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macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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Arstechnica's blog provides some confirmation of earlier reports that Apple's iPhone is going through last-minute quality control and development issues.

An earlier report claimed Apple had run into several issues with the iPhone's software as well as some concerns about Battery life.

Ars claims that according to their source that Apple has "50 OS engineers working around the clock in Taipei to make sure that this shipped on time." They also claim that the last minute issues remain "software Q/A and OS-related issues" rather than battery life concerns.

As a result, their source believes that only a "trickle" of iPhones will make there way into shipping by the end of June, with difficulties with keeping up with early demand.
 

aricher

macrumors 68020
Feb 20, 2004
2,211
1
Chi-il
Looks like we can expect frequent software updates for the first few months after the release. At least they're trying to stay firm on the shipping date.
 

nagromme

macrumors G5
May 2, 2002
12,546
1,196
I have no doubt initial demand will be tight--that's been the case for less-unique products in the past.

As for "issues"--it's hard to imagine a complex software-hardware device NOT having "issues" still in progress 2.5 months before release. Evidence of anything more dire than that is lacking--just anonymous vague comments and speculation.

Software issues are the best kind at least :)
 

roland.g

macrumors 604
Apr 11, 2005
6,928
2,309
Of course, this thing can't be buggy beyond an acceptable level when it ships with all the hype, especially if early adopters are to be your promoters. You don't want someone saying this thing has this problem and that.
 

BlueRevolution

macrumors 603
Jul 26, 2004
6,054
2
Montreal, QC
Of course, this thing can't be buggy beyond an acceptable level when it ships with all the hype, especially if early adopters are to be your promoters. You don't want someone saying this thing has this problem and that.

Agreed. Can't forget the buzz about Nanos scratching that was around right after their release.
 

Chaszmyr

macrumors 601
Aug 9, 2002
4,267
85
I think I'll be taking a 2nd generation iPhone :p Definitely :D

I will too... Of course, I'll be taking a 1st generation iPhone first :p

I don't like to hear about delays causing supply issues, I was hoping that Apple would ramp up production a couple months in advance to meet demand.
 

ejbenjamin

macrumors member
Mar 21, 2005
45
0
There's a few things about this rumor that seem a bit off to me. For one, if the problems are software-related, then why have the engineers been shipped to Taipei?

And two, would software issues really cause production shortages? iPhones that have already been manufactured could simply be updated before they're boxed up and shipped out. That's not going to cause a delay on the scale the rumor implies.

Maybe I'm not familiar enough with the development processes involved, but this one just isn't fitting together.
 

05elstonc

macrumors regular
Sep 21, 2006
124
0
Miami
The fantastic part about the device, and all new Apple devices is their ability to update themselves. The iPhone will not be used heavily without being synced to a computer. This means apple can push any software updates it needs too whenever they need to. Unlike most cell phones that have maybe 1 update their entire life cycle, the iPhone can be updated monthly if needed. Plus the majority of people will charge their iPhone at their computer at least 3 times a week, so people will not be going long stretches without software updates unable to update their device. Furthermore much of the batterlife is dependent on OS optimization which can be updated. As long as the hardware components are reliable and work well together, the iPhone will work the way apple intends because the experience will come down to the software. I cannot wait to line up at the Apple store the day of the release and play with the device. It is going to be crazy.
 

acrafton

macrumors 6502
Jan 18, 2006
267
1
There's a few things about this rumor that seem a bit off to me. For one, if the problems are software-related, then why have the engineers been shipped to Taipei?

I don't think the issue is that they "shipped engineers" to Taipei but that is where they are doing the IPhone OS engineering. The engineers there are most likely working at 50% of what an American would want, don't demand options, and will do pretty much what Apple tells them to do.

This approach can work well for maintenance or legacy work but rarely works well for new, cutting edge development due to the language differences, time differences, etc. . .don't know, but this may be adding to the delay and then Apple woke up and said 'oh shi*' and pulled a bunch of QA and other developers off of Leopard to get this thing back on track.
 

MisterMe

macrumors G4
Jul 17, 2002
10,709
64
USA
...

Maybe I'm not familiar enough with the development processes involved, but this one just isn't fitting together.
I totally agree. If the problem is software, then there is nothing to prevent hardware production from going forward. The software can be loaded when it is ready. Also, a software problem should not cause a slowdown; it should cause a halt in production until shippable code is ready to be loaded. And no, it makes no sense to spend the money required to fly 50 engineers across the Pacific and keep them there for two months to fix a software problem. The more I think about it, the more holes I find in this story.
 

Konradx

macrumors 6502
Oct 19, 2005
288
1
Toronto, Canada
i bought the first Video ipod the second it was announced and on available on the apple store. Should i take the same risk again with the iPhone? I dont think Apple would pull an EA or Ubisoft and ship a broken product, with patches out before its even released (I Hope).
 
I totally agree. If the problem is software, then there is nothing to prevent hardware production from going forward. The software can be loaded when it is ready. Also, a software problem should not cause a slowdown; it should cause a halt in production until shippable code is ready to be loaded. And no, it makes no sense to spend the money required to fly 50 engineers across the Pacific and keep them there for two months to fix a software problem. The more I think about it, the more holes I find in this story.

that software is loaded during production, either as a HD or ROM. If the software isn't ready, what are they going to do with 1 million phones, just let them take up space while the software gets worked out? Then they have to program 1 million phones?

no, the software must be done before production can begin.
 

CoreWeb

macrumors 6502
Mar 2, 2007
456
0
Edge of reason
There's a few things about this rumor that seem a bit off to me. For one, if the problems are software-related, then why have the engineers been shipped to Taipei?

That is an excellent point - all that developers should need is ONE finished iPhone (or a few) to test on, and then they can work at Cupertino, or even Hawaii, to get the OS complete. With the internet, anything is possible.

And two, would software issues really cause production shortages? iPhones that have already been manufactured could simply be updated before they're boxed up and shipped out. That's not going to cause a delay on the scale the rumor implies.

I doubt it would be that easy to update hundreds of thousands or millions of iPhones. How would one go about doing that? Take each one to a computer and update the software? Not likely.

In other words, I'm not sure why developers would have been sent to Taipei, but it makes sense that software issues could delay the iPhone.
 

ajonessn

macrumors newbie
Jul 15, 2005
5
0
I would venture out and say that Apple knows what they're doing. Even if there are software issues, you're looking at some of the brightest minds in technology (except those guys working at Google) and surely they'll be able to solve whatever issues are prevalent.

Would anyone else bet that Apple wouldn't have announced the device if they hadn't planned for something like this?
 

roland.g

macrumors 604
Apr 11, 2005
6,928
2,309
My birthday is in July. However, neither my wife or any of my family get on MR. So I think the hint will go unnoticed. Not to mention my wife is not going to get me a $600 phone.
 

yellow

Moderator emeritus
Oct 21, 2003
16,016
1
Portland, OR
I love the quote:

All I can say in response to that is that I hope some of you are getting ready to perform sexual favors for your favorite Apple and/or Cingular retail store personnel, come June/July.

+1

Classic!
 
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