rMBP vs iMac

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by jazzer15, Nov 15, 2015.

  1. jazzer15 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2010
    #1
    I am looking to replace a late 2009 iMac. My uses include the standard day to day things (browsing, email, etc.) plus photo editing (Lightroom, plugins and a little Photoshop) and some music (digital audio using Garageband at the moment and transcribe software). Other things like Handbrake, iMovie or other video software are also things that I would use from time to time, but not necessarily regularly. Gaming is not a concern.

    The vast majority of the time, I will not need the mobility of a laptop, but every so often it might be helpful or needed. I was wondering how much of a difference there is likely to be for my use between a high end MBP and an iMac.

    In addition to providing the ability to be mobile in the rare instances when I need it, the MBP would allow me to get a separate monitor of my choosing rather than being locked into the all-in-one of the iMac (not that the iMac screen isn't great, but when the computer is outdated the whole machine has to go even if the monitor is still useful). The downside is giving up some power (and therefore longevity?) and that I would be dealing with docking the MBP and the convenience of a single, streamlined device on the desktop. But if there wouldn't be much of a noticeable difference in speed, it might be worth going with a MBP if only to prevent the need to prevent a laptop for those few times I may need it.
     
  2. jfriedman8 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2008
    #2
    I use pretty much the same software and did the same thing going from an '09 iMac to a refurb '13 rMBP 15 and havent looked back. It spends most of the time docked to my monitor, but I like having the dual screens, plus if I need to take my 600GB of locally stored files, I can.

    I've never had a single moment where I felt like this machine was not fast enough, or I wanted an iMac instead.
     
  3. Clix Pix, Nov 15, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2015

    Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    8 miles from the Apple Store at Tysons (VA)
    #3
    I have been weighing the pros and cons of this very question, too. I was very eager for a retina 21.5" iMac to be announced, but when it finally was I was disappointed in the tech specs and realized that I would have to spend a fair amount to upgrade to what I want: 512 SSD and 16 GB RAM in particular. The 27" retina screen iMac is just too large and too heavy for me. When I priced things out and compared between the new retina 21.5" iMac and the top-of-the-line 15" rMBP, I realized that there would be very little difference in the costs. Actually, I can speak from practical experience with regard to using an rMBP as a desktop replacement and also using an iMac as the desktop machine. For the past six or so months I have been using my 13" rMBP as a desktop replacement and have it on a 12 South stand which is great for then sliding the wireless BT keyboard under when I'm not using it. I use a Magic Mouse 2 and also the new Magic keyboard and the Magic Trackpad with it as well. (Just bought these; previously I was using the original Magic Mouse, Magic Trackpad and the two-battery BT keyboard.) I also have a 2012 iMac which is perfectly good, works just fine, but the rMBP with its speed has spoiled me and the iMac feels so slow now, especially upon bootup. I still use the iMac, though, from time to time and at the moment it is still the machine into which I plug in my iPads as needed for iOS updates, syncing and such.

    Having used both approaches, I find that I am leaning in the direction of going with the 15" rMBP and using that as my desktop machine. While it would be portable and easy to tote around the house if needed, it wouldn't be traveling with me anyway as I have the 13: rMBP and also an iPad for that purpose. The 15" rMBP screen is large enough for the things I do: mostly web browsing, participation in online forums, email, some photo editing (not as extensively as I have done in the past) and music and movies. Of course it's always possible to add an external monitor anyway. I have enjoyed using the 13" rMBP on the desktop but the screen is a wee bit smaller than really preferable for everyday use. Because I have other ideas in mind, I have chosen not to purchase an external monitor to use with it. In looking at the 15" rMBP again when I was at the Apple store a few days ago I feel that it would be just perfect for my needs. I would then transfer the 13" rMBP to the bedroom to replace the older machine I've been using in there at night.

    The new retina 21.5" iMac is gorgeous, the screen just stunning. It would be a bit heavy for me to deal with if I have to move it somewhere. When I initially bought my 2012 iMac and had to unpack it and set it up on the desk I managed, but with difficulty (I'm no spring chicken and my muscular strength isn't that great). It would definitely be sleek and elegant on my workstation, just as my current iMac is. It has more ports than the rMBP, but I rarely use more than one or two at a time anyway since I have wireless keyboard, wireless mouse, wireless printer..... Right now I've got the Superdrive plugged in because I was doing something yesterday with burning a CD in iTunes as well as adding a new CD album that I'd recently bought. I swap it around between machines so don't usually leave it plugged in to any one computer. I plug in the USB 3.0 memory card reader only as needed, and the same for external drives when I want to run a backup of my computer. I don't use Time Machine -- I prefer to do backups manually.

    The rMBP has nothing plugged into any of its ports -- I also have wireless headphones (I use these especially at night because I am in a condominium apartment and don't want to disturb neighbors late at night when watching a movie or listening to music on my computer). It's easy enough to quickly pop a USB 3.0 cable into one of the two ports when needed, and I do that with the Superdrive and the external backup drive. I unplug the machine periodically to maintain battery health, but leave it plugged in much of the time. It is nice that in the event of a power failure the machine doesn't suddenly go dark the way my iMac does. This is particularly important if I'm in the middle of writing a document. The top-of-the-line model 15" rMBP also has discrete graphics, whereas the graphics are integrated on the 21.5" iMac. If my external mouse or the external keyboard suddenly runs out of juice and needs to be recharged I can still use the rMBP's own keyboard and trackpad anyway.

    Something else which has occurred to me which also has me leaning towards the rMBP is the outstanding reviews of it, the fact that it is well-established and not the first generation of the MBP with retina screen. The 21.5" iMac is using a retina screen for the first time. Another factor -- and this one probably will sound silly -- is the "instant gratification" factor. I know that once I decide for sure what I want to do, if it's going with the 15" rMBP, all I have to do is get in the car and drive to the Apple store and pick up the model I want right away.....no having to order a BTO online and wait for FedEx or UPS to deliver, no worries about there possibly being something wrong in which case I'd have a hassle with either lugging it to the Apple store anyway for a checkup at the Genius Bar or even having to arrange to ship the thing back to Apple. If there is something not right with the rMBP, that machine is MUCH easier to transport to the Apple store and the Genius Bar!

    In summary: iMac -- first iteration of the 21.5" retina screen model; would need to order BTO online due to configuration I want not being available in store and of course not easily user-upgradeable. Machine is gorgeous, the 21.5" screen is gorgeous, but don't really need all the ports any more and if the screen goes bad or the computer goes bad either way something goes to waste. I also notice if I've been using the iMac for long periods of time that sometimes I get a crick in my neck; that doesn't happen with the rMBP, probably because the screen on that machine is somewhat lower in height than the iiMac's screen. I'm finding that my eyes seem to be more comfortable with a smaller screen -- then again, there is a larger difference between the 21.5" iMac and the 13.3" rMBP than there is between the iMac and the 15" rMBP. Since I have been using the 13.3" most of the time, my eyes are probably more accustomed to that smaller size screen now.

    Advantages of the rMPB: can purchase immediately, no waiting for a BTO, no need to deal with online ordering/shipping/delivery. Easier to transport if it ever needs a trip to the Genius Bar. The machine is portable and yet for me would also serve very comfortably in the role of desktop replacement. Discrete graphics as opposed to integrated graphics. In event of power failure, machine doesn't immediately shut down since it is battery-powered. Machine can be used anywhere in the house or out on the deck (although I normally use my iPad out on the deck). If later I were to decide that the 15" screen was not quite as large as I'd hoped, easy enough to purchase a separate external monitor and use that.

    I hope this helps you in your decision-making process; I think it has definitely helped me, writing all of this out! Looks as though I'll be going the portable route.....
     
  4. Mike in Kansas macrumors 6502a

    Mike in Kansas

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Location:
    Metro Kansas City
    #4
    I had been thinking this over for more than a year, in anticipating of my 2008 iMac finally giving up the ghost. Well, 3 weeks ago my iMac did in fact finally die. I was so sure I was going to go with another iMac. However, after spending some time with them in my local Apple store, I concluded that the 2015 15" MBP was just as fast for what I use it for compared to the 27" iMac. Actually, I found the SSD of the MBP noticeably faster than both the 1TB and 2TB Fusion Drive. If I were to get the iMac, I would want the 512GB SSD instead of the Fusion Drive. I also thought I would like the portability of the MBP and I was not wrong.

    In the end, I am perfectly happy with my choice of picking the 15" MBP over the 27" iMac. I enjoy the portability much more than I thought I would (I'm always on the couch now instead of sitting at my workstation). Plus I was able to get the MBP for at a local reseller for $350 less than what Apple was selling it for. For $500 I will be getting the 27" Dell 4K monitor, which will make for a killer desktop.

    Good luck with your decision!
     
  5. jazzer15 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2010
    #5
    Thanks very much for your responses!

    Clix Pix, given your thought process, clearly the rMBP makes sense for you. You make a good point about the ease of taking the computer to the Apple store if there is an issue and not having to order a BTO. The differences between our situations is that I have a 27 inch i7 quad core currently and would replace it with either another 27 inch iMac (which, as I'm sure you know, has discrete graphics and is more powerful than the 21.5 inch) or I would definitely buy a 27 inch 4K monitor to use with the rMBP (and I would go for a 15 inch). After having used a 27 inch monitor for the last 5 plus years, I don't think I would want to use something smaller, especially for photo editing.

    Also, since you already have both a mobile solution and a desktop, you have both bases covered! If I decide to go with an iMac, I am likely also going to have to buy a laptop at some point. I use an iPad for daily commuting and throughout the house and that is just fine. But every so often (although it really is pretty rare), I have a need for a laptop for mobile photo editing. Oh, and my ports on iMac are all used

    jfriedman, thanks for your experience. The thought of two screens is enticing. I also like the fact that a separate monitor would be height adjustable. The iMacs are very pretty, but they really aren't great for ergonomics unless you have the right desk to put it at eye level (as Clix Pix noted regarding the crick in her neck).

    This is a tough one. The best option, but certainly not the most cost effective is to get one of each :) If I go with an iMac I could get a smaller rMBP, which may not be quite as powerful, but would be more convenient for portability. If I go with a 15 inch rMBP and separate monitor, there is a bit of compromise on both ends, but it might be worth it.

    Thanks again for your thoughts!
     
  6. jazzer15 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2010
    #6
    Thanks, Mike. I was typing my prior response when yours came in. Can I ask what you are using the rMBP for primarily? I have been thinking that if I get a MBP instead of an iMac I also may find that I wind up using it somewhat more since I wouldn't be stuck in my home office. I could see myself doing some house cleaning photo editing tasks (like keyboarding) during commercials while sitting in front of the TV. Can't do that with an iMac :)
    For what its worth, if I go with the iMac, I would probably get a 512GB SSD. I do see that you are using a Fuji mirrorless, so are you doing a good bit of photo editing?
     
  7. scaramoosh macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2014
    #7
    It's pretty obvious, iMac for long term use, Macbook Pro for more casual use...

    If you plan to use it for hours at a time, the Macbook will drain it's battery and after a couple years it'll be shot.

    You said you don't need portability, well your phone will cover you for your needs there.



    People buy Laptops and always use them at home, I don't get it, buy a Desktop it's much better. Tbh though I wouldn't even go for a Mac for desktop use, Windows is much better and you'll get more for your money building one yourself.
     
  8. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

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    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    8 miles from the Apple Store at Tysons (VA)
    #8
    One can leave the rMBP plugged in, just unplugging it from time to time, which is what I do in order to maintain battery health and to ensure the battery will work well when I need to depend on it.
     
  9. kazmac, Nov 15, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2015

    kazmac macrumors 601

    kazmac

    Joined:
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    #9
    One of the best threads regarding recommendations I've read lately. Thank you all very much for the insightful posts. After a returning a dud new 27" iMac, I've decided to give that line a rest (especially with the unfortunate kicked-to-the-curb gimp on the 21.5".) So it's either Mac Mini or 15" rMBP. This thread makes an excellent argument for the 15" rMBP. I am about to return to school and my 2010 21.5" iMac has become very cranky under the last two OS upgrades.

    I've tried using iPads (excluding the new iPad Pro) for school work to no avail. Many times, my iMac is upstairs but lately I've needed the power of a full blown machine downstairs. I'll be looking at the 15" rMBP closely over the next month as I think that is what I'll be getting to replace this iMac. I keep stalling against the Mac Mini as much as I like the idea of that machine, the old internals just keep making me rethink this decision.

    I'll be using whatever I get for design (web, some photoshop, pixelmator), school (lots of writing, reading, research), video rips and minor edits so I know i"ll appreciate that quad core chip and the ssd drive. For me, the best retina screen has been on the 15" rMBP. I don't know how many times I almost walked out of an Apple store with one... I think it's about time I do.
     
  10. Mike in Kansas, Nov 16, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2015

    Mike in Kansas macrumors 6502a

    Mike in Kansas

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    Sep 2, 2008
    Location:
    Metro Kansas City
    #10
    I use it primarily for photo editing (both the Fuji mirrorless as well as a Nikon D300), video editing, email, web browsing, iTunes listening, Netflix and video streaming to my ATV, and document editing (a mixture of both MS Office and Pages/Numbers). I also do some light gaming, but nothing too intensive. I have a custom built PC that my son and I built last year if I want to do hardcore gaming.

    For photo editing, I was primarily using Aperture but have moved almost exclusively to Photos with the Macphun CK extensions. Video is exclusively iMovie as I don't make videos sophisticated enough to take advantage of FCPX. I have the 512GB SSD with a 1TB USB3 drive hanging off of it (iMovie library, last year's referenced Photos masters, etc.), as well as a 2TB USB2 "archive" drive that is only used for saved installers, very old video projects, etc. I will be migrating to a 2TB bus-powered USB3 portable drive so I can take my MBP and all my saved media everywhere without worrying about power adapters.

    I cook quite a bit and usually view recipes off of my older iPad 4. However, the MBP has replaced my iPad for that task, so I stream iTunes from my MBP to a BT speaker while cooking in the kitchen. Nice set up!

    The nice thing about the 15" MBP is that it is truly a desktop replacement. Sure, the 27" iMacs are more powerful, but I would suggest that there is nothing that you can do on them that can't be done on the quad core i7 MBP with discrete graphics (aside from gaming, and even then there is talk on here that the AMD adapters aren't as good for gaming as the older NVIDIA adapters). So for me, getting the MBP was clearly a "2 for 1" proposition. The suggestion that "iMac for desktop and MBP strictly for portability" is preposterous. Adding a nice external monitor, getting a dock and running the MBP in clamshell mode while plugged in gives you a true desktop experience. "Portability" doesn't necessarily mean "travel outside the house". I take my MBP with me all throughout the house. It's clearly a part of my digital life, and even though I have an iPad and iPhone, having that 15" retina display with you all the time is great. Plus, I am constantly working on images - editing, culling or keywording - so having my library (which is a mixture of referenced and managed images) with me at all times is important.

    If you go with the MBP, I'd highly recommend getting at least the 512GB SSD. Yes, it's pricey. But with the current lack of an upgrade path, you're stuck with it for the foreseeable future. I had a 256GB SSD on my iMac and found that I was constantly pruning it. I expect this to last at least 5 years, so buy for the long haul.

    Edited to add - a non-warranty battery replacement from Apple is $199. Not a trivial amount, but not enough for me to choose an iMac over a MBP just due to battery longevity.
     
  11. killawat macrumors 65816

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    Sep 11, 2014
    #11
    I could use the power of an iMac and do not need the portability of a Macbook (except maybe once or twice a year), however I absolutely do not need another screen. I have 1x 27 ACD and 1x 24 ultrasharp and that's it, my desk can't handle anything else haha. My current 2010 17" lasted me all this time (about 5 years) so I hope to do the same with a new box.
     
  12. campyguy macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2014
    Location:
    Portland / Seattle
    #12
    Chiming in with my plan, also having to deal with relocating to a new site from my home office. My work is some CAD work, office/accounting, and managing a small workforce. I had a plan to choose the iMac or a new rMBP once TB3 gets dialed in to replace my late-2013 rMBP; I use two Dell 4k displays that are mounted on arms. I need some mobility, but I'm anchored to a desk more often than not.

    My need for getting things done and being mobile were potentially addressed on Friday, when I bought an iPad Pro with the cellular option (I've put one of my VZW LTE SIMs with UL data in it, and it's pretty sweet!) and I bring a Logitech K811 keyboard and couple of Anker 15000 mAh batteries with me most of the time. I'm still setting it up, but it's suiting my needs for right now. While at the Apple Store, I admit to drooling a bit over one of the new riMacs on display... :p

    I also have a 2012 i7 Mini Server that I could tote with me, and use the Duet app with the Mini and iPad Pro. The Mini is one of my file servers, so I'm inclined to not tote the Mini with me but it's an option I now have...

    I'm now leaning toward a 27" riMac, but with a VESA mount - I already have the arm for it (a Herman Miller Flo Plus, with my rMBP on it, mounted with a laptop stand). The 27" riMac isn't that heavy now, especially without the stand mounted, and I have a couple of stands already - those that shipped with my 27" 4k displays - that are very light and pack easily. A carrying case for the riMac will round out my mobile plans if I go the riMac route. Besides, when was the last time you saw a thief running down the street with a 27" iMac tucked under his/her arm? ;) The iMac, paired with one of the Dell displays, both mounted on arms - yes, I'm leaning a bit more that way now...
     
  13. jazzer15 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2010
    #13
    Thanks. That's very helpful. It sounds like your use is similar to mine, so it's nice to hear that you find it to be a good desktop alternative. I am using a Sony A6000 and editing with Lightroom, Macphun CK and/or NIK and occasionally a little Photoshop. Garageband has been sufficient for my music endeavors and iMovie is all I need for any video.

    If I do go the MBP route I would probably go for the 512GB SSD for the reasons you mentioned. I might even wait a few months in the hopes of an update and/or getting a better price on the current model. The iMac still has a lot of appeal, but I can see where I could see myself enjoying using the portability of a MBP throughout my house as you have. And I really don't think I need 2 computers.

    Thanks everyone for the input. A lot of different things to consider.
     
  14. Mike in Kansas macrumors 6502a

    Mike in Kansas

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    Sep 2, 2008
    Location:
    Metro Kansas City
    #14
    I would have waited until 1Q16, but my iMac died and I really needed a new computer. I would have liked to have waited for Skylake and/or TB3 and/or faster RAM. Regardless, this thing blows away my 2008 iMac and pretty much any iMac up to 2012, and is on par with all but the most recent 27" iMacs. The SSD speed is pretty incredible as well.
     
  15. -A113- macrumors newbie

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    Nov 8, 2015
    #15
    If that's the case then go with the iMac, no point in spending a bit of extra money for a slightly less powerful machine. And as someone else mentioned, the MacBook has a battery in it which is just gonna end up dying, if you never move it from your desk then there's no point putting up with the bit of extra maintenance the battery needs.

    You can still do this with an iMac.

    This is still the case with the MacBook Pro, furthermore the MacBook Pro is going to become outdated much sooner depending on which model you buy.
     
  16. jazzer15 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Oct 8, 2010
    #16
    Thanks for your response. Out of curiosity if I went with an iMac, what would you suggest as a cost-effective mobile solution for the few times I actually do need a laptop, keeping in mind that my primary use would be photo editing? Every so often I may take a class or workshop that requires a laptop to edit pictures using Lightroom, Photoshop, etc.

    It's true that you can add a second monitor, but I don't know that I have space for two. I guess I am just a little gun shy because after about 3 1/2 - 4 years of owning my late 2009 iMac (which I purchased through Apple as a refurb in October 2010) I started to have some minor screen issues (thin transparent, moving lines noticeable only on certain backgrounds) that has gotten somewhat worse over time and can be a little annoying at times, but not nearly to the point of rendering the computer non-useable. If the same had happened with a MBP, I would have just purchased another monitor and I wouldn't have a space issue. But your point about longevity is well taken.
     
  17. Undo macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2010
    Location:
    Florida
    #17
    I'm curious about your setup. If you use Duet to connect your iPad Pro as a standalone display for your Mac Mini, does the setup sometimes fail to recognize the iPad as the dedicated display whenever you boot or wake the Mini? Does it sometimes revert to extended mode instead of mirror mode, so that you have to temporarily connect a standard monitor (via HDMI or other) so you can switch the display setting back to mirror to the iPad?

    Also, do you use Duet wirelessly, or wired thru the Lightning/USB cable? What's latency like? Thanks!
     
  18. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

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    Oct 9, 2005
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    8 miles from the Apple Store at Tysons (VA)
    #18
    Maybe these questions would be better addressed in a different thread, one focusing on using the iPad and/or Mini with a particular app, as that is not really relevant to the topic at hand in THIS thread.
     
  19. whodatrr macrumors 6502a

    whodatrr

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2004
    #19
    I went through a somewhat similar dilemma as you now are, a couple months ago, and ultimately decided two systems are better than one.

    My desktop has been an iMac for many years now, with the current one being a late 2012 i7 27". I also have had a 13" macBook Air as my portable, which I really hate, because of its screen (work-issued machine). I work from home, typically only spending two or so weeks a quarter traveling. My iMac has three big screens, which I now see as a necessity, and I probably do 80% of my work on it. This time around, as I was looking to refresh, I tried a maxed out open-box 15" rMBP to see if it could replace both the iMac and the 13" MBA.

    What I found was, though it was capable of replacing both machines, it was a compromise on both ends.

    As a workstation, it didn't like pushing my three big screens (actually, it couldn't). Even with only two 2.5k screens and one HD display, it seemed to struggle. It performed OK, but the fans were running very loudly the whole time. performance-wise, the 2015 maxed out RMBP seemed to be well behind my late 2012 27" i7.

    As a laptop, it was simply too big and heavy. Yeas, I did like the screen, but compared to working with three 27" 2.5k displays, even a 17" laptop screen would be a struggle. I found myself just not wanting to lug that behemoth around much.

    So, I'm keeping my 27" iMac, until the Skylake 27 refurbs come out. then, I'll upgrade it to newer specs. And I bought a 12" rMB as my portable (found a cheap open-box unit). I figured, if I'm looking for light and portable, might as well go all the way.

    What I also determined is that I do the majority of my major content production at y desktop. The rMB is fine for the browsing and minor editing that I wind up doing. If I really need to pump some work out, and I'm on the road, I wind up plugging my laptop into an external display anyhow.

    So, at least for me, two is better than one.
     
  20. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    May 3, 2009
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    Boston
    #20
    I've been contemplating this very action myself. Here's what I've been kicking around.

    The 4k iMac has a great display, but I think Apple has cut too many corners, at least for me. I have a 2012 rMBP, so its running a dGPU, the 4k iMac is only has an iGPU pushing all those pixels. I've read one review that states the iGPU does bog down at times. The other issue, is the storage, Apple opted for a 5400rpm drive for its stock configuration, and if you upgrade to the 1TB Fusion drive, that only has 24GB of flash storage as opposed to 128 in prior models.

    If I were to upgrade to what I think I needed, I'm approaching the cost of the 5k iMac, so that's the one I'm looking at.

    For me, there's a huge difference between the 15" display of the rMBP and 27" display of the iMac and so I'm definitely thinking that's the best fit for my needs now. I'll not pull the trigger until 2016 for a variety of reasons, and in the meantime, I may very well change my mind :)
     
  21. -A113- macrumors newbie

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    Nov 8, 2015
    #21
    Sorry for this late reply.



    I guess my only answer would be getting the 11" MacBook Air, I think it can depend on how demanding you are as a person really. If you want a cheaper suggestion either go with a Windows laptop (I wouldn't, but it's up to you if it can fit with your workflow) or a refurbished MacBook (I don't think it'd be as bad as it sounds and this would be one of the best ways to get it cheaply).

    If you want I'll tell you more about my experience with my 2011 11" MacBook Air (1.6GHz, 4GB RAM, 128GB) with regards to Lightroom, if that's the kind of info you want. I recently upgraded to a 2013 13" MacBook Pro (2.9GHz, 8GB RAM, 256GB) for photo editing on the go (With my 2012 21.5" iMac as my primary computer; 3.1GHz, 16GB RAM, 1TB Fusion Drive) because the MacBook Air didn't quite cut it, but it worked surprisingly well for a 2011 model so any 13" MacBook Air 2012 or later will probably be good enough for occasional on the go edits (One problem with the 11" is the screen is a little too small and low res). Hope this helps!
     
  22. jazzer15 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Oct 8, 2010
    #22
    Thanks again. I think an 11 inch screen would frustrate me, so that's probably not an option. A Windows laptop would probably actually work fine because, really, the only things I think I would really *need* a laptop for (other than for work, and I've got that covered) is for occasional photo editing and Lightroom, Photoshop and most of my plugins run pretty much the same on either OS -- but my Macphun plugins won't work at all. I could also probably get an older MBP refurb.

    I don't know, it's a lot to consider and I guess I'm a little more indecisive at the moment because I don't see replacing my old iMac as an urgent necessity. I've even been looking at desktop PCs. I don't really think I want to go that route, but when I see a fully loaded, easily upgradeable Dell for less than half the price of an iMac, even after including a 27 inch 4K monitor (not 5K, but that's not necessary for me), it does get me thinking. But then I try to remind myself why I switched to the iMac 5 years ago. Sorry, I digress ... :)
     
  23. -A113- macrumors newbie

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    Nov 8, 2015
    #23
    I completely agree, sometimes I wonder why I still have the Mac when I could build a much more powerful PC for a similar price. But then I'd need to figure out a new OS, lose a lot of the simple integration with my iPhone, the premium feel which I find inspiring, but very importantly Apple's support; when I'm trying to get work done, the last thing I need is to troubleshoot on a different OS/hardware and not be able to receive the same level of support that Apple can offer. Some companies may as well not have a technical support service...
     
  24. Mike in Kansas macrumors 6502a

    Mike in Kansas

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    Metro Kansas City
    #24
    I sometimes feel that way as well.... but then every morning I fire up my work Dell with Windows, and I quickly remember why I made the move to Mac 19 years ago.... I LOVE using my MBP (and iMacs prior to that); I TOLERATE my PCs.
     
  25. kazmac macrumors 601

    kazmac

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2010
    Location:
    in a Shaw Brothers wu xia
    #25
    Ugh, I really wish they did not gimp the 21.5" iMacs. The whole monitor thing is intimidating for someone who has used nothing but iMacs for almost 20 years now. The 27" is just not viable for me especially since finding out I won't be doing much design in this degree program. :( While I'd like to get my new Mac sorted before starting uni again, I may just hold out for Spring and see what Apple releases then. If this 2010 iMac goes before then, then I am definitely trying an rMBP.
     

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