Retina Mac Mini?

Discussion in 'Mac mini' started by seniorchang, Jul 9, 2012.

  1. seniorchang macrumors member

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    Jun 14, 2012
    #1
    With the rMBP released and retina iMac rumors going on, do you think the Mac Mini will also get Retina this year?
     
  2. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    #2
    The Mac Mini does not have a screen included with it.
     
  3. seniorchang thread starter macrumors member

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    Jun 14, 2012
    #3
    I know, but isn't Retina about the max resolution capable by the graphic hardware?
     
  4. mentaluproar macrumors 68000

    mentaluproar

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    #4
    I really hope the OP was asking if the next mini could drive a retina-quality display at full res.
     
  5. charlieegan3 macrumors 68020

    charlieegan3

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    #5
    Don't you mean can we have an external retina display and a mac mini powerful enough to drive it?
     
  6. mentaluproar macrumors 68000

    mentaluproar

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    #6
    Mostly. Basically, for something to be Retina, it has to be at a resolution where the human eye cannot decern the displayed text for print. You can have a high resolution screen but with lower quality. Example: look at any dell laptop. Those pixels are the size of legos and you can easily see the grid dividing them all up.
     
  7. seniorchang thread starter macrumors member

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    #7
    That's what I meant. Sorry if that wasn't clear.
     
  8. mentaluproar macrumors 68000

    mentaluproar

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    #8
    If I remember correctly, the intel HD 4000 can drive a 4k display. Apple won't call it retina though, because if you have have that ungodly high resolution on a crappy display, it won't mean jack.
     
  9. charlieegan3 macrumors 68020

    charlieegan3

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    #9
    Thought so.:)
     
  10. qCzar macrumors regular

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    #10
    Considering HiDPI is built into Lion it's definitely capable; Using applicable iPad Apps I can run my iPad 3 as a Retina Monitor, though it's only 768x1024. It should certainly be capable of running the screen similar in size to the rMBP if it gets a spec bump this year.
     
  11. paulrbeers macrumors 68040

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    Dec 17, 2009
    #11
    First off, the Nvidia 650m struggles with the "retina" display in the new rMBP. At best, we can hope for an Nvidia 640E in the next discrete Mac Mini which will be considerably faster than the HD4000 that will come in the base Mini. What I am saying is while the GPUs can technically drive 4K screens, I don't think it will do it well. But then again, how many "retina" external displays are there right now?
     
  12. Chippy99 macrumors 6502a

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    Apr 28, 2012
    #12
    I am sure you know what Retina is. And I am sure you realise the sentence above is not what it is. (Although it is quite amusing because running the new Retina Macbook Pro at native res probably would make the text too small for the human eye to see it.)
     
  13. mentaluproar macrumors 68000

    mentaluproar

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    #13
    Please correct me. I was trying to regurgitate what I remember behind Jobs presenting retina at WWDC.
     
  14. Litany macrumors member

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    Jun 5, 2012
    #14
    A "retina" (220dpi) display 21" or larger costs over $2000 just to make, not including retail mark-up. Are you really willing to buy a display worth three times your computer? :confused:
     
  15. philipma1957 macrumors 603

    philipma1957

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    #15
    while they are very expensive today, 50 inch plasma screens in the 90's cost 20k now under 800


    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Samsung-51-Class-Plasma-1080p-600Hz-HDTV-PN51E530/20554042

    sooo that 21 inch 'retina' display will drop in price.
     
  16. goosnarrggh macrumors 68000

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    #16
    I believe you're looking for a definition like this: A retina display has pixels that are adequately dense (and a corresponding rendering engine in the OS adequately sophisticated) that you can no longer discern the individual pixels which work together to create images on the screen. The images themselves can be any arbitrary physical size; what matters isn't the overall size of the image, but rather the coarseness of the grid that is used to render the images.

    So, as far as the average-sighted person would be concerned, the text (and all other visual elements on the screen) would appear as though they were made out of solid lines rather than rasterized collections of rows and columns of pixels.

    The threshold for "retina" resolution varies depending on the distance you hold the image away from your face.

    For a fixed
     
  17. Litany macrumors member

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    Jun 5, 2012
    #17
    Which 1990's video system are you using with that modern display?

    Future prices don't matter. Using your "1990's plasma screen" argument, in 20 years the 2012 Mini will be obsolete and unable to run modern software adequately let alone at "retina" resolution.
    Try making a 1990's PowerMac play a 1080p video and you'll see what I mean. It can run the video player software and display the video, but it's antique performance makes it unusable for the task.
     
  18. Randomoneh macrumors regular

    Randomoneh

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    Nov 28, 2011
    #18
    Oh, really?
    Then how should we call a display that has such a high resolution that, when viewed at usual (normal) distance next to a display with two times higher density, they both look the same?

    Think about what retina should be again. Not being able so notice pixelation OR go so far that doubling the resolution / density would make no sense as it would look the same.
     
  19. rbrian macrumors 6502a

    rbrian

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    #19
    I use my mini as an iTunes server. It's plugged into my tv, which at 32", 720p, and 3 metres away, IS retina! There's a 46" 1080p tv in my future, which will also qualify, and I have no doubt my 4000hd video card can drive it.
     
  20. Randomoneh macrumors regular

    Randomoneh

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    Nov 28, 2011
    #20
    Here are your current TV and your future TV:

    [​IMG]

    Just because you can't see pixelation doesn't mean you wouldn't benefit from higher resolution. Just ask those who had a chance to see an 8K TV.

    At 3 meter, angular resolution of your 32'' 720p TV is 95 pixels per degree. 46'' 1080p would be 99 pixels per degree.
     
  21. HenryHealy macrumors member

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    Nov 1, 2011
    #21
    While it is a very capable machine, I don't see it being around for much longer.
     
  22. rbrian macrumors 6502a

    rbrian

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    #22
    Um, how would I benefit further if I already can't see pixelation? Surely that's the definition of Retina? Not that it matters that much anyway, I don't have much 1080p content to show on it, and it'll be a long time before I get anything higher.

    Thanks for the graph, it's surprising they're so close. It's funny to think how big that 32" screen looked five years ago when it replaced a 28" CRT, and how it now seems so small when I can barely read the HUD in most current games. I was going to get a 40" with a slim bezel, which would actually have fitted into a smaller space, but I figured, what the hell.
     
  23. Randomoneh macrumors regular

    Randomoneh

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    Nov 28, 2011
    #23
    Not the same thing. At angular resolution of 20, 25 pixels per degree, you can's see pixelation or pixel grid (not talking about aliasing).

    However, average person can perceive much higher quality in terms of angular resolution. Sense of realness of an object on display goes up up to about 200 pixels per degree. It seems like you wouldn't benefit much from those extra pixels but those who had opportunity to take a look at 8K displays say that content looked way more realistic than if it were on 1080p display.

    To achieve those 200 pixels per degree, you'd need to follow this chart.

    [​IMG]
     
  24. rbrian macrumors 6502a

    rbrian

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    Aberdeen, Scotland
    #24
    Fair enough, not having seen 8K I can't claim it won't be better. Even after seeing an iPhone 4 I was surprised how good the new iPad is. The point about the content stands though - it doesn't matter how good the TV is if I'm using it mostly to watch 525p or 720p content.

    Is the Y axis on that chart correct? Who sits 60 feet away from their TV? If it is correct, than assuming the viewing distance and screen size stays the same, in 5 years or so I'll get a 4k TV.
     
  25. ixodes macrumors 601

    ixodes

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    Jan 11, 2012
    Location:
    Pacific Coast, USA
    #25
    It appears you're out of touch:

    Dell Precision M4600

    15.6" UltraSharp™ FHD(1920x1080)
    PremierColor IPS RGB Anti-Glare LED-backlit Premium Panel Guarantee.



    http://goo.gl/DQ3GL
     

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