Need Urgent Macbook Pro help please! (many issues)

Dare_O

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Original poster
May 16, 2016
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Palmdale
I really need some help/advice on what to do. I have a macbook pro late 2011with 8gb ram and 120gb pny ssd. I am having a few problems with it. For starters, the keyboard and trackpad arent working. I took it to get a diagnosis and the computer tech guy said he tested the logic board so thats fine. So i decided to buy new keyboard and track pad, and still nothing! It doesnt work and now the power doesnt work and one of the usb drives doesnt work either. Besides all of this, the MBP is running REALLY slow, especially considering the fact that I have an SSD and 8GB of ram. Let me know if you can help and/or need further info.
[doublepost=1463412440][/doublepost]Also I forgot to mention the i have no battery in the system. Its running on external power
 
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Dare_O

macrumors newbie
Original poster
May 16, 2016
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Palmdale
I actually recently bought it. I thought they might have spilled something so i completely checked the logic board and it had nothing. No signs of corrosion or water damagae at all. Just a little dusty but not too bad
[doublepost=1463416340][/doublepost]
Did you spilled something on it?
I actually recently bought it. I thought they might have spilled something so i completely checked the logic board and it had nothing. No signs of corrosion or water damagae at all. Just a little dusty but not too bad
 

tubeexperience

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Feb 17, 2016
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I actually recently bought it. I thought they might have spilled something so i completely checked the logic board and it had nothing. No signs of corrosion or water damagae at all. Just a little dusty but not too bad
So when did the problems started occurring? For example, a month after you bought it.

Also, who is this "computer tech guy"?
 

Dare_O

macrumors newbie
Original poster
May 16, 2016
13
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Palmdale
So when did the problems started occurring? For example, a month after you bought it.

Also, who is this "computer tech guy"?
Ok so I bought the MBP with no battery, Ram, or hardrive, i bought 2 4gb ram and installed them. Then I connected my old hardrive from a mid 2007 macbook. The ram and hardrive were essential in atleast turning on the macbook. When the MBP turned on it loaded up to my older 2007 macbook's profile and OS. Thats when I noticed the keyboard and trackpad werent working. So I took it to a local computer repair store "computer tech guy" and he said the mother board is good (which is what I was afraid of) and that it is a defective keyboard and trackpad. So I replaced them and they still dont seem to work.
 

Dare_O

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Original poster
May 16, 2016
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Palmdale
What version of OSX? The 2011 models will require 10.6.6 or newer.
It was on 10.7 then i tried updating it to el capitan and it downloaded fine but it doesnt want to install. Everytime i try turning it on it goes to the apple logo with the installation bar in the bottom of the apple. It installs a little bit but it just stays there.
 

treekram

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So you downloaded El Capitan and it started to install and part of the installation is a system reboot which starts but never completes. Is that what happened? For me, I have had that problem when using a USB flash drive install or when running the El Capitan install program from a disk which was not the boot disk. There maybe other reasons why the reboot is unsuccessful - perhaps because of the hardware issues you mentioned earlier?

IMO, I think you should get your hardware issues sorted out first before trying an El Capitan install. Is your keyboard/trackpad working now or are you using a USB keyboard/trackpad? Have you tried running the Apple Hardware Test? Certain MBP's, (I think the 2011 MBP is one of them, but I'm not sure) will deliberately run significantly slower if there is no battery. I would try to determine what needs to be replaced and what it would cost and then based on that decide if it's worth it or not.
 

Dare_O

macrumors newbie
Original poster
May 16, 2016
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Palmdale
So you downloaded El Capitan and it started to install and part of the installation is a system reboot which starts but never completes. Is that what happened? For me, I have had that problem when using a USB flash drive install or when running the El Capitan install program from a disk which was not the boot disk. There maybe other reasons why the reboot is unsuccessful - perhaps because of the hardware issues you mentioned earlier?

IMO, I think you should get your hardware issues sorted out first before trying an El Capitan install. Is your keyboard/trackpad working now or are you using a USB keyboard/trackpad? Have you tried running the Apple Hardware Test? Certain MBP's, (I think the 2011 MBP is one of them, but I'm not sure) will deliberately run significantly slower if there is no battery. I would try to determine what needs to be replaced and what it would cost and then based on that decide if it's worth it or not.
Yea it gets stuck and i left it for like 8 hours and didnt move a centimeter. But im not installing from a flash drive or disk. Its downloaded from the appstore.i would like to run a hardware test, however i cant go into my macbook wothout it going to the installation menu first.

My keyboard and trackpad are still not functional, i am using a usb mouse and keyboard. Is it possible to run a diagnostic test on the macbook even though it is stuck in that installation screen? Is there anyway I can bypass the installation of El capitan. Keep in mind my trackpad and keyboard are not functional, considering the fact that they are brand new.
 

treekram

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You can try to run the Apple Hardware Test from the Internet. You need to press Option(Alt)-D right after the chime sounds (hopefully your speaker works?). On typical systems, that will bypass the normal OS load. I don't know if having the OS in mid-upgrade makes a difference. I tried this from a USB keyboard on my 2012 MBP and it responds to the USB keyboard. To run AHT from the Internet, you need a working wired or wireless Internet connection (hopefully one of those work). There's a way to run the AHT from a bootable USB stick if you can't get that working. But did you say you have one non-working USB port?

If you've tried it more than once and it still doesn't work, you might want to just abandon the El Capitan upgrade and try Internet Recovery to reinstall whatever OS the MBP came with. That's Command-Option-R after you hear the chime. You can try a NVRAM and SMC reset to see if that helps. Those are frequently prescribed and a lot of times it doesn't help but sometimes it does and it's pretty easy to do.

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204063

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201295
 

Dare_O

macrumors newbie
Original poster
May 16, 2016
13
1
Palmdale
You can try to run the Apple Hardware Test from the Internet. You need to press Option(Alt)-D right after the chime sounds (hopefully your speaker works?). On typical systems, that will bypass the normal OS load. I don't know if having the OS in mid-upgrade makes a difference. I tried this from a USB keyboard on my 2012 MBP and it responds to the USB keyboard. To run AHT from the Internet, you need a working wired or wireless Internet connection (hopefully one of those work). There's a way to run the AHT from a bootable USB stick if you can't get that working. But did you say you have one non-working USB port?

If you've tried it more than once and it still doesn't work, you might want to just abandon the El Capitan upgrade and try Internet Recovery to reinstall whatever OS the MBP came with. That's Command-Option-R after you hear the chime. You can try a NVRAM and SMC reset to see if that helps. Those are frequently prescribed and a lot of times it doesn't help but sometimes it does and it's pretty easy to do.

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204063

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201295
Ok so first of all I really appreciate your help. So i sucessfully ran the hardwarre test and it gave me this error code. 4sns/1/c0000008: tsop--124. I believe it may have to do woth the fan, anyways i still doubt thats the reason for the issues im having right?
 

treekram

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From what I can find, the AHT is finding with a problem with the Palm Rest Temperature Sensor and that this part is built into the trackpad. A symptom would be a fan that is running on high. So is the fan running on high (you would hear it) when you run the computer?

The thing about the AHT is that just because it says that nothing is wrong doesn't mean that everything is right. Obviously, it didn't find a problem with your keyboard and I think it should have noted that you weren't running with a battery.

So the question I would have is how did you do the trackpad/keyboard replacement? Did you do it yourself? Did you get new replacements and what kind of replacements were they?

I think you need to solve the trackpad and keyboard issue first. It's possible the problem with the trackpad sensor is what causes it to run slow, or as I mentioned earlier, the lack of a battery. But I don't think it makes sense to buy a battery unless you get some indication that the computer will work to your satisfaction at some point. If you don't want to use the computer with the integral keyboard then if you can't get that fixed, then why worry about the other problems? So I think it'll be good if you start from there - if you can answer the question about the keyboard/trackpad, we can get our bearings.
 

Dare_O

macrumors newbie
Original poster
May 16, 2016
13
1
Palmdale
From what I can find, the AHT is finding with a problem with the Palm Rest Temperature Sensor and that this part is built into the trackpad. A symptom would be a fan that is running on high. So is the fan running on high (you would hear it) when you run the computer?

The thing about the AHT is that just because it says that nothing is wrong doesn't mean that everything is right. Obviously, it didn't find a problem with your keyboard and I think it should have noted that you weren't running with a battery.

So the question I would have is how did you do the trackpad/keyboard replacement? Did you do it yourself? Did you get new replacements and what kind of replacements were they?

I think you need to solve the trackpad and keyboard issue first. It's possible the problem with the trackpad sensor is what causes it to run slow, or as I mentioned earlier, the lack of a battery. But I don't think it makes sense to buy a battery unless you get some indication that the computer will work to your satisfaction at some point. If you don't want to use the computer with the integral keyboard then if you can't get that fixed, then why worry about the other problems? So I think it'll be good if you start from there - if you can answer the question about the keyboard/trackpad, we can get our bearings.
Yes The fan is running on high actually! I bought the new keyboard and trackpad from amazon and installed them myself. Fairly easy process. I really do want the integrated keybaloard and trackpad. Will be nonuse for me of they dont work :/
 

treekram

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As I mentioned earlier, a lot of times an SMC/PRAM reset doesn't help at all. But considering that you have a new trackpad and it's easier to do that than opening up the computer, I would make sure to do that. Some people report that they had to do a SMC reset multiple times. That wouldn't explain why temperature sensor problem, though. If after doing the SMC reset, things aren't work, it's a either: 1) defective trackpad/keyboard, 2) improper installation or 3) something is not right with the logic board.

1. Defective trackpad. Did the trackpad have the part #'s 922-9063, 922-9525, 922-9773 as part of their description? Those are the Apple part #'s - you probably didn't get Apple parts but the description should have had that as the part they're replacing.

2. The trackpad installation is pretty straightforward - the keyboard seems to be difficult - 50+ screws on the keyboard. Is that right?

3. I think the most likely place for problems with the logic board with regards to the trackpad is the connector. Take a look at https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/MacBook+Pro+13-Inch+Unibody+Late+2011+Trackpad+Replacement/7664

If you look at step 8, there may be a liquid spill indicator to the left of the trackpad connector (the thing with the white dot). Do you have that in your computer - does it seem to be a LSI? Is it still white? In step 10, you can click on the picture and then magnify it - does your connector look as pristine as the one in the picture?

You can also try disconnecting the USB mouse and see if the trackpad works (but that wouldn't explain the sensor issue).

If all 3 of these things are fine - that's a tough one - you're going to have to decide whether to proceed or not. The trackpad installation is pretty straightforward. If the fan was running on high constantly before the trackpad replacement, I would think that there's something wrong with the logic board because it wouldn't be that likely that both trackpads had the same problem. If the fan running on high only happened with the new trackpad, you may want to try putting back the old one, running diagnostics and seeing if you get the same issue. If you don't have the same error, then there's a good chance the sensor in the new trackpad is defective and it should be returned. That would also confirm that the error code you got is the sensor in the trackpad.
 

Dare_O

macrumors newbie
Original poster
May 16, 2016
13
1
Palmdale
As I mentioned earlier, a lot of times an SMC/PRAM reset doesn't help at all. But considering that you have a new trackpad and it's easier to do that than opening up the computer, I would make sure to do that. Some people report that they had to do a SMC reset multiple times. That wouldn't explain why temperature sensor problem, though. If after doing the SMC reset, things aren't work, it's a either: 1) defective trackpad/keyboard, 2) improper installation or 3) something is not right with the logic board.

1. Defective trackpad. Did the trackpad have the part #'s 922-9063, 922-9525, 922-9773 as part of their description? Those are the Apple part #'s - you probably didn't get Apple parts but the description should have had that as the part they're replacing.

2. The trackpad installation is pretty straightforward - the keyboard seems to be difficult - 50+ screws on the keyboard. Is that right?

3. I think the most likely place for problems with the logic board with regards to the trackpad is the connector. Take a look at https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/MacBook+Pro+13-Inch+Unibody+Late+2011+Trackpad+Replacement/7664

If you look at step 8, there may be a liquid spill indicator to the left of the trackpad connector (the thing with the white dot). Do you have that in your computer - does it seem to be a LSI? Is it still white? In step 10, you can click on the picture and then magnify it - does your connector look as pristine as the one in the picture?

You can also try disconnecting the USB mouse and see if the trackpad works (but that wouldn't explain the sensor issue).

If all 3 of these things are fine - that's a tough one - you're going to have to decide whether to proceed or not. The trackpad installation is pretty straightforward. If the fan was running on high constantly before the trackpad replacement, I would think that there's something wrong with the logic board because it wouldn't be that likely that both trackpads had the same problem. If the fan running on high only happened with the new trackpad, you may want to try putting back the old one, running diagnostics and seeing if you get the same issue. If you don't have the same error, then there's a good chance the sensor in the new trackpad is defective and it should be returned. That would also confirm that the error code you got is the sensor in the trackpad.
I posted some pics that i think can help. These are from my mac
https://imgur.com/a/9K0F1
 

treekram

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Those are good close-up pictures. There isn't visible signs of liquid damage and if that the white dot is the liquid sensor, then it hasn't been tripped. You should take the trackpad connector off and see if there are visible signs of damage. There's some dispute on the web about where the sensor is located, the consensus is that it's in the trackpad cable. So if your replacement didn't come with a cable and you used the old cable, then that could be a problem. If your replacement did have the cable, as I mentioned, try the old trackpad and re-run the Hardware Test.
 
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Dare_O

macrumors newbie
Original poster
May 16, 2016
13
1
Palmdale
Those are good close-up pictures. There isn't visible signs of liquid damage and if that the white dot is the liquid sensor, then it hasn't been tripped. You should take the trackpad connector off and see if there are visible signs of damage. There's some dispute on the web about where the sensor is located, the consensus is that it's in the trackpad cable. So if your replacement didn't come with a cable and you used the old cable, then that could be a problem. If your replacement did have the cable, as I mentioned, try the old trackpad and re-run the Hardware Test.
I took pics of the connection and connector of the trackpad here they are
http://imgur.com/a/ILB37
 

Dare_O

macrumors newbie
Original poster
May 16, 2016
13
1
Palmdale
The last gold-colored clip at the upper left of the picture is not right. If it was broken off, it wouldn't be there so there may be a way it can be put back like the other connectors.
Ohh yea! Thats completely broken! I tried putting it back in place it the gold thingy flicked up and it dissapeard so thats gone! Is this bad? And also I have an update in regards to my keyboard. So i researched a little more and theres a "tape method" to connecting it and i used the method and it turned out it i didnt connect it fully. So now the power button is fully functional and they keys barely work. I click a little hard and it reacts fairly slow.
 

treekram

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Nov 9, 2015
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You should try to find the gold-colored clip than try to attach it like the other clips. If that's not possible, you may be able to put some solder in there to connect what the clip connected. You can't use the traditional soldering method - it has to be something that you can apply just a small amount of solder without a lot of heat. Cold heat soldering maybe? I've only done the traditional soldering so I don't know about the more modern types.

About the keyboard - it sounds like you're on the right track. If you can get the trackpad working (with the sensor working), I think you should be able to see if the computer will be functional outside of the bad response of the keyboard. If you can load an OS (I would load Lion off of the Internet Recovery and worry about El Capitan later) and if it can run for long periods of time without problems, then you can consider finding a repair shop to fix the keyboard connector. (A lot of people have El Capitan install problems and almost all of them don't have hardware issues.)

EDIT: It looks like solder paste is a possible alternative. Like I said, I'm not familiar with the non-traditional solder methods.
 
Last edited:

Dare_O

macrumors newbie
Original poster
May 16, 2016
13
1
Palmdale
You should try to find the gold-colored clip than try to attach it like the other clips. If that's not possible, you may be able to put some solder in there to connect what the clip connected. You can't use the traditional soldering method - it has to be something that you can apply just a small amount of solder without a lot of heat. Cold heat soldering maybe? I've only done the traditional soldering so I don't know about the more modern types.

About the keyboard - it sounds like you're on the right track. If you can get the trackpad working (with the sensor working), I think you should be able to see if the computer will be functional outside of the bad response of the keyboard. If you can load an OS (I would load Lion off of the Internet Recovery and worry about El Capitan later) and if it can run for long periods of time without problems, then you can consider finding a repair shop to fix the keyboard connector. (A lot of people have El Capitan install problems and almost all of them don't have hardware issues.)

EDIT: It looks like solder paste is a possible alternative. Like I said, I'm not familiar with the non-traditional solder methods.
Ok thanks im running the internet recovery install for lion right now
 
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