Samsung Reports 1 Million Note 7 Users Safe After Recall, but Overheating Stories Persist

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Samsung today issued a statement confirming that more than one million of its Galaxy Note 7 customers affected by reports of overheating, and sometimes explosions, are now using devices with batteries "that are not vulnerable to overheating and catching fire" (via Recode). Following the initial wave of reports, earlier in the month Samsung issued an "unprecedented" recall of 2.5 million Note 7 devices less than a month after the smartphone launched.

According to the company, the one million figure includes devices issued as replacements in the recall, as well as Note 7 handsets originally sold in China that Samsung has deemed safe because "they used batteries that came from a different supplier to those that could overheat." Still, there are reports within China of exploding Note 7 phones that the company is looking into, which it says is not at the fault of the battery.

Samsung, in a statement issued on its China website, apologised to its consumers for failing to providing a detailed explanation why the smartphones on sale in China were safe, as they used batteries that came from a different supplier to those that could overheat. "Currently, the brand new Note 7 products that have been swapped in overseas markets are using identical batteries to those that were supplied and used for the Chinese version," Samsung said.

Samsung said it takes reports of Note 7 fires in China very seriously and has conducted inspections on such devices. Batteries for the burnt phones were not at fault, Samsung said, adding its conclusion was also backed up by independent third-party testing.
Despite the company's work at remedying the issue with the Note 7, reports are still coming in of overheating on replacement handsets. A few users in the United States and South Korea have reported that new Note 7 smartphones, which Samsung sent as replacements for the original malfunctioning devices, are "too hot to place next to the ear during a phone call." Samsung said that this specific issue "does not pose a safety concern" like the original recall, and compared it to normal "temperature fluctuations" on any modern smartphone.
"There have been a few reports about the battery charging levels and we would like to reassure everyone that the issue does not pose a safety concern," the South Korean giant said in a statement Wednesday, adding that the replacements are operating normally. "In normal conditions, all smartphones may experience temperature fluctuations."
In one case, Samsung has agreed to replace a customer's replacement Note 7, but it's not clear how widespread the faulty replacement device issue is currently. According to the company, more than 60 percent of Note 7 handsets have been exchanged in the U.S. and South Korea through the recall program, which could cost it between $1 and $5 billion, while 90 percent of customers chose to get a new Note 7 instead of seeking a refund or getting a separate smartphone model.

Samsung's problems with the Note 7 reportedly began when the company decided to push suppliers in order to meet an earlier deadline after learning that this year's iPhone 7 would have no major design changes. Earlier in September, Samsung America president and COO Tim Baxter apologized to consumers, stating that "we did not meet the standard of excellence that you expect and deserve."

Article Link: Samsung Reports 1 Million Note 7 Users Safe After Recall, but Overheating Stories Persist
 

Fall Under Cerulean Kites

macrumors 6502
May 12, 2016
272
850
Really bad PR all around. I just flew Delta this past week and both at the terminal and on the plane, there were announcements stating not to use or charge any Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phones due to the battery overheating / explosion concerns. I just thought to myself, “That can’t be good for Samsung!"
 

WRX-SRQ

macrumors member
Sep 5, 2012
65
205
Tallahassee
It only gets worse now that the company is issuing warnings that their top loading washing machines are prone to exploding too.

https://www.cnet.com/news/certain-samsung-washing-machines-exploding-report-says/

Things are not going well for old Sammy. I was a Note 7 owner. Seeing how the iPhone 7 was going to be so similar to my 6Plus, I choose to get the Note 7 until next year's iPhone, where I'd return to Apple. After the debacle and getting an S7 edge, which I hated, I returned it and had T-Mobile order me an iPhone 7.

Now with a lease upgrade program, I'll just use this iPhone 7 until the iPhone 8/iPhone X. Samsung blew their opportunity to keep me as a customer.
 

keysofanxiety

macrumors G3
Nov 23, 2011
9,536
25,262
Aahh, old memories are flooding back to me. The Galaxy S2 creaming the iPhone 4 in benchmarks. Apple hemorrhaging users to Samsung and the Android OS. Samsung's growth being practically unstoppable. Waves of MR commenters proclaiming that the end is nigh, fitting in nicely with the disastrous OS X Lion. The uncertainly of a future without Jobs at the helm.

Half a billion iPhone sales later, one rushed Note 7 release, and one heck of a media storm for Samsung...

Battered.
 

coolfactor

macrumors 601
Jul 29, 2002
4,664
4,780
Vancouver, BC
A few users in the United States and South Korea have reported that new Note 7 smartphones, which Samsung sent as replacements for the original malfunctioning devices, are "too hot to place next to the ear during a phone call." Samsung said that this specific issue "does not pose a safety concern" like the original recall, and compared it to normal "temperature fluctuations" on any modern smartphone.
If I was the customer on the receiving end of this response, I would be very angry! Thankfully, I'm not foolish enough to buy anything branded as Samsung.

Really bad PR all around. I just flew Delta this past week and both at the terminal and on the plane, there were announcements stating not to use or charge any Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phones due to the battery overheating / explosion concerns. I just thought to myself, “That can’t be good for Samsung!"
Yah, and I wonder when the phones will be deemed "safe enough" for the warnings to stop, or if airlines will simply ban all mobile devices from being used to "improve customer safety".

It is curious why different batteries were used for the Chinese market in the first place? Logistics, or was Samsung deliberately sending lower-cost batteries to the West?
 
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Saipher

macrumors 6502
Oct 25, 2014
293
1,112
CA, USA
I can't understand why 90 percent of costumers actually chose to get another Note 7 device instead of a refund. Companies will never learn that safety, security and privacy should be their number 1 focus if consumer don't push for such with their wallets.
 

coolfactor

macrumors 601
Jul 29, 2002
4,664
4,780
Vancouver, BC
Things are not going well for old Sammy. I was a Note 7 owner. Seeing how the iPhone 7 was going to be so similar to my 6Plus, I choose to get the Note 7 until next year's iPhone, where I'd return to Apple. After the debacle and getting an S7 edge, which I hated, I returned it and had T-Mobile order me an iPhone 7.

Now with a lease upgrade program, I'll just use this iPhone 7 until the iPhone 8/iPhone X. Samsung blew their opportunity to keep me as a customer.
I couldn't imagine just jumping between platforms like that. All of my data, my apps, my workflow.... uprooted.

As for the S7 Edge, how would the Note 7 have been any different? Isn't it the exact same user experience, other than a larger screen?
 

Floatingworks

macrumors newbie
Mar 15, 2016
27
17
And the Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge models appear to be exploding at an exponential rate. There were at least two incidents that made the news yesterday.

According to the details of the following incident, a woman actually sent the device to Samsung to get repaired, and they sent it back to her without fixing the issue or giving her a new phone. The device exploded next to her bed.

http://www.newsnet5.com/news/samsung-phone-sparks-house-fire-in-painesville
 

Tycho24

Suspended
Aug 29, 2014
2,071
1,394
Florida
I can't understand why 90 percent of costumers actually chose to get another Note 7 device instead of a refund. Companies will never learn that safety, security and privacy should be their number 1 focus if consumer don't push for such with their wallets.
Oh, that sounds really really really impossibly hard to believe??!!
Huh. Maybe it's because that outlandish statistic is Samsung's lie.

http://www.pcmag.com/news/348028/most-galaxy-note-7-owners-getting-a-refund-or-iphone

PC Mag's study found that over 60% of returns are NOT for a Samsung device whatsoever.
 

Stratus Fear

macrumors 6502a
Jan 21, 2008
528
188
Atlanta, GA
Despite the company's work at remedying the issue with the Note 7, reports are still coming in of overheating on replacement handsets. A few users in the United States and South Korea have reported that new Note 7 smartphones, which Samsung sent as replacements for the original malfunctioning devices, are "too hot to place next to the ear during a phone call." Samsung said that this specific issue "does not pose a safety concern" like the original recall, and compared it to normal "temperature fluctuations" on any modern smartphone.
While I honestly hate the "-gate" stuff I can't help but feel a bit amused here and want to suggest "heatgate" and "you're charging it wrong" need to be said more around here.
 

kis

Suspended
Aug 10, 2007
1,702
765
Switzerland
0 percent of devices in Switzerland have been exchanged because Samsung hasn't delivered any replacement devices to the local providers. I guess it's time to hire a lawyer now - had to return the phone to Swisscom almost a month ago and still haven't received a replacement. Swisscom has no idea when replacements will be arriving.
 
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mac4good84

macrumors regular
Feb 11, 2012
236
147
And the Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge models appear to be exploding at an exponential rate. There were at least two incidents that made the news yesterday.

According to the details of the following incident, a woman actually sent the device to Samsung to get repaired, and they sent it back to her without fixing the issue or giving her a new phone. The device exploded next to her bed.

http://www.newsnet5.com/news/samsung-phone-sparks-house-fire-in-painesville
Really? Yikes. I saw a pic yesterday of the guy who posted his phone and MacBook that was also damaged by it and yeah, that thing looked torched. Are these phones or grenades?
 
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WRX-SRQ

macrumors member
Sep 5, 2012
65
205
Tallahassee
I couldn't imagine just jumping between platforms like that. All of my data, my apps, my workflow.... uprooted.

As for the S7 Edge, how would the Note 7 have been any different? Isn't it the exact same user experience, other than a larger screen?
No, it's running an older version of TouchWiz and despite the processor and RAM, I was getting lag, delays on apps opening and even apps shutting down repeatedly. If anything, I learned a lesson and why the statement "Apple products just work" is so very true.
 

2457282

Suspended
Dec 6, 2012
3,327
3,014
It only gets worse now that the company is issuing warnings that their top loading washing machines are prone to exploding too.

https://www.cnet.com/news/certain-samsung-washing-machines-exploding-report-says/

Things are not going well for old Sammy. I was a Note 7 owner. Seeing how the iPhone 7 was going to be so similar to my 6Plus, I choose to get the Note 7 until next year's iPhone, where I'd return to Apple. After the debacle and getting an S7 edge, which I hated, I returned it and had T-Mobile order me an iPhone 7.

Now with a lease upgrade program, I'll just use this iPhone 7 until the iPhone 8/iPhone X. Samsung blew their opportunity to keep me as a customer.
I saw this on the news last night and thought the same thing. Samsung has really lost the quality control. Phones were attributed to a race to beat Apple. But with the washing machines what is the excuse? Maybe their leaders have simply become lazy. Don't know. But that they are having problems across disparate lines of business could be a total coincidence or a sign of a more problematic management issue.
 
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