Should I buy this 4,1 Mac Pro?

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by Inutopia, Jun 4, 2015.

  1. Inutopia, Jun 4, 2015
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2015

    Inutopia macrumors 6502

    Inutopia

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2009
    Location:
    South of Heaven
    #1
    Hi folks,

    I have been looking to upgrade my 3,1 Octo 2.8 soon and have the chance to buy this for £400:

    Apple Mac Pro "Eight Core" 2.66 (2009/Nehalem)
    6GB Ram
    640GB HDD

    Its all stock as far as I know, so 6Gb of ram and a 640GB hard drive. I'd be upgrading these heavily. What do you think, decent deal for £400?

    Also, am I right in thinking that this model can be firmware upgraded into a 5,1 and then I could add a pair of processors like this:

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Intel-Xeo...246?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item35e77e8166

    And also use 1333Mhz ram on it? Would this make the machine exactly the same as a 2012 5,1 Mac Pro?

    Thanks for any advice and help you can offer! :)
     
  2. h9826790 macrumors 604

    h9826790

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2014
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    #2
    £400? IMO, that's very good deal for a dual CPU 4,1.

    Yes, most 4,1 firmware can be upgraded to 5,1, and make them virtually identical to the 2012 model. However, the CPU upgrade won't be easy at all. Please study that carefully before action.

    My advice is to check if that's a real dual CPU 4,1. This price seems too good to be true.
     
  3. mcnallym macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    #3
    Looks a good price to me especially if is a Dual Socket 4,1.

    The main issue with the Dual 4,1 was that used lidless CPU's so either need to be very careful maybe find some spacers to account for the extra height of the IHS on a retail CPU or you can purchase delidded CPU's from people that will remove the Heat Spreader from the CPU for you.
     
  4. Inutopia thread starter macrumors 6502

    Inutopia

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2009
    Location:
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    #4
    Yea I thought that. I emailed the guy to check and he says its a dual CPU model.

    I did a bit of reading and with the CPUs, it seems to be a case of to de-lid or not to de-lid. Both seem to have risks associated with them and both seem like something that would require care and consideration.

    Any link for someone in the UK whois selling de-lidded CPUs? I saw some on ebay but that were in the US.

    Cheers,
     
  5. DNComputers macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
    Location:
    USA
    #5
    £400 is a very good price, even in the US that would be a good price, most in good condition go for $750 (£500) or more. I know UK is usually quite a bit higher, so it does seem too good to be true. I'd buy at that price even with some major case damage. I suggest you don't waste anymore time, and buy the unit.

    The processor you linked is the correct CPU, and should work just fine. You'll be able to run 1333MHz RAM if you upgrade to that processor. You could go a little higher to the X5690 if you want, but at the current prices the X5675 may be a better deal. You may also look at the X5670 if you can find that locally, it's sometimes quite a bit cheaper.


    There are risks both ways, so you'll want to do research and decide what you're comfortable with. Delidded will cost more, but has less risk and is easier. Lidded will save you money, and in the end the result is the same (unless you wanted to undo the upgrade for some reason) Since there is no longer a warranty, and unlikely to be any kind of extended support that is no longer an issue. The main problem with lidded is over tightening, and you have to find the thermal pad and maybe some washers.

    International shipping either way should not be an issue, but you do have to pay taxes and the extra shipping, so expect to pay $50-$100 extra. I ship internationally without any problems, but it takes about 2 weeks to get to the UK. There are also services that reship (one I'm familiar with is shipito.com I've heard from buyers who like it, but no other experience)
     
  6. Inutopia thread starter macrumors 6502

    Inutopia

    Joined:
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    Location:
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    #6
    Hey, thanks for the advice! Is that you I see on ebay selling upgrade kits? I think I recognise the name is all...

    I'm gonna have to wait a bit I think, the unit is some distance away and I have business over the next couple of days. Hopefully its still there when I'm freed up.

    Good info on the processors too, I was looking at the fast quad core model too, I think maybe the X5677? This looks good as it's got the high clock speed that I'm looking for and although it's only a quad I'm not sure I need 12 cores for the work I do.

    That being said I'm looking for this to be used for another 5 years or so (all the usual upgrades will be applied like GPU, SSD, RAM USB 3) so maybe it's worth going with the full X5690 route just now? Seems the tasks I use the multiple threads for are increasingly moving to the GPU though!
     
  7. DNComputers macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
    Location:
    USA
    #7
    Yes, I do sell the upgrade kits.

    I've never tried personally, but the X5677 should work fine, others say they have used it. At the price today (looks like it's around $50) that may be a good option. My only hesitation would be with each time you try to upgrade it (and you'd likely upgrade later) you run the risk of damaging the board. If you're careful, this is not a large risk, but something to be aware of. If you do go with this CPU, I think you'd want to be comfortable using lidded processors. Delidding would probably end up costing you $100 extra when it's all done, and with cpus that cheap, it doesn't seem worth it, plus any reuse value is gone as only the Mac Pro uses the delidded cpus.

    I'd buy the dual model you were looking at if there's any chance of that, that's a very good deal, I don't think you'll see a deal like that again for a long time.

    If you do end up missing out, and don't need 12 cores, maybe getting the single CPU model with a single 6core CPU would work. The single cpu model is usually about 30-50% cheaper in my experience. With the single you don't have to worry about delidded cpus, (they are all lidded) so the upgrade is easier. Maybe someday the dual tray (and CPUs) will get cheaper and you can upgrade at that time if that becomes a bottleneck.
     
  8. lexR macrumors regular

    lexR

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2013
    Location:
    UK
    #8
    exactly the same spec as the one i bought about 2 years ago fro £800 so i think £400 is a great price!! my cMP has been heavily modded since then and I'm very happy with it... just make sure you can see it working first o_O:) best of luck
     
  9. Inutopia thread starter macrumors 6502

    Inutopia

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2009
    Location:
    South of Heaven
    #9
    Hey all,

    Thanks for the advice! I picked up the machine today. Managed to get it for £370 as there is a slight whirr coming from the front CPU tray fan :) Checked eBay and should be able to replace this cheaply.

    The previous owner had never even opened the case in all the time he'd had it (since new) and it's in completely stock, completely pristine condition! It isn't even dusty inside, their house must be a bit cleaner than mine :)

    Now for some serious upgrading!!! @DNComputers, can you provide CPUs other than the ones in your listings?

    Also, I like the idea of connecting my existing SSD to the PCI bus with one of those Velocity cards, but I can't seem to find them in the UK. Is there a good alternative that is as cheap as they seem to be?

    Cheers :)
     
  10. h9826790 macrumors 604

    h9826790

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2014
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    #10
    For the SSD PCIe card, don't go for the cheap alternative. Unless those are reported good choice by other user.

    1) Their speed usually a bit slower. There is no point to buy something for speed (250MB/s faster than SATA2), but end up only 100MB/s faster.

    2) May not be bootable, which is one of the main use of SSD (to speed up the system).

    3) May cause all sorts of instability. Unless your computer is for fun only, and you love to troubleshoot it. Otherwise, it's not fun at all to have a unstable computer.

    4) Worse case, not compatible, which may become a total waste of time and money.

    If you really can't find the card and don't want to pay too much extra money to buy it via internet. I suggest that you simply plug the SSD in the optical bay first. You can leave it hang at there. It won't vibrate, no need to mount it to anything. And only consider the upgrade if you feel that the SSD speed still your bottleneck. For small files random read / write (e.g. OS operation), it's really hard to tell if there is any difference between SATA 2 and SATA 3 speed.
     
  11. Inutopia thread starter macrumors 6502

    Inutopia

    Joined:
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    Location:
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    #11
    Yea, that's where I have mine just now, in the ODD bay without a bracket. To be honest I wasn't bothered about the additional speed, it was more to get it mounted in a nicer more accessible spot. The ODD cage is a pain to access. All my disk bays will be full with spinning disks. Can you think of any other suggestions for that?

    Thanks :)
     
  12. DNComputers macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
    Location:
    USA
    #12
    Wow, congrats on the great deal.

    I read through the rules, and I think this is okay, since asked specifically? Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, I'll be glad to delete/edit this post
    I have these two in stock, it's cheaper to buy through my site than ebay because of fees.
    https://www.dncomputers.com/mac-pro...pgrade-kit-to-12-core-3-06ghz-xeon-x5675.html
    https://www.dncomputers.com/mac-pro...-kit-to-12-core-3-46ghz-xeon-x5690-slbvx.html

    As you're in the UK, ebay does handle taxes with the Global Shipping Program, (so they will estimate this and show you upfront what this will be) as I understand, this is higher than you'd expect to pay otherwise. If you buy internationally, set a little aside for the customs fees you'll be expected to pay on delivery.


    This is also an option, although it's aimed at the XServe, it will work in the 4,1 Mac Pro as well. I would not recommend this unless you wanted to stay on the 4,1 firmware for some reason (This would be the best CPU that will work in the 4,1 without upgrading the firmware)
    https://www.dncomputers.com/xserve-...to-8-core-3-33ghz-xeon-w5590-mac-pro-4-1.html

    I can do any other compatible CPU, and I'm sure anyone else who delids these could as well if you ask.

    If you order the CPUs and have them sent to me, I'll test, delid, and send them back out to you along with a hex key for $85+shipping.
     
  13. Inutopia, Jun 7, 2015
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2015

    Inutopia thread starter macrumors 6502

    Inutopia

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2009
    Location:
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    #13
    Hey @DNComputers thanks for the continued help, you've been fantastic!

    I'm definitely going to be moving to 5,1 firmware.

    It's an expensive business getting a hold of the delidded CPUs! Don't get me wrong, I appreciate the work and risk that you and others put in, and absolutely believe that to be worth the money charged. It's the fact that it's all US to UK, and the importation charges are brutal on top of the base cost of the delidded chips :)

    I'd naturally prefer to go with a delidded set, and then I don't have to play games with guesstimating the torque on the heat sinks, not to mention it looks like you need to disassemble that little connector as it doesn't work with the increased height from the ISH. Hmm I dunno what to do...

    I'm not super keen on the idea of attempting a delid myself, I'm a pretty careful guy and experienced with building machines etc, but I know it's a process fraught with risk.

    Wouldn't sending chips to you attract importation charges when they were sent back?

    PS: MODS! Sorry if I'm breaking rules with this conversation, it's all my fault and not DNComputers :)
     
  14. DNComputers, Jun 7, 2015
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2015

    DNComputers macrumors newbie

    Joined:
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    Location:
    USA
    #14
    Yes, don't ship them from the UK to the US, then have them shipped back, you'd get charged all over for the fees!

    You could order them from a US seller, have them shipped to someone here, then have them shipped to the UK, you'd pay import taxes once.

    I am not aware of anyone in the UK that delids these processors, but if you can source the CPUs there it may be worth checking if someone does it, or maybe someone familiar with installing the lidded CPUs can just do the entire upgrade for you, which would eliminate the risk (some small computer shops will do this, and depending on the shop, they should warranty their work, and if they break your board doing the upgrade, they should cover it)

    Delidding the CPUs is not difficult, but certainly not risk free, especially since these are soldered to the IHS. I would very strongly suggest you not to delid a single set for yourself, the risks of damage would be far greater than just installing lidded CPUs. If you don't have another machine to test with (A Single CPU, or 5,1 Mac Pro, or just a PC that can run this CPU), testing the CPU before delidding would require you to install the CPUs lidded anyways, and without testing it, if the CPU was bad before you delidded it, you'd be out any possibility of returning it after you modified it like that.

    With the first 4,1 I got I wanted to upgrade the processors, but with so many guides with conflicting information, I was far too nervous to do the lidded CPUs, as the CPU boards were very expensive at the time (still are), and noone else was selling delidded CPUs at the time, so there really wasn't an option I was comfortable with. I was fortunate that I work on and sell computers for a living, and I have a lot of older cpus around, practiced delidding many cpus with various methods until confident enough to try on a cheaper xeon quad core, and after that worked, finally the X5690 that's in it today. I've never actually done an install with the lidded CPU, it still scares me to take the risk, so I'm certainly biased towards the delidded. The only problems I've run into with customers damaging things with the delidded CPUs, was caused by putting the CPUs in backwards, so I don't feel there is much risk. I am not the best person to ask about the actual risks with installing the lidded, but as I understand, over tightening is the big one. I think properly sized washers could reduce this risk.

    My suggestion is to figure out what you'd pay for the CPUs you want in the UK. Probably assume an extra $10-$15 for the tools you need (the screwdriver is easy to find, you usually need to buy a small set, but most hardware stores have it in a kit for around $5. You'd want to find some thermal paste, which should also be $5 or less at many computer stores, and the thermal pad) Compare that to what you'd pay for the delidded CPUs, and decide if the reduced risk is worth the extra cost. Since you're already spending time researching how to do the lidded upgraded, the time researching what you need to do isn't really a factor, actually performing the upgrade with the lidded CPUs should only take a little bit longer (you have to cut the connector, cut and add thermal pads, and possibly remove the tray and retighten in a few times while you get it right.

    The end results are the same. I have gotten some boards from customers who have attempted the lidded upgrade, the boards come with all kinds of bent pins, but so far, we've been able to repair all of them, so I think even if you do over tighten a little, it probably can be fixed (If this happens, I would suggest you stop pull the CPUs, take some pictures and get some advice before attempting to rebend the pins back, they are very fragile and bending too much will cause them to break off, which would require finding someone to replace the entire socket or living with a bad ram slot or whatever those pins controlled. With many pins being redundant, even a few broken pins doesn't mean it won't work.[/user]
     
  15. box185 macrumors member

    box185

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2013
    #15
    I started de-lidding the Xeon CPU's back in June of 2013 for basically the same reason - it was less of a risk for me to de-lid the CPU than to risk damaging the processor tray - especially with the custom tools that I fabricated in order to cut the adhesive. I did not consider selling them on eBay or elsewhere until I was motivated by Thomas Pindelski - that proved to be a good decision for me and my customers. I continued to offer de-lidded CPU's on eBay until recently because other vendors were ( IMHO ) charging too much for their offerings - this was especially true as the price of the faster Xeon CPU's deteriorated. My opinion has changed during the past few months - prices for de-lidded CPU's have come down - $100 for the service is a reasonable fee based on my experience with de-lidding. Trade that with your time spent trying to determine if installing lidded CPU's is easy or difficult or somewhere in between. I have recently seen about three vendors providing de-lidded Xeon CPU's on eBay, and DNComputers comments here suggest that he is well qualified to provide that service ( I have no connection to DNComputers even though we both appear to be located in Iowa). I want to thank DNComputers for offering the service on his website and through eBay. While I enjoyed hearing from customers around the world who installed CPU's that I de-lidded, I was in no position to grow that service ( due to full time employment ).

    http://forums.macrumors.com/threads/upgrading-the-2009-8-core-cpus.1633369/#post-17889125

    I would consider starting a thread on the de-lidding process because it really is interesting, but based on the liability issue ( Thomas Pindelski seems to have had a bad experience with the free advice he offered on his blog ), I think that is not going to happen. On the other hand, de-lidding a pair of Xeon CPU's is not really something that an individual should do to save $100 unless they have the time and resources to discover the proper way to do it.

    Based on my experience and feedback from my customers, the de-lidded CPU option is great for people who are willing to open up their Mac Pro, who can be comfortable working with computer hardware, and are interested in getting back to work. The only problem I have ever seen is that some people try to mix instructions from both techniques. It should be clear that there are guides for installing lidded CPU's and there are guides for installing de-lidded CPU's - these two guides should not be mixed together.
     
  16. JaguarGod macrumors 6502

    JaguarGod

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2010
    #16
    Well, the only experience I can add to this would be that I bought a 3.33Ghz Quad Core 4,1 Mac Pro and upgraded the firmware to the 5,1, added 32GB 1333 Mhz memory and a GTX 970 and have loved it since then. Since I no longer develop my Mac Racing Sim, I 'work' much less on it these days, but I do play a lot of games on it and have no complaints.
     
  17. Inutopia thread starter macrumors 6502

    Inutopia

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2009
    Location:
    South of Heaven
    #17
    Hi all,

    Cheers for all the additional replies, what a great community this is!

    Some updates: I got the machine home today and booted it up, no problems except the slightly noisy fan that I knew about, good times! :)

    Ran the firmware update and that went fine, machine reports as 5,1. Had to download the updated firmware but I think thats the same for everyone now.

    I saw a good deal on a pair of delidded X5680s (£300) So I've got those coming. I didn't want to risk wrecking the tray with out of spec CPUs, so now it's more of a straight CPU swap, which I'm comfortable with.

    Also got the following from various sources:

    32GB PC3-10600R (8x4GB)
    Front CPU fan assembly with speaker
    Arctic Silver 5 thermal compound
    3mm T-handle Allen tool
    4 port Inateck USB 3.0 (I have one already but mine needs separate power and this one doesn't apparently)

    I'll also be putting in my GTX 970 and a bunch of HDD/SSD that I already have, should be a beast! :)

    I'll let you all know how I get on when everything arrives, then I'll need to get on with selling my 3,1!
     
  18. DNComputers macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
    Location:
    USA
    #18
    I agree 100% with this comment, these are the only problems I've seen as several hundred cpus. One buyer even tried to put lidded in a 5,1 with a lot of extra thermal paste... those CPUs died :( PLEASE ignore almost everything you have been reading about installing the lidded CPUs or you'll risk damaging it.

    If someone else who is installing lidded CPUs reads this, do not follow these guides

    I'm not sure what that seller sends you as far as instructions, but this is an excellent guide if you like pictures:
    http://eriknaso.com/2015/03/21/upgrading-the-processors-on-my-early-2009-mac-pro-at-a-bargain-price/

    We did put together a video awhile ago, I'm not completely happy with it, but never got the time to redo it (thermal paste isn't applied as it should, didn't detail that you should tighten it down, etc)



    I'd be interested if there are other guides, I haven't searched recently, but I've not seen anything.



    @box185 Not to hijack the thread, but I find it interesting, we're so close and went about such a similar process around the same time. It's unfortunate you were not selling them when I was looking. I don't recall exactly when, but could have been after you did it. Had I known, I would have seen what you could do for me instead. I also never started delidding to sell the CPUs (I did also have 2 Mac Pros I was hoping to sell, so I was delidding 3 sets total the first time, but it was because I was uncomfortable doing the lidded cpus) The CPUs at the time were so expensive and my experience with selling MacBook boards or other parts says many don't do it carefully. Charging enough to cover that risk and fees would mean delidding would cost $300+ just to break even (at least how I estimated it) That seemed like a rip-off to the buyer.
    As the price for a single CPU dropped to around $350, so did the costs I'd have if a customer damaged the CPU and forced a refund (thanks ebay...), or the occasional international return, where I have to pay taxes to accept the item back I eventually tried selling one set before putting them in a Mac Pro and it sold almost right away, which surprised me. I did a few more, they kept selling. There were also far fewer problems than I estimated so I was able to bring the price down to reflect that.

    At some point after that I found your listing for the delidding service. If you still have time, it might be worth continuing with the delidding service. While I would do it if asked, this is not a service I want to do, and I don't think anyone else does this either. I'm not sure how well you did with it, but your risks should be lower.

    To doing a thread on delidding, while not difficult, I cannot think of a way an average person could safely delid, and I think you'd actually have a far greater risk of causing damage than just installing lidded processors. At minimum I feel you should have a few old CPUs to test with until you're comfortable. It'd be a bad idea in my opinion to do it without first testing the CPU, so you'd need another computer (PC) that you can test that CPU with. If there's a safe method that 'anyone' can do, I think it'd be worth doing a guide, or when the price of the CPUs drops to where destroying one isn't a big issue (probably not til the cpus are <$75 or so). I'm afraid if you detailed how to do it today, you'd just end up with a bunch of people destroying their CPUs.
     
  19. Inutopia thread starter macrumors 6502

    Inutopia

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    Apr 8, 2009
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    South of Heaven
    #19
    Yes, I'll be going for something like that. Thanks for the guides. Should be relatively hassle free, just like a normal CPU swap which I've done a few of in my time.

    There'd surely be a market in the UK for delidding services, at least for the next few years while there are plenty of 09 Mac Pros going about. As I mentioned before I support the prices charged for the process, the person performing it has to assume the risk of performing the delid, and thats worth money in my book.

    I heard somewhere that these Xeons are a bit more difficult, as the IHS is soldered on, any truth in that?
     
  20. box185 macrumors member

    box185

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2013
    #20
    In my experience, one problem is that some people are not aware that there are eleven capacitors under the lid along with the microprocessor. I have repaired several CPU's with damaged capacitors - damage that resulted from pushing a razor blade too far through the adhesive. I use a custom tool to limit the depth of cut - preventing damage to the components under the lid. With the adhesive cut, the IHS can be removed using a temperature controlled heat plate to melt the solder.
     
  21. AlexMaximus macrumors 6502

    AlexMaximus

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Location:
    A400M Base
    #21

    Hi,

    Regarding the PCI SSD adapter, you may want to check out this one here:

    http://eshop.macsales.com/item/OWC/SSDACL6G.S/

    In Europe, you can get it here:

    http://macupgrade.eu/catalog/owc-accelsior-p-1288.html#.VXhgXWBWtH8

    It's reasonable priced, boots OS X, but can't boot Windows with it...

    :)
     
  22. Inutopia thread starter macrumors 6502

    Inutopia

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2009
    Location:
    South of Heaven
    #22
    That sounds like a sensible way to do it. Is see the capacitors you're talking about, they're right behind the adhesive too, very easy to damage if you don't take proper precautions I'd imagine!

    In other news RAM arrived today! All 8 sticks seem to be working, I'm just about to run Rember on them to check properly. Feels good as I've not had that much luck buying mass amounts of RAM in the past, plenty of DOAs and ones that fail as soon as they heat up.
     
  23. Inutopia thread starter macrumors 6502

    Inutopia

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2009
    Location:
    South of Heaven
    #23
    That looks interesting! Much cheaper in the US, as per usual, but a bit cheaper than the Apricorn unit over here.

    Do you have one yourself? Does it have any issues with slow boots etc? I've heard of people having issues like that with some PCI-e cards, it's not clear if a PRAM reset cures this.
     
  24. AlexMaximus macrumors 6502

    AlexMaximus

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Location:
    A400M Base
    #24
    I used to have the Sonnet Temp SSD card (single version with extender/ not the Raid Version).
    I sold it because it does not appear in the option screen. So once you are on Bootcamp, you can't get back to your OS X drive. That was an absolute show stopper for me.

    After that, I got the OWC Accelsior S. The boot time is a bit longer, so you are right on that side. Here are the boot up time comparisons, taken with the timer of the iPhone 6:

    SSD Boot time on default SATA2, (MP Tray 1 spot): 45,89 seconds
    SSD Boot time on OWC Accelsior S, (PCI slot 3): 1,02.8 seconds

    However, the Blackmagic Disk Speed Test looks like this:

    SSD MP SATA2 Tray 1 slot // write speed: 258 MB/sec
    SSD MP SATA2 Tray 1 slot // read speed: 268 MB/sec

    OWC Accelsior S, PCI slot 3 // write speed: 504,3 MB/sec
    OWC Accesior S, PCI slot 3 // read speed: 518,2 MB/sec

    On this assessment, the boot time of the OWC goes up for 25%, but the read & write time improves a full 100%.
    For me its really all about the read time, so I am very happy with the result. Apps and programs start faster and Safari feels also a bit snappier. The computer get just a little speed up that is indeed noticeable. For me it was well worth those 65 bucks.

    I don't know if the Apricorn card performs better, however I could not find it anywhere in Europe. With the shipping from the US its a whole lot more expensive. For me this was a good option.
     
  25. h9826790 macrumors 604

    h9826790

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2014
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    #25
    Agree that the OWC Accelsior S is a good choice. However, it won't boot Windows, that's the downside when compare to the Apricon card.

    Anyway, with the Sonnet card, when you are in Windows, just use the bootcamp apps to choose the start up disk, then you can go back to OSX.

    Or use rEFInd, which won't affected by the Sonnet card.

    Or reset PRAM, if you are not running Yosemite with TRIM enabler.

    Or use bootcharm which will make you automatically go back to OSX on the next boot.
     

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