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Amid reports Monday morning that Oracle has won the battle with Microsoft to acquire TikTok's U.S. operations, China's state-run English TV channel is claiming that no sale with any U.S. buyer will go ahead (via Reuters).

tiktok-logo.jpg
ByteDance will not sell TikTok's U.S. operations to Oracle Corp ORCL.N or Microsoft Corp MSFT.O and will not give the source code for the video platform to any U.S. buyers, China's state-run English television channel CGTN reported on Monday, citing sources.

People familiar with the matter told Reuters that ByteDance abandoned the sale of TikTok in the United States and decided to pursue a partnership with Oracle in hopes of avoiding a U.S. ban while appeasing the Chinese government.

ByteDance declined to comment on CGTN’s report.
A source also told the South China Morning Post that the tech upstart has decided not to sell or transfer the source code behind its popular video app.

The development follows a report from The Wall Street Journal on Sunday evening that claimed database software and cloud systems giant Oracle had closed the deal moments after Microsoft announced it had been rejected. The deal reportedly stopped short of an outright acquisition of all assets and intellectual property, with TikTok considering Oracle as a "trusted tech partner" instead.

In a blog post following the news, Microsoft wrote:
"ByteDance let us know today they would not be selling TikTok's US operations to Microsoft. We are confident our proposal would have been good for TikTok’s users while protecting national security interests. To do this, we would have made significant changes to ensure the service met the highest standards for security, privacy, online safety, and combatting disinformation, and we made these principles clear in our August statement. We look forward to seeing how the service evolves in these important areas."
Microsoft was originally regarded as the frontrunner in acquisition talks with TikTok's China-based parent company, ByteDance, and provided a formal proposal that would have involved the purchase of TikTok's operations in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand.

Bloomberg on Monday cited sources claiming that terms being discussed between ByteDance and Oracle were "still evolving," but that one of the options being explored could see Oracle take a stake in a newly formed U.S. business while serving as TikTok's U.S. technology partner and housing the video app's data in Oracle's cloud servers.

Offers from both parties reportedly valued the U.S. business at about $25 billion, but that was said to be before Chinese officials weighed in with new rules imposing limits on technology exports.

Any deal would still need to be reviewed by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), a U.S. government group chaired by the Treasury Secretary that studies corporate mergers for national security reasons.

President Donald Trump issued an executive order in mid-August demanding that ByteDance sell its U.S. operations within 90 days. Trump required ByteDance to announce its plan for the sale of TikTok in the U.S. by September 20 and complete a deal by November 12. The U.S. government will ban the Chinese video app by September 29 on national security grounds if it fails to submit its plan. TikTok unsuccessfully sued against the ban order in late August.

Note: Due to the political or social nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Political News forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

Article Link: Oracle Reportedly Agrees Deal for TikTok's US Operations, But Chinese Media Cast Doubt on Any Sale
 

ph001bi

macrumors 6502
May 26, 2015
481
987
London


Amid reports Monday morning that Oracle has won the battle with Microsoft to acquire TikTok's U.S. operations, China's state-run English TV channel is claiming that no sale with any U.S. buyer will go ahead (via Reuters).

tiktok-logo.jpg
A source also told the South China Morning Post that the tech upstart has decided not to sell or transfer the source code behind its popular video app.

The development follows a report from The Wall Street Journal on Sunday evening that claimed database software and cloud systems giant Oracle had closed the deal moments after Microsoft announced it had been rejected. The deal reportedly stopped short of an outright acquisition of all assets and intellectual property, with TikTok considering Oracle as a "trusted tech partner" instead.

In a blog post following the news, Microsoft wrote:
Microsoft was originally regarded as the frontrunner in acquisition talks with TikTok's China-based parent company, ByteDance, and provided a formal proposal that would have involved the purchase of TikTok's operations in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand.

Bloomberg on Monday cited sources claiming that terms being discussed between ByteDance and Oracle were "still evolving," but that one of the options being explored could see Oracle take a stake in a newly formed U.S. business while serving as TikTok's U.S. technology partner and housing the video app's data in Oracle's cloud servers.

Offers from both parties reportedly valued the U.S. business at about $25 billion, but that was said to be before Chinese officials weighed in with new rules imposing limits on technology exports.

Any deal would still need to be reviewed by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), a U.S. government group chaired by the Treasury Secretary that studies corporate mergers for national security reasons.

President Donald Trump issued an executive order in mid-August demanding that ByteDance sell its U.S. operations within 90 days. Trump required ByteDance to announce its plan for the sale of TikTok in the U.S. by September 20 and complete a deal by November 12. The U.S. government will ban the Chinese video app by September 29 on national security grounds if it fails to submit its plan. TikTok unsuccessfully sued against the ban order in late August.

Note: Due to the political or social nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Political News forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

Article Link: Oracle Reportedly Agrees Deal for TikTok's US Operations, But Chinese Media Cast Doubt on Any Sale
Millions of teenage TikTok users are now wondering what the Hell is an Oracle?
 

Dwalls90

Contributor
Feb 5, 2009
5,225
3,503
Good. They should wait until the last minute of the deadline, fire all American employees and close shop. Do not give into bullies, especially if the bully is the the American government who apparently thinks it can dictate the world.

Unfortunately I have to agree. That's at least 1,400 more Americans unemployed, and Tik Tok was planning to employ up to 10,000 more Americans in the coming years. Not exactly great policy given the recession and unemployment numbers.

I'm not saying Tik Tok is totally innocent. Their apps seem to have a similar level of "spyware" that Facebook has. But if the US was truly worried about these concerns, then they would have taken serious action against Facebook after data harvesting and allowing 2016 election interference. Not sure why Americans feel fine if a US company or government has their information, but are up in arms if a foreign power does. In case anyone didn't already know this, the second any data is collected on you, you're extremely naive to think it can't ever be hacked or otherwise shared. This is why it's best that data isn't collected in the first place, regardless of the app or country it's run out of. If we're being honest, this isn't really about the nature of what Tik Tok's app or the CCP may be up to, its just more tit-for-tat foreign policy. Blame China for the virus. Blame China for Tik Tok. Blame China for taking jobs that are realistically never coming back to the United States. And you can't forget the fact Tik Tok embarrassed Trump after the Tulsa rally.

The US thinks it can go Cold War against China or countries that don't do as they dictate, and that's not a viable long term strategy. Starting to sound an awfully lot like Russia.
 

Shirasaki

macrumors G5
May 16, 2015
12,076
6,142
The US thinks it can go Cold War against China or countries that don't do as they dictate, and that's not a viable long term strategy. Starting to sound an awfully lot like Russia.
I’d say USA fails to realise they are just one step short to become another China, the very country they are very vocal against. Also dictatorship and authoritarian regime.
Obviously going Cold War against China is not a viable long term strategy. But yeah, things like this happened.
Time will tell.
 

Eraserhead

macrumors G4
Nov 3, 2005
10,433
12,251
UK
It appears that China expects that China friendly Biden wins the election in November.

Biden is “China friendly” in the sense that a country who has a complex economy favours the US not being governed by a moron.

That said I doubt they’d interfere as they generally don’t outside their near abroad as that isn’t their general approach.
 

MacBH928

macrumors 604
May 17, 2008
6,598
2,743
I can see USA gov. choices only making other countries build their own alternative Microsoft, Google, Apple, and Amazon. China will have its own thing, east Asia will have its own thing, Probably EU will have its own thing.

Maybe the internet(International Net) will become a CAN(Continent Area Network).
 
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ruka.snow

macrumors 68000
Jun 6, 2017
1,609
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Scotland
I can see USA gov. choices only making other countries build their own alternative Microsoft, Google, Apple, and Amazon. China will have its own thing, east Asia will have its own thing, Probably EU will have its own thing.

Maybe the internet(International Net) will become a CAN(Continent Area Network).

Lots of countries have been working on reducing dependence on American tech already. Including much of Europe, though the push into Linux desktops for government agencies has always been met with problems. I think going forward the world is waking up to the fact that thinks like Office 365 could suddenly be switched off for your company because you decided to make a chip in China instead of giving the contract to an American company.
 
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