New Mac Pro. When?

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by Yakuza, Jan 2, 2010.

  1. Yakuza macrumors 6502a

    Yakuza

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Location:
    Lisbon, Portugal
    #1
    Hey there!

    I was wondering when the Mac Pro will have an upgrade, since in the Mac Pro Buyer's Guide says not to buy, update soon, and the update time in days as surpassed the 260 or so.

    Isn't there any rumors of anything about it? A long side that happened for the iMac before it came out, there was a lot threads and speculations and question's.

    Well i have two. Does anyone knows when it will come out, and will it have a price drop like it happened with the new iMac's.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Cindori macrumors 68040

    Cindori

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  3. Umbongo macrumors 601

    Umbongo

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    #3
    The buyers guide has little relevance, it includes power macs and Apple don't update based on some schedule they devise. It is dependant on new processors from Intel.

    The next processor release is March 16th according to early sources. Some say Apple will get processors early again like they did last year. The 06 and 08 systems were launched 6 and 8 weeks after the processor street dates. 09 was 4 weeks before.

    You should also consider certain options (like high end graphics card) may also delay an order if you need something by a specific date.

    As for a price drop, it seems unlikely a Mac Pro will ever be cheaper than the iMac, regardless of what hardware you get.
     
  4. Yakuza thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Yakuza

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    #4
    yeah, part of me already knew that hardly will be a price drop in a professional machine like the Mac Pro, but, who know's if Apple doesn't want to do the same surprise like in iMac lolol, guess i'm asking for to much.

    Although it's a very expensive machine, i just asked this question just for knowledge, because i'm considering one as a plane B of the future i5 to come with problems of anykind
     
  5. gugucom macrumors 68020

    gugucom

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    #5
    The Mac Pro has become an oddball in a consumer product company that is named Apple. They have made moves that indicate high prices are there to stay for the life time of the product.

    1. Last MP4,1 saw a drastic price hike in a shrinking market, which would indicate that Apple are milking it out prior to withdrawing from the segment
    2. They allowed the 4 core i7 iMac to canibalize market share from the Mac Pro which seems to further indicate that the Professional product isn't for the long run
    3. Apple slows down the rate of Pro software launches which indicates there are reduced sales and fewer engineering resources
    4. The last Mac Pro has been for sale for 10 month and still has a major bug (audio bug) which is unfixed

    All this points to a cash cow / withdrawal marketing strategy that makes price drops unlikely.
     
  6. Gonk42 macrumors 6502

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    near Cambridge
    #6
    I agree with your analysis, but I think you meant "withdrawal" (an act or gradual process of withdrawing) rather than "with drawl" (drawl = to speak in a slow lengthened tone) :)
     
  7. lemonade-maker macrumors 6502

    lemonade-maker

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    Jun 20, 2009
    #7
    Apple develops their other products on macpros. They make their in-house dev machines available to the public. Apple will never use an iMac to prototype things. It is only an oddball looking from the outside in. Apple will require pro type machines for their own purpose for quite a while. Hopefully they will continue to sell them to the public.
     
  8. Big Boss Man macrumors regular

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    Oct 27, 2006
    #8
    If Apple discontinues the Mac Pro, they would be giving up the entire pro audio market. No studio is going to use anything without an option to add PCI express cards. They would also lose Logic users. A lot of people who record on Mac Pros also own MBs, MBPs, iMacs. Some of those users would be lost too. I know I would move back to Windows exclusively if the Mac Pro disappears.
     
  9. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

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    #9
    I suspect the only way they would discontinue the Mac Pro is if sufficient organizations stop buying them. It would then be hard to argue that many would care or that their voices would matter.

    A much more reasonable approach is to continue the product line with minimal investment and high prices to ensure it remains profitable.
     
  10. Icaras macrumors 603

    Icaras

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    Location:
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    #10
    I wouldn't move back to Windows if they discontinued the Mac Pro line, however I agree with you that it doesn't sound feasible for them to drop the Mac Pro lineup as they do have a healthy market in the pro audio sector.

    But then again, i also don't see the imperative importance of needing PCI express cards. These days you certainly don't need PCI express cards to produce and master music. The big, wealthy recording studios may have such a need, but I think the vast majority of recording artists out there will have everything they need in USB and Firewire devices to accomplish their work.

    As a record artist myself, I have never had to use a PCI card as well. My mixing board, sound device, and controllers all just use USB, firewire, and ethernet.
     
  11. nanofrog macrumors G4

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    May 6, 2008
    #11
    We may not get a choice though, given the direction Intel is moving. The enterprise hardware is moving to large core count system, far more than what the software used in workstations is capble of using. As the core count increases, that means either everyone will have start using desktop parts for workstation duty, or go with basically a terminal and run the software from a cloud.

    If we end up with desktop parts (i.e. the i7-9xx and Xeon 35xx parts are both LGA1366, and extremely close in design, as ECC is the primary difference in features), the cost of competing systems (say Apple vs. Dell,...) may end up with more of a price difference than there is now, as they could shave on memory (use non ECC), and the other components will be approximately par (presuming very similar capable components used).

    That cost difference could drive organizations to begin to rethink their software platform, and plan an OS/application shift. Money talks afterall, even in large entities with budgets individuals could only dream of (even if for a single system, when you put everything together, such as networking,...).

    The cloud method would be a mess for workstation users IMO, as it would mean we'd need much more bandwidth (i.e. large data files passed between the system and server), and the pay-per-use marketing strategy will be expensive. The cheaper system would quickly be offset by the monthly costs spent on the ISP and software fees for a given period of time.

    I agree, but the end may be coming, as Apple can't control what chip makers (all of 2 right now, as the other stuff based on ARM is nowhere near capable enough ATM). If they go with Intel desktop parts to keep the line going, they'd want to put in as little as possible, yet keep the margins high enough that it will price the system past the competition.

    In such a situation, parity will be obvious in terms of hardware, and the price difference will be much harder to explain away/swallow. Software investments would likely be the primary reason for staying, but users, particularly larger entities, would start looking at new software under a different OS to save on costs (plan out a switch to coincide with new hardware at some point).

    As I understand it, Adobe has no love for Apple, and 3D applications are already better under windows. For some reason, I'd expect this to continue, as Apple seems difficult to work with, even from a software developer's POV. And if they decide to jump ship Apple, there will be no choice anyway, regardless of hardware concerns. :eek:

    It's just not looking all that good to me.
     
  12. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

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    #12
    Long term, you may be right. Another potential nail in the coffin for workstations is when you couple the inability for software to catch up with enterprise CPU's with the increasing horsepower available in laptops (particularly as quad core parts trickle down over the next year or two) combined with distributed computing... it will mean that very few work loads won't be doable on a laptop or can't be farmed out to a server farm. Coupled with an increasingly distributed and mobile workforce, the desktop market will continue to dwindle into obscurity.

    As it is, the desktop market is pretty much isolated to gamers isn't it? The workstation market, if there really is anything left, is super niche as it is.

    However, there's no need to worry for the near future... the 2010 refresh will probably be boiled down to what will be just a new CPU BTO option (I suspect).
     
  13. Icaras macrumors 603

    Icaras

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    #13
    Do you think if the day ever came when Apple stopped producing Mac Pros, that they would open up the iMac to more user replaceable options, such as hard drives and graphic cards?
     
  14. nanofrog macrumors G4

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    May 6, 2008
    #14
    I wasn't referring to the 2010 models, but I don't think it's that far off. It's 2013 (not the next, but following Tock cycle) that I'm thinking of where it's a real possibility.
     
  15. hugodrax macrumors 6502a

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    #15
    I really hope they do not cancel the towers since I am looking towards replacing my 06 model in 2013 with the new 16 core Sandy Bridge architecture and 64GB of ram.
     
  16. TheSpaz macrumors 604

    TheSpaz

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  17. 300D macrumors 65816

    300D

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  18. Nostromo macrumors 65816

    Nostromo

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    #18
    1. I would say that Apple increased prices because of the weakness of Windows Vista. That could well go in reverse with Windows 7 wooing for professional users.

    2. The i5 and i7 caught up only with the lame duck Quad, and reduced the speed difference to the 2009 MP. The 2010 MP may be a much faster animal, that reestablishes the distance in speed again.

    The Mac Pro is the piece of high end gear that helps establish Apple as a high tech company. I don't see any signs of Apple withdrawing from the professional market.

    Rumors like this show up all the time (like announcing the end of Final Cut Studio). That's what it is. A rumor. You might just have created a new one. ;)
     
  19. Nostromo macrumors 65816

    Nostromo

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    #19
    Traveling at the speed of light, NOW is a rather imprecise term. :D
     
  20. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

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    #20
    I'm not sure what you are doing, but most likely 12-14 of those cores will be wasted most of the time. Even in a few years, those tasks that lend themselves to easy parallelism will exploit OpenCL where there is an opportunity to leverage dozens of cores. The ideal workstation of the future will be a high-clocked dual or quad core with a high-end GPU for parallel processing. And in a year or two, you will have that in a Laptop.

    I hope Apple keeps the Mac Pro around too, as I like the ability to use multiple drives in RAID and multiple monitors, but even that requirement might be met in the not-so-distant-future with a Laptop equipped with Light Peak technology, again rendering the need for a clunky tower unnecessary.

    EDIT: also, what on earth do you need 64GB of RAM for?
     
  21. Nostromo macrumors 65816

    Nostromo

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    #21
    The Mac Pro is the only option for professional users, who need to work on a display that is better than what the iMac offers.

    Better, because:

    1. Photographers and designers want to work with top monitors like the Eizo Coloredges, the HP DreamColor, the NECs. These are wide gamut monitors.

    2. Also: the glossy surface of the iMac gives noticeable eye strain, which makes it not usable for, let's say, ten hours of computer work a day.

    3. Professionals need more hard drive options, RAID options, more RAM.

    The Mac Pro serves a core clientele of photographers, filmmakers, sound professionals, and designers. Not to speak of the hard core computer fans and gamers. They represent the elite status Apple displays in its products. These are the people without whom the whole switching campaign wouldn't have worked.

    Word of mouth and grassroots marketing (which is very valuable and hard to create) heavily relies on the core clientele. Apple will be very careful to drive these away.

    The average consumer will without a second thought throw their iPhone away and get a google phone or a different media player.

    So, I actually expect pretty good offerings in the Mac Pro 2010.

    (I hope I won't get disappointed)

    Regarding the Mac Pro audio issues: Apple has some quality control problems it has to solve. Every company comes into a stage of hubris, where it is likely that the next step is the fall. Just google what Toyota's CEO was saying to this effect.

    Apple IS in a state of hubris, and the quality problems it has are just an expression of this. Just think of the screen flickering issues and the flash playback in the newest 27" iMacs.

    I hope they sleep off the hangover they got from the iPod and iPhone success. Just remember: ten years back Apple was on the brink of bankruptcy.
     
  22. akadmon macrumors 68010

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    Aug 30, 2006
    Location:
    New England
    #22
    Let's face it, we're all headed to the cloud sooner rather than later! Twenty, maybe as few as ten years from now we'll be able to pass stuff to/from the cloud at rates that are an order of magnitude faster than what today's hardware can deliver. All anybody will need then will be an input device (a virtual keyboard that can be mapped onto any surface) and some sort of 3D holographic display. Looking further down the road, even these will become obsolete when our brains get hooked up to the cloud directly. Yes folks, in the future reading someone else's mind will not be just a figure of speech. But I digress. I'm looking forward to getting a MP in 2012. Probably my second to last "computer".
     
  23. Nostromo macrumors 65816

    Nostromo

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    #23
    And computers will be SO small.

    Damn. Where did I put my Mac Pro?

    Oh! I stuck it on my ring finger!
     
  24. Big Boss Man macrumors regular

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    Oct 27, 2006
    #24
    A Pro Tools HD system requires PCI express cards. That right there would eliminate most pro studios. If you want to run the Apogee Symphony system you also need PCI express. If you want to use the Universal Audio UAD-2 plug-ins, you need PCI express. I am running Logic on a MBP right now, but I was planning on moving to a Mac Pro with the Apogee Symphony system and the UAD-2 PCI-e plug-ins.
     
  25. xgman macrumors 601

    xgman

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    #25
    It's a good thing you guys aren't in charge of Apple marketing or future trends in computing. :rolleyes:
     

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