Organizing

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by max2, Jun 30, 2017.

  1. max2 macrumors 68000

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  2. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #2
    I'd like to, occasionally make the effort as I get farther behind. The best single thing I've done, although I'm still looking at stacks of papers in my office, is getting a document scanner and moving towards electronic storage of bills and documents.
     
  3. Mousse macrumors 68000

    Mousse

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2008
    Location:
    Flea Bottom, King's Landing
    #3
    So you organize you documents the way I do, in chronological order. The oldest stuff at the bottom and newest ones at the top.:D

    My Boss calls it clutter, but my system works for me. It keeps the memory sharp because I need to remember what date a document was created... Oh who am I kidding.:rolleyes: The Boss is right; I'm a slob.:oops:

    I've made numerous efforts to organize my space. It manages to stay nice and tidy for all of 2 days before old habits takes over and there's a stack of paperwork piles up again. IMO, it's not a matter of getting organized. You need to develop the proper habits to stay organized. I'd like to hear any tips anyone can give as well.
     
  4. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

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    Location:
    Behind the Lens, UK
    #4
    When ever anyone tries to give you a piece of paper only take it if you really need it. If someone brings something over to show you make sure they leave with it.
    Review what you have kept regularly. No point in storing stuff that is irrelevant or out of date.
    The same rules apply for computer documents as well. Don't just fill your hard drive with crap because memory is cheap.
    It's photo with me. I go through spells of being ruthless. But then I get lazy and suddenly you have this big project to start reviewing my LR catalogue.
     
  5. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #5
    My stacks are ordere in the manner in which I piled them so there is a rough crono order to them. The idea is that as they get scanned, they will be ordered, but scanning is time consuming.
     
  6. jbarley macrumors 68030

    jbarley

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    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    #6
    I had a friend once who wanted me to help him "organize" for the PPWC.
     
  7. citizenzen Suspended

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    #7
    I like to throw things out.

    It has the same effect.
     
  8. Zenithal macrumors 68040

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    Sep 10, 2009
    #8
    Yes. Also, as Zenny #1 said, I enjoy throwing stuff I or we don't need out. I take great pleasure in tidying things up. It's as relaxing as a nice drive. If it's land related, I love being able to use my power and manual tools. You have no idea how fun it is to chop down a useless, unneeded tree and then go at the stump.
     
  9. jbarley macrumors 68030

    jbarley

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    Jul 1, 2006
    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    #9
    I can understand a tree being unwanted maybe, "useless" never!
    Things I've done with neighborhood unwanted trees.

    82-BigMapleWinged-Bowl800-lg.jpg manitoba-maple-salad-bowl-13-wide-5-and-one-half-inches-deep-1116.jpg
    and if all else fails... firewood.jpg
     
  10. Zenithal macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #10
    The trees in question are useless because they're very small in diameter. They don't have much use. I do regularly cut down bamboo from some neighbors a few blocks away. The bamboo has been on their property/land for decades, long before they got there. They encourage people to come and chop it for their own use. It comes in quite handy when it's fully matured. Fantastic stuff.

    The most common trees here are oak. Far too many of them. They pose a hazard for structures.
     
  11. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #11
    I like oak, a magnificent tree.



    And, @Zenithal, I also have friend who derives enormous pleasure form the sort of physical activity you have just described in the above post.

    As for organising, I can do it, - and do it well - but it is not my default setting.
     
  12. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

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    #12
    Mrs AFB will often spend a day organising her craft things. She enjoys it I think. Knowing where everything is and having it all accessible.
     
  13. ejb190 macrumors 65816

    ejb190

    #13
    I am working on reorganizing my woodworking shop. It is a very small area and I have to make the most of every foot. I bought a bunch of parts cases and plastic tubs to start sorting things into. (I am a serious wood horder - so this is forcing me to seriously get rid of some excess.) I also have this grand plan to open up the closet under the stairway (mostly wasted space) to put rolling carts. My problem is I need to finish putting everything in organizers before I can use my tools - and I need my tools to build places to put the organizers... At least I have more room to work in the basement now that all the garage sale stuff is gone!
     
  14. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #14
    What kind of wood do you work, and what do you make or how do you work it?
     
  15. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #15
    I love oak trees for their beauty just not my first preference for furniture, too grainy, unless it's for the cabin. ;)
     
  16. ejb190 macrumors 65816

    ejb190

    #16
    I do a bit of everything. Pen turning, cabinetry, furniture, restoration, jewelry. My latest kick has been cajons (Brizilan box drums). I use a lot of different woods depending on what I am doing, but I love staying with the native North American species. The tropical exotics can be nice - I love working teak - but I question the long term sustainability and feel we need a better understanding of what's in our own neighborhood. I'm on a quest for some good black locust lumber - some would argue that black locust built America, but it's almost unknown in woodworking today.

    I agree. I'm currently on an "anything but oak" kick. I've used way too much over the years! I see four oak pieces (three of which I made) plus the oak floor from where I am sitting!

    Getting back to organization, if anyone has suggestions for lumber storage in a very small area, I'm all ears!
     
  17. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    Jul 29, 2008
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    #17
    Fascinating post, and thank you for your thoughtful response - I really enjoyed reading it. I don't know much about wood-working, but I love well made wooden products, be it cabinetry, furniture, floors, or anything else. Actually, I love wood when used as in interiors - floors, walls, ceilings - there is a warmth to wood that is hard to beat.

    My salad bowls are wooden, as are my chopping boards; and, I like tables made from wood, too.

    What about walnut wood? Do you ever use it?
     
  18. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    The Misty Mountains
    #18
    This is why my number one floor is either a red stained oak (which is not only tough, but attractive too) and at one point I had a beautiful dark red, real rosewood floor, but I suspect as the trees are wiped out in the Orient we'll see less rosewood furniture too. With most floors imo, you want painted baseboards to show the floor off, and not compete with the furniture. It's hard to go wrong with red stain though. Our friends had a brown floor, brown stained baseboards, and brown furniture, a sea of brown! Yuck.
     
  19. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    Jan 31, 2010
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    Midlife, Midwest
    #19
    I've made a couple of cajons (Make sure autocorrect is turned off. Mine has an annoying habit of turning my handcrafted percussion instruments into something entirely different.)

    The cajon is a great instrument for groups of musicians who like to play small gigs. Essentially it's just a smallish plywood box that the percussionist sits on. Striking different areas of the tapa (the thin sheet of plywood at the front of the box) with fingertips and palms a skilled player can create a very wide variety of tones, from a thumping bass to a surprisingly lively snare. Unlike with a full drumkit the percussionist can carry his entire setup under his arm, on the subway if necessary.
     
  20. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    Location:
    Catskill Mountains
    #20
    Yah when I'm in my studio it's as often to keep my gear organized as it is to use it. There are so many little things, and some of them may look alike but they're not (needles, pins, certain threads), different dye lots of solid color cotton fabrics etc etc. You can't let it get ahead of you or it can become a daunting days-long task instead of a little time set aside a few times a week or sometimes a few times a day.

    I know quilters who throw out any scrap smaller than 4x6" but since I love working with small scraps I only toss stuff smaller than .75 x 3 inches. To stay ahead of that means you have to discipline yourself to trim and sort scraps the same day you create them, and have functional storage facilities to make make maintaining order and access even possible. But at the price of some designer prints now, it's worth it. When I read about quilters throwing out 4x6" scraps, then I and my like-minded friends always wonder where those quilters live. ;)
     
  21. crf8 macrumors newbie

    crf8

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  22. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #22
    The biggest single issue I have with living in Texas are houses without basements, the loss of my built in 1500 square foot storage space. :( The walls of my garage are covered with other things. These kind of things used to be in my basement. As is, they are stored in a 10x10' rented storage facility.
     
  23. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

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    Location:
    Behind the Lens, UK
    #23
    Why do houses in Texas have no basement? In the U.K. only older houses tend to have them, but they are nothing like the sort of basements you guys have. Small and damp.
     
  24. D.T. macrumors 604

    D.T.

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    Location:
    Vilano Beach, FL
    #24
    Water table, cost (due to geological issues like limestone), no need for deep foundations given the climate.
     
  25. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #25
    Water table, limestone, cost savings, I guess. However where I live, we have sandy soil, no linestone I'm aware of at least in my neighborhood. In the Minneapolis area where I lived most of my life, full basements are the norm. I grew up in the D.C./Maryland area with houses that also had basements. However in the 70s a batch of houses went in without basements and we all thought, oh cheap houses. However the added cost of a basement in a new house does not add that much, really, maybe $10k. Well worth it because down here (Texas) usually you see one or two cars in the driveway cause the garage is full of junk. I did manage to get one car in our two car garage. ;)
     

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