.
 

AmazingHenry

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Will Tiger's Finder run ok in Leopard to match this look? If not then it may be worth trying the Finder from one of the Leopard Developer Previews. Not recommend to do this on a daily-use PowerPC Mac as there may be issues, of course.
Never tried. However I can be pretty sure you wouldn't have brushed metal. I've tried and tried to get that on Leopard. I'm a huge fan of it.
 

redheeler

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Never tried. However I can be pretty sure you wouldn't have brushed metal. I've tried and tried to get that on Leopard. I'm a huge fan of it.
Never know unless you try, and obviously the Leopard apps are not built with brushed metal in mind. One app I know has brushed metal in Tiger is OpenMark, does it not have brushed metal in Leopard with these settings?
 

KawaiiAurora

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Keep up the awesome work! :) My personal opinion: Run Leopard for the Leopard UI and Tiger for the Tiger UI; it's soo simple to do that it takes more time customising your current OS than installing the other OS outright lol
 
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d-oost

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My personal opinion: Run Leopard for the Leopard UI and Tiger for the Tiger UI; it's soo simple to do that it takes more time customising your current OS than installing the other OS outright lol
It's a bit tricky when you're on a G3. The only other way to get the UI to look like Leopard is to pull a @LightBulbFun and replace the G3 with a G4 and actually run Leopard. So it'd be cool to see Tiger looking like Leopard. And equally, Leopard can run more semi-modern software, which Tiger is some cases can't, so for that a Tiger theme for Leopard would also be useful.
 
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redheeler

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Interesting stuff, man! If possible, I'd be interested if someone could make Sierra look like Snow Leopard or just Mavericks too.
Sierra can be themed, but it's not a straight Terminal command or file copy from a prior version because of changes to the system theme file structure. I have been working on theming it myself, but the theme is still far from being complete.
Keep up the awesome work! :) My personal opinion: Run Leopard for the Leopard UI and Tiger for the Tiger UI; it's soo simple to do that it takes more time customising your current OS than installing the other OS outright lol
The problem with running Tiger is no Leopard Webkit, and there are other apps/features that won't work on Tiger like Time Machine, newer version of VLC player. But I get your point, and there's still quite a few PowerPC apps/games that will work on Tiger.
 
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KawaiiAurora

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It's a bit tricky when you're on a G3. The only other way to get the UI to look like Leopard is to pull a @LightBulbFun and replace the G3 with a G4 and actually run Leopard. So it'd be cool to see Tiger looking like Leopard. And equally, Leopard can run more semi-modern software, which Tiger is some cases can't, so for that a Tiger theme for Leopard would also be useful.
I was referring to machines capable of running both OSes decently of course. I mean, I've tried themes, some are convincing but the real deal is just the real deal ;)
[doublepost=1491436696][/doublepost]
Sierra can be themed, but it's not a straight Terminal command or file copy from a prior version because of changes to the system theme file structure. I have been working on theming it myself, but the theme is still far from being complete.

The problem with running Tiger is no Leopard Webkit, and there are other apps/features that won't work on Tiger like Time Machine, newer version of VLC player. But I get your point, and there's still quite a few PowerPC apps/games that will work on Tiger.
Yeah, I agree but using the real deal is the best way to experience the OS IMO. TenFourKit isn't too bad and CorePlayer is a worthy replacement for VLC. I think it really depends on what one wants to do. Main advantage with Leopard, in terms of making it look like Tiger, is that some Tiger UI stuff is still there so it feels more natural ;)
 
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AmazingHenry

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It's a bit tricky when you're on a G3. The only other way to get the UI to look like Leopard is to pull a @LightBulbFun and replace the G3 with a G4 and actually run Leopard. So it'd be cool to see Tiger looking like Leopard. And equally, Leopard can run more semi-modern software, which Tiger is some cases can't, so for that a Tiger theme for Leopard would also be useful.
Liger? :D


Keep up the awesome work! :) My personal opinion: Run Leopard for the Leopard UI and Tiger for the Tiger UI; it's soo simple to do that it takes more time customising your current OS than installing the other OS outright lol
People don't use Leopard for the UI, it's all about software like LWK.
 
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redheeler

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A Snow Leopard like theme or something different you mean?
Because there was never a version of Snow Leopard for Retina displays I decided to make all the assets myself and optimize them for Sierra on Retina displays. The goal is to give an Aqua-like styling to the major UI elements of the OS such as the traffic lights, pushbuttons, toolbar buttons, dropdown menus, etc.
 

AmazingHenry

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One more thing...

Applying the Terminal commands above will allow you to use ShapeShifter themes on Leopard! You can't use ShapeShifter itself, but you can use the themes. Here's how.

You'll need a Tiger Mac (or partition) and a Leopard Mac (or partition). Make sure the Leopard Mac has been made to look like Tiger using post #1.

First, apply your ShapeShifter theme in Tiger. Now, navigate to:

/System/Library/Frameworks/Carbon.framework/Versions/A/Frameworks/HIToolbox.framework/Versions/A/Resources/

Find Extras.rsrc and copy it to your Leopard Mac somehow, maybe with a flash drive. Don't delete this file from Tiger; make a copy.

Once you're in Leopard with your Tiger Extras.rsrc, navigate here again:

/System/Library/Frameworks/Carbon.framework/Versions/A/Frameworks/HIToolbox.framework/Versions/A/Resources/

Then make a backup copy of Extras.rsrc, delete the original, and drag in the Tiger Extras.rsrc. Restart and see the ShapeShifter theme in Leopard.

In Leopard, the menu bar and some window frames will not be effected.
 
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AmazingHenry

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Oh. Call me weird but I love Leopard for its UI above all. Apple's best days were those days in my opinion, nowadays everything is too flat..
I agree with you on that, I just happen to prefer the Tiger UI over the Leopard UI. The Leopard UI is great too.

My favorite OS ever is the Leopard beta. Leopard features like Time Machine and spaces, Tiger UI and TFF support. I tried using one of the later betas as my main OS, but it was too buggy and I missed Roccat.
[doublepost=1491486499][/doublepost]Just did this on my G5, looks great. :D
Picture 4.png

Picture 1.png


:D
[doublepost=1491486652][/doublepost]Oh, and here's what non-working window frame apps look like. Kinda resembles a Leopard version of brushed metal.
Picture 2.png

(I don't use Address Book for my Contacts, that's why it's empty)
[doublepost=1491487744][/doublepost]Post #1 updated with an easy applier that does the Terminal commands for you or reverts back to normal Leopard appearance. I recommend using this to apply the Tiger "theme", but you should still read the original info so you know what you're doing and what problems you may run into.
 
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eyoungren

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Oh. Call me weird but I love Leopard for its UI above all. Apple's best days were those days in my opinion, nowadays everything is too flat..
I have a 17" MacBook Pro that maxes out at Snow Leopard 10.6.8. You may know that Leopard is my preference on PowerPC, but if I could get Snow Leopard on them I would.

SL is the refinement of Leopard and with the black theme I use and XtraFinder I finally achieve an entirely dark OS that I just cannot entirely get with Leopard.

I'm bringing this up not because I'm promoting Intel, but just to let you know that Leopard can and does get even better.

Everything after Snow Leopard is crap. IMO.

I work in Yosemite every day on a MacPro and I still don't understand why everyone wants this trainwreck of an OS (Sierra) on their PowerPC Macs. Thank God for XtraFinder because with all this WHITE I was just going blind!
 
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AmazingHenry

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Never know unless you try, and obviously the Leopard apps are not built with brushed metal in mind. One app I know has brushed metal in Tiger is OpenMark, does it not have brushed metal in Leopard with these settings?
Tried OpenMark on my iBook (which also has these settings), no brushed metal. You can kind of see the lines on the window if you look closely though. A screenshot:
Picture 1.png

P.S. I'm on version 1.60.
 

casperes1996

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Because there was never a version of Snow Leopard for Retina displays I decided to make all the assets myself and optimize them for Sierra on Retina displays. The goal is to give an Aqua-like styling to the major UI elements of the OS such as the traffic lights, pushbuttons, toolbar buttons, dropdown menus, etc.
That sounds like one hell of a task. How's it going? Can I see the work in progress?
 

AmazingHenry

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Will Tiger's Finder run ok in Leopard to match this look? If not then it may be worth trying the Finder from one of the Leopard Developer Previews. Not recommend to do this on a daily-use PowerPC Mac as there may be issues, of course.
I'm trying this now. I'll have the results soon. I'll try it again next time I have the Leo Dev Preview installed on something.

EDIT: The Finder on my iMac G4 seems to be messed up. It will only let me copy some of the contents of it (strange, right?) and it's a version too old for the OS! And my only other Tiger computer, my iBook G3 "Snow", is running 10.4.4 so I'm afraid that Finder version is too old. I'll be reinstalling Tiger on my iMac G4 soon for that Tiger Sierra Theme though, so hopefully I can get a working Tiger Finder version then.
 
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AmazingHenry

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I saw that the Finder dock had 6 downloads... has anyone actually installed it? I haven't tried in awhile and I'm curious how well it works and if it impacts performance. @RhianB thought that it may make performance better on low-spec Macs.
 

AmazingHenry

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Jeez, these things just keep coming up... I won't have access to a Tiger Mac or awhile, so the next post will not be "Make Tiger Look Like Leopard" but something else. I'll be on a normal schedule for this soon! :D