Speed up startup time...

Discussion in 'macOS' started by Sdahe, Sep 19, 2008.

  1. Sdahe macrumors 68000

    Sdahe

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2007
    Location:
    San Juan, PR
    #1
    Hello guys...

    Is there a way to speed up startup time in a MacBook Pro... ?

    Thanks
     
  2. Sorkvild macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2007
  3. Sdahe thread starter macrumors 68000

    Sdahe

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2007
    Location:
    San Juan, PR
    #3
    Haven't measure it yet... How long would be ok?
     
  4. EV0LUTION macrumors 6502

    EV0LUTION

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2008
    Location:
    Florida
    #4
    it's normally 15s - 45s depending on your ram if I remember correctly
     
  5. pyr0sphere macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2007
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    #5
    Sincerely doubt it's possible to achieve 15s especially if you're using Leopard

    Anyway, using 10.5.5 on my Macbook, I usually boot up in about 45s - 1min
     
  6. plinden macrumors 68040

    plinden

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2004
    #6
    Do you boot to the login screen (ie. have auto login off) or do you boot straight to your desktop?

    If the second, you should take a look at your account's Login Items (Preferences/Accounts). See if there's anything there you can remove.
     
  7. gusious macrumors 65816

    gusious

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2007
    Location:
    Greece
    #7
    Oh man come on! I don't think it takes too much time!! It's not Windows!!

    As said before, check your login items.

    If you really hate waiting 1 minute then don't turn off your laptop. Put it to sleep. Lots of people do that(not me,i care for the environment!).
     
  8. Habusho macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2006
    #8
    Adding a firewall, like little snitch and some other programs definitely add a little bit to the startup time. Just check which items are auto starting with OsX and see. If there is nothing there, then it's about as fast as your machine can startup. I have a MySql server starting up, Little Snitch etc. and I would say it takes about 30sec on a new MBP.
     
  9. JG271 macrumors 6502a

    JG271

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2007
    Location:
    UK
    #9
    Also, if you have a lot of files or folders on your desktop it takes longer to start up too.
     
  10. Sdahe thread starter macrumors 68000

    Sdahe

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2007
    Location:
    San Juan, PR
    #10
    I checked the login items and erase the itune helper... I don't see how that helps me anyway!!!
     
  11. Ice-Cube macrumors 6502a

    Ice-Cube

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2006
    Location:
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    #11
    Use onyx to do some maintenance like clearing font cache, blah blah. Worked for me.
     
  12. gusious macrumors 65816

    gusious

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2007
    Location:
    Greece
    #12
    Or iceclean!:)
     
  13. richard.mac macrumors 603

    richard.mac

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Location:
    51.50024, -0.12662
    #13
    seriously do this. written by me and based on information gathered on the internets.

    1. Boot into secondary system
    2. Remove all caches from
    ~/Library/Caches
    /Library/Caches
    /System/Library/Caches
    /private/var/folders/fg/fgP3NCUOFimx9A+Njvxp5E+++TI/-Caches-/ (directory may differ and does not apply to Tiger and below)​
    3. Remove sleep image and swap file/s
    /private/var/vm
    4. Repair Permissions and Disk
    5. Boot into secondary system
    6. iDefrag Full Defrag (defrags system without caches)
    7. Boot into main system
    8. Force pre-binding (only do this after removing application caches)
    Code:
    sudo update_prebinding -root / -force
    9. Cache all applications (open everything)
    10. Reboot main system until OS is cached (4 times or so until stop seeing boot time improvements)
    11. Boot into secondary system
    12. Repair Permissions and Disk
    13. iDefrag Optimize (defrags caches and vm)
    14. Boot system again

    if you dont have iDefrag just ignore those steps and if you dont have a secondary system use Terminal on the install disc. if you dont feel comforatble in Terminal or know how to remove files using Unix use a maintenance application to remove caches (probably easier).

    my boot time in Leopard diminished by 20 seconds by doing this and application and data access time were shortened.
     
  14. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #14
    Re the above.

    If you find that the full defrags are taking too long you may find that cloning with CCC or SuperDuper! to an external drive, formatting the internal and cloning back is quicker. This should have pretty much the same effect as a defrag as the clone back will write the files onto a blank disk so no fragmentation.

    It is work saying that, in general, HFS+ disks shouldn't need defragging.
     
  15. kolax macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2007
    #15
    I never shut down my Mac, only when an update requires it or a big crash.

    I just let it sleep, it is very efficient and wakes from sleep instantly.
     
  16. EV0LUTION macrumors 6502

    EV0LUTION

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2008
    Location:
    Florida
    #16
    i got 15s on my first boot its been slipping since though
     
  17. richard.mac macrumors 603

    richard.mac

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Location:
    51.50024, -0.12662
    #17
    ^ thats because your loading data, applications and login items to your Mac. its not a fresh, naked, optimised OS install.
     
  18. macrem macrumors 65816

    macrem

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2008
    #18
    I'm at ~17 seconds up to the login screen on a MBP 2.4 GHz IC2D w/ 4GB RAM. Have not yet tried optimizations described above.

    This MBP had Tiger pre-installed, then I upgraded to Leopard from the day of release and have been upgrading incrementally to 10.5.5 and have (un)installed countless apps in between...

    I don't have any major complaints. The machines feels fast, but if I'm ever home on a rainy day, I might do a fresh install of Leopard, then go straight to the latest software. Has anyone done this and noticed a (significant) difference?

    I would then retrieve my files and settings from a Time Machine backup; however, doing a full restore from Time Machine seems like it could bring back some of the artifacts that I would be trying to eliminate.

    The only noticeable quirk that comes to mind is in my user account. Sometimes after login the menu bar has no background for a few seconds or until I launch a Finder window or an app (anything that makes it refresh).
     
  19. RichardF macrumors 6502a

    RichardF

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    #19

    Could you please tell us how to do this?
     
  20. richard.mac macrumors 603

    richard.mac

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Location:
    51.50024, -0.12662
    #20
    clone your Mac onto an external hard drive using Carbon Copy Cloner and then boot into it by holding option on startup. or if you dont have an external drive you can make a boot CD with iDefrag which you can boot into the same way.
     
  21. RichardF macrumors 6502a

    RichardF

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    #21
    OK, thank you.

    So 2), 3) and 4) should be performed in main system while booted in the secondary system, correct?
     
  22. macrem macrumors 65816

    macrem

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2008
    #22
    It looks to me like:

    1. Boot into secondary system
    2. Remove all caches from

    ^ could also be done from primary system with "rm -f", then reboot, or put cache files in the trash and force empty or empty after rebooting.

    11. Boot into secondary system
    12. Repair Permissions and Disk

    ^ could also be done by booting the OS X Install CD, then run Disk Utility from the CD

    I never used iDefrag, aside from that it looks possible to perform other steps without a secondary system.

    While at it, I would also boot into single-user mode to run fsck.

    Same here, but I do not recall having a single system crash on Leopard.
     
  23. gnasher729 macrumors P6

    gnasher729

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    #23
    I rarely ever shut my MacBook down. Just close the lid, it goes to sleep, you open the lid, it wakes up, and done.
     
  24. RichardF macrumors 6502a

    RichardF

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    #24

    OK.

    However, I thought that booting from the restore CD and running Repair Permission on the Macintosh HD from Disk Utility there wasn't recommended because it will implement "out-dated" permissions.
    I remember reading this long ago. Is there any truth to it?
     
  25. macrem macrumors 65816

    macrem

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2008
    #25
    Good point. Disk Utility's permissions db on the original Leopard CD, for ex., is definitely outdated. I'm not sure if/how it handles updates.
     

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