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In a wide-ranging interview with The New York Times' Kara Swisher, on her podcast "Sway," Apple CEO Tim Cook talks about Apple's feud with Facebook, its stance on privacy, Apple's legal battle with Epic Games, and possible future Apple innovations such as Apple Glasses.

tim-cook-apple-park.jpg

Apple is in the midst of a heated public spat with Facebook over privacy, particularly over an upcoming feature on iOS that will require apps to ask for users consent before tracking them.

The new feature called ATT, or App Tracking Transparency, coming with iOS 14.5 in "a few weeks," according to Cook, will force apps to ask users for permission to track them across other apps and websites. Facebook has argued vehemently against the new feature, saying it impacts small businesses that rely on personalized ads, derived from tracking, to keep afloat.

Tim Cook says he disagrees with that argument, indirectly saying that Facebook's point of view is "flimsy." Cook calls privacy the "top issue of the 21st century," adding that with tracking, companies, such as Facebook are able to put "together an entire profile of what you're thinking and what you're doing."
What [App Tracking Transparency] tries to get at is companies that are taking advantage of tracking you across apps of other companies and therefore putting together an entire profile of what you're thinking, what you're doing, surveilling you across the web 24/7.

They'll see a simple pop-up that basically prompts them to answer the question, are they OK with being tracked or not? If they are, things move on. If they're not, then the tracking is turned off.
When asked how the new feature will impact Facebook, Cook says he's not "focused on Facebook," saying Apple adds new tools and features every year that improves and doubles down on user privacy. Speaking more specifically to what actions may need to be taken against companies that track users, Cook says he used to be a firm believer in the ability for companies to regulate themselves but notes that's now changed.
Generally speaking, I think privacy is one of the top issues of the 21st century, and I think we're in a crisis. Years ago, I thought companies would regulate themselves and sort of get better. I no longer believe that. And I'm not generally somebody that is keen on regulation, but I think that regulation is required.

In a speech at a privacy conference in January, Cook strongly condemned social media companies that fuel conspiracy theories thanks to their algorithms. Cook says that Apple doesn't have a social media platform that is "pushing stuff in your feed," but notes it does have the App Store which it takes careful consideration in curating content for.

Well, you know, I can only speak for Apple. And from the very start, we've always believed in curation. And so we review every app that goes on the store. That doesn't mean that we're perfect at doing it. We're not. But we care deeply about what we're offering our users. And when we have a new product like Apple News, we have human editors that are selecting the key stories. And so they're avoiding all of the misinformation that is out there. The reality is that the web in some areas has become a dark place. And without curation, you wind up with this firehose of things that I would not want to put into an amplifier. Which is what tech is in a large way. If you have a platform, you amplify things.
Cook in typical Apple fashion never comments on future, unreleased Apple products. However, possibly hinting at Apple Glasses, Cook says AR is "critically" important for the future of Apple. The CEO envisions a future where conversations include more than just words, but include charts, and "other things" appearing in a virtual space.
Well, I can't talk about anything that we may or may not have in the pipeline. But in terms of AR, the promise of AR is that you and I are having a great conversation right now. Arguably, it could even be better if we were able to augment our discussion with charts or other things to appear. Your audience would also benefit from this, too, I think. And so when I think about that in different fields, whether it's health, whether it's education, whether it's gaming, whether it's retail, I'm already seeing AR take off in some of these areas. And I think the promise is even greater in the future. So it's a critically important part of Apple's future.
Speaking about Apple's fight with Epic Games, Cook says that Epic had long followed App Store rules, but decided to no longer follow the guidelines all other developers follow. Cook says Apple is "confident" in its case with the gaming giant.
It's about living up to the rules and the guidelines of the App Store, and they had done that for years and then had decided, evidently, that they didn't want to follow the rules anymore and had passed something throughout the review process, and then after it had been through app review, changed it on the server-side. So it was sort of a deceitful move. And so we're going into court. We're coming to tell our story. We're going to talk about the privacy and security aspects of the store. And we're confident in our case.

One of Epic Games' biggest arguments about the Apple ecosystem is the lack of so-called "freedom" for users to download apps from places other than the App Store. Many have long voiced their hope that Apple would allow users to sideload apps onto their device, such as the iPhone. Cook says that sideloading apps, however, would "break the privacy and security" model of the iPhone.

In the remainder of the podcast, Tim Cook talks about his relationship with the President Biden administration and said he "probably" will not be Apple's CEO in 10 years. The full 36-minute long podcast is available over at The New York Times.

Article Link: Sideloading Apps Would 'Break' the Security and Privacy of iPhone, Says Tim Cook
 
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Populus

macrumors 68000
Aug 24, 2012
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Valencia, Spain.
I would update straight to 14.5, because I like this privacy focused features; however, many people is complaining about Bluetooth issues (apparently those issues are already happening on 14.4.2) and connectivity issues when switching from WiFi to LTE/5G and viceversa. So, I guess the safest is not update until all this issues are solved, maybe by 14.5.1 or even 14.6?
 
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jafd

macrumors member
Oct 14, 2010
70
157
Dear Tim,

Sideloading apps would primarily break App Store revenues and its de facto monopoly, you know it, we know that you know, and you know that we know that you know it.

The fact that Bitcoin scams pass through the App Store review like air passes through a sieve, speaks volumes about the quality and security of your infrastructure.

Now pull the other one, it's got bells on.
 
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Jony Ive and Co.

macrumors regular
Jul 9, 2020
221
327
said he "probably" will not be Apple's CEO in 10 years
TO ME, THIS IS THE BIGGEST NEWS EVER (the rest of the interview/article is mostly just regurgitating already known stuff). Wow, Tim talks about how long he will remain as CEO. I wonder who will be next in line (I know, probably Jeff Williams). Nevertheless it will be so interesting to see where Apple will head and how this CEO transition will play out. Really really surprising and amazing stuff.

This also puts into question how Tim's current AR plans and the grand scheme of things will proceed once he is out. Time will fly, and he will only be here for a few more generations/years of iPhone. I really wonder what the next big thing is going to be. There are so many exciting projects (AR glasses, Apple Silicon transition continues, Apple Car etc) on the horizon
 
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Phil A.

Moderator
Staff member
Apr 2, 2006
5,657
2,733
Shropshire, UK
As long as Apple isn’t held legally liable why should they care?
Because people would do something stupid, get themselves in a mess and then be all over social media blaming Apple, which would potentially damage their image (which they are fiercely protective of)

Apple have always taken a “we know best” approach with iOS whereas Google have been more pragmatic with Android.

I can see arguments for both approaches but I do believe Apple should be able to apply the rules they want on the platform they developed: if a user wants more freedom and control, there are plenty of other phones on the market
 
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Naraxus

macrumors 65816
Oct 13, 2016
1,188
5,552
TO ME, THIS IS THE BIGGEST NEWS EVER (the rest of the interview/article is mostly just regurgitating already known stuff). Wow, Tim talks about how long he will remain as CEO. I wonder who will be next in line (I know, probably Jeff Williams). Nevertheless it will be so interesting to see where Apple will head and how this CEO transition will play out. Really really surprising and amazing stuff.

This also puts into question how Tim's current AR plans and the grand scheme of things will proceed once he is out. Time will fly, and he will only be here for a few more generations/years of iPhone. I really wonder what the next big thing is going to be. There are so many exciting projects (AR glasses, Apple Silicon transition continues, Apple Car etc) on the horizon
He should never have been made CEO to begin with
 
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falkon-engine

macrumors regular
Apr 30, 2010
156
397
Couldn’t Apple develop and release an API (for other App Stores) for loading apps onto the phone?

Sideloading, as he claims, would break the security model, but there has to be some way for Apps to be loaded onto the phone, as evidenced by the App Store.
 
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Gherkin

macrumors 6502a
Apr 9, 2004
532
183
ATT sounds great. Anytime FB is upset you know you are doing something beneficial for your users. The fact that these apps could track us across websites and other apps like this is just scummy and should never have been allowed in the first place.
 
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Dom_

macrumors member
Apr 18, 2020
35
54
Cook says that sideloading apps, however, would "break the privacy and security" model of the iPhone.
So the privacy and security of macOS is broken then?

In my experience it isn't. Do it like on the mac. Make the App Store the default way of installing apps, block others by default. Only if people know what they do and enable it digged down deep in the settings allow it. This protects the security and allows for more freedom (and it actually would be like on the mac).
I see no problem the way it is now - until Apple acts in a way that is problematic. What if they disagree with you on a core value and therefore prohibit you from installing an app that you find perfectly acceptable and would like to use.

The other thing of course is allowing other methods of payment. There is no reason to prohibit those out of "privacy and security reasons". You could even make a program so that only certified payment providers (that take care of privacy etc.) are allowed. I see no problem there. And the whole "the App Store costs so much money" thing doesn't make sense to me. Nearly any other digital store hosts free apps for free. It is worth it for the companies that run them because when people get the free ones there, they're much more likely to use them for the payed ones, too...
 
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Kris Kelvin

macrumors regular
Dec 28, 2005
223
161
As a developer, I hate that I'm forced to use App Store distribution (and some enterprise stuff, but that only works for select use cases) and that I'm therefore limited to Apple-approved ways of doing things (so no low-level tinkery).

As a user, I love that all available apps can be found in the App Store and that I don't have to worry about unsigned stuff running on my iPhone. Sure, App Store reviews aren't perfect, but they're clearly better than nothing.

I can't see any way to make both sides perfectly happy, and if I'd have to choose, I'd prefer to keep things as they are, except for two things:
  • Standardized commission of 10%
  • No "objectionable content" rejections; if an app is legal in a region, it should be allowed to be distributed (this includes information about drone strike casualties, adult stuff etc.). Showing a warning is fine, as is blocking access for minors.
 
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utterer

macrumors newbie
Jan 14, 2016
19
98
Epic is fighting this lawsuit for one of their majority stakeholders - Tencent. Tencent wants an App Store on your devices. I don’t want them polluting what has worked fine all these years.

Developer payment rates and Apple’s cut taken from them I do agree need some adjustment but keep the mobile garden walled. Security is a major concern here.

Remember most of the accounts here posting in favor for side loading are paid shills for Coalition for App Fairness.
 
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sirdir

macrumors regular
Aug 16, 2006
239
415
As a developer, I hate that I'm forced to use App Store distribution (and some enterprise stuff, but that only works for select use cases) and that I'm therefore limited to Apple-approved ways of doing things (so no low-level tinkery).

As a user, I love that all available apps can be found in the App Store and that I don't have to worry about unsigned stuff running on my iPhone. Sure, App Store reviews aren't perfect, but they're clearly better than nothing.

I can't see any way to make both sides perfectly happy, and if I'd have to choose, I'd prefer to keep things as they are, except for two things:
  • Standardized commission of 10%
  • No "objectionable content" rejections; if an app is legal in a region, it should be allowed to be distributed (this includes information about drone strike casualties, adult stuff etc.)
As a user, you love it, as long as you're not looking for an app that wouldn't be allowed on the app store…
 
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webdesignbyian

Cancelled
Nov 12, 2020
14
50
I can see arguments for both approaches but I do believe Apple should be able to apply the rules they want on the platform they developed: if a user wants more freedom and control, there are plenty of other phones on the market
This 100%. I choose Apple because it's easy to use, pretty damn secure and the products are in the main excellent and allow me to get on with my day to day tasks.

iOS is Apples product. If users want to use an alternative that does what they want, then they are free to buy hardware that allows them to do just that.

If Apple opened up iOS to things such as side loading, the result is too predictable. People would be trashing their phones left, right and centre without any accountability. Who would get the blame? Apple and iOS.
 
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