Please have a look at my macbook temprature & rpm

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by hazhayder, Feb 11, 2018.

  1. hazhayder macrumors newbie

    hazhayder

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2018
    #1
    Hello, i recently bought a macbook pro 13 inch 2011 late. I bought it for development purpose and i am worried about its temprature. Please have a look at the temperature of my macbook and suggest me is it ok ? or should i do something in order to prevent ruining my machine.
    As you can see the temperature is about 91 celcius & rpm is 6200 as per smcFanControl readings. and Temp Monitor app showing 79 celcius. Screen Shot 2018-02-11 at 7.18.26 PM.png Screen Shot 2018-02-11 at 7.18.26 PM.png
    Note: I am using my machine on a hard surface so everything regarding ventilation way is clear.
     
  2. maerz001 macrumors 65816

    maerz001

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2010
    #2
    As u get temperature warnings it's not normal. How is the room temperature?

    You could open the back and use canned Air to clean the fans and air channel. After 7years there could be a lot of dust inside.

    Reapplying heat sink paste would be a second step.
     
  3. chabig, Feb 11, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2018

    chabig macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2002
    #3
    That’s normal when the machine is working hard, and it is—according to Activity Monitor. The CPU monitors itself just fine and will slow down if it needs to to keep its temperature within operating limits. Those two warnings you see aren’t from macOS, and should be ignored.

    You could clean the fans, as maerz suggests.
     
  4. Toutou macrumors 6502a

    Toutou

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2015
    Location:
    Prague, Czech Republic
    #4
    Nothing unusual. You're running an Android emulator and Android Studio on it, the CPU is working hard.
     
  5. macdudesir macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2011
    Location:
    Blacksburg, VA
    #5

    This is incorrect. It is most definitely normal...the "temperature warnings" are from a useless app installed by the OP...and they are making false statements saying "your computer is overheating." 80C is not overheating...over 100C is overheating, and the computer will not allow the CPU to get hotter than that...

    OP, your temperature and fan speeds are normal for what you're doing. When the CPU is working hard, the system will heat up, and the fan will come in at full speed to cool it down and maintain performance. Get rid of the temp monitor or at least the notifications and you will be much less paranoid.
     
  6. maerz001 macrumors 65816

    maerz001

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2010
    #6
    U r right. Thought it was Apples warning. There is one which I triggered once while having my MB in full sunlight
     
  7. Queen6 macrumors 604

    Queen6

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    Location:
    Flying over the rainforest at dawn - Priceless
    #7
    OP has a decent load on the CPU, so nothing surprising here for 2011 13" : Elevate the rear of the notebook will help a little, try Chrome canary versus Chrome, might lessen the load. Ideally you'd like to be peaking at 85C, equally not always practical and nor terribly detrimental if exceeded. High 90's CPU will throttle, exceeding 105C CPU will potentially hard shutdown.

    Also worth cleaning out the cooling system on a notebook of this age, just be mindful the fan blades are very fragile.

    Q-6
     
  8. hazhayder thread starter macrumors newbie

    hazhayder

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2018
  9. Queen6 macrumors 604

    Queen6

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    Location:
    Flying over the rainforest at dawn - Priceless
    #9
    Very much a "canned" response from the days when the 15: MBP ran very hot, equally some points will be of use to you

    Being an owner & user of the 15" MacBook Pro since forever; Over the years the 15" has frequently struggled with it`s thermals, especially when an external display is connected as the dGPU engages by default, internal temperatures soar, equally there are some steps that can be taken to reduce the systems temperature;
    • Elevate the rear, aluminium passive coolers generally work best (I use RainDesign`s mStand & iLap)
    • Increase base fan RPM to 3K or as much as you are comfortable with (MacsFanControl or SMC Fan Control)
    • Limit the dGPU`s usage with gfxCardStatus
    • Swap out Chrome for Chrome Canary as it`s generally more optimised for OS X and will extend battery run time, reduce thermals
    • Swap out VLC for Movist as again it`s a reduced load on CPU/GPU
    • Uninstall or block Flash
    • Install an ad blocker Wipr or AdGuard works well
    • Powered coolers are very much a "mixed bag" when it comes to Mac portables, you need one that has a high capacity (100 CFM minimum) and preferably a large single fan, this can help to keep the 15" internal fans below 4K which for many is good enough as often it`s this point and beyond where the fans become intrusive. Don't expect a powered cooler impact internal temperatures, beyond a couple of degrees
    • Older notebooks can benefit from cleaning of the cooling system
    • Retina`s can benefit from cleaning of the cooling system, as the heat syncs are far smaller and loose efficiency faster, due to build up of dust
    • Replacing the thermal paste has been hit & miss, some with very positive results, some with no improvement over stock. Personally I would only do this on a Mac Portable that was either very old, or one that I can confirm was definitely running hotter than stock.
    • If your MBP has a discrete GPU, it will fire up when an external display is connected as default, temperatures will rise rapidly.
    • Consider a specific vertical stand when using a MPB in "Clamshell" mode allowing for greater circulation of air. Some recommend inverting the MBP in the stand with the exhaust at the top & intake at the bottom (Retina`s)
    • Another option for static setups is a USB powered fan strategically placed so it blows across the MBP keyboard deck (air flow L-R above & below)
    The key to a quiet life with a 15" MacBook Pro is several incremental changes that can and do add up to reduce thermals. From my experience over the years if your going to push a 15" hard the fans are going to max out fast, with associated temperature & noise. If your using it with a moderate load, life can be made quieter. For the most part your MBP runs hot as that`s how Apple designed it, this is the trade off for thin & light...

    Like it or loath it, there's good reason why the majority of Windows MBP counterparts have significantly more cooling/vents, nor is it due to their design teams being inept. Apple simply place form over function first in many circumstances.

    Primary culprit here is the dGPU, combined with Apple's more aggressive fan curve for the newer 15" models, likely to stave off another round of mass dGPU failure. There is no way to disengage the dGPU when an external monitor is connected, all one can do is take small steps to reduce the overall temperature to a level where the fans will not spool up to an unacceptable level, generally 4K RPM+.

    The old adage still applies; it`s easier to keep a system cool, than cool-down an already overly hot machine. This being said it`s not strictly necessary, equally it`s nice to know that there are some options for reducing temperature out there, and a quieter life.

    n.b. based on experience with the Classic, Unibody & Retina 15" MacBook Pro, equally no reason not expect some aspects to help with the current 16/17 15" models...

    Disregard the points for the dGPU :)

    Q-6
     

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8 February 11, 2018