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Apr 12, 2001
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T-Mobile today hosted an Un-carrier event where the company announced the launch of a a new 5G home internet plan, which is priced at $60 per month and offers unlimited data.


The service is available to more than 30 million Americans across much of the United States, including 10 million households in rural areas not typically able to access reliable broadband. Connectivity will be either 4G or 5G, depending on what's available in a given area.

T-Mobile is promising average speeds of 100Mb/s for "most" new customers, and the company is providing a 4G/5G modem that can be set up in minutes by plugging it in and downloading an app. The service is priced at $60 per month with AutoPay, and T-Mobile says there are no added taxes or fees, no contracts, and no equipment fees, plus data is unlimited. Potential customers can visit T-Mobile's website to see if they're eligible.

tmobile-5g-modem.jpg

To further its availability in rural areas, T-Mobile is launching the "Hometown" initiative to bring 5G to rural America. This plan will include hiring 7,500 employees in small towns and rural communities and providing $25 million in grants for community development projects.

In areas where T-Mobile is unable to open new stores, the company will have "Hometown Experts" that are the official T-Mobile representative in a community. T-Mobile is hiring 2,500 Hometown Experts for small towns.

T-Mobile today also announced a trade-in program for a free iPhone 12 with the trade-in of an iPhone 11, half off an iPhone 12 with the trade-in of older iPhone models ranging from iPhone 7 to iPhone X, and half off the iPhone 12 mini with the trade-in of any older iPhone. Trade-in compensation is provided through 24 monthly bill credits to ensure customers stick with T-Mobile.

For existing customers, T-Mobile is upgrading all T-Mobile and Sprint customers to unlimited plans for free. Customers who have AT&T or Verizon with fixed data plans can also trade-in older smartphones for a free Samsung Galaxy A32 5G.

Article Link: T-Mobile Launches Unlimited 5G Home Internet for $60/Month
 
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axboi87

macrumors regular
Aug 31, 2006
194
132
Dallas, Tx
I got it as a backup line in case ATT Fiber ever goes down (and it's month to month, so I may just cancel at some point...really just wanted to try it). I'm in central Dallas (TX) and get around 300mb/s symmetrical through it, with <30ms latency (have seen that spike to 50ms on like...friday afternoons). The little router is pretty good (I believe it's Wifi 6), it has an analog phone port for phone service (not offered yet), and the app has a current disabled option to add mesh units they may offer later on for large houses. Could easily be someones main internet and routing equipment where fiber is not available, since the upload speeds are far better than spectrum and the latency is similar to cable.
 
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ipedro

macrumors 603
Nov 30, 2004
5,471
6,634
Toronto, ON
This is where I've been saying the industry is headed and is exactly why Apple discontinued their AirPort.

As 5G infrastructure spreads, eventually every device that needs connectivity will have it built in. Everything from a laptop to a smart watch to a connected lightbulb to a smart dog collar will have a 5G chip that accesses your 5G plan and is always online.

The days of WiFi networking will give way to always connected devices networking via the cloud, not a local router.
 
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nutmac

macrumors 603
Mar 30, 2004
5,014
4,108
This is where I've been saying the industry is headed and is exactly why Apple discontinued their AirPort.

As 5G infrastructure spreads, eventually every device that needs connectivity will have it built in. Everything from a laptop to a smart watch to a connected lightbulb to a smart dog collar will have a 5G chip that accesses your 5G plan and is always online.

The days of WiFi networking will give way to always connected devices networking via the cloud, not a local router.
But that means every single devices will need to have a cellular plan. For stationary devices like lightbulbs and printers, cellular connectivity is just an overkill. These devices should share a single Internet service.

But for mobile devices like phones and computers, Wi-Fi might someday become optional.
 
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Scoob Redux

macrumors member
Sep 25, 2020
84
171
The service is priced at $60 per month with AutoPay, ...

Always avoid Autopay when possible. Once you let a corporation into your bank account, it's difficult to get them out. They can take your money (i.e. after service cancellation or in the event of disputes) and the burden is on you to try and get it back. When you pay through traditional invoice/payment, YOU are always in control - if there is a dispute, you don't pay and they have to try and get it.
 
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ThirteenXIII

macrumors 6502a
Mar 8, 2008
743
70
But that means every single devices will need to have a cellular plan. For stationary devices like lightbulbs and printers, cellular connectivity is just an overkill. These devices should share a single Internet service.

But for mobile devices like phones and computers, Wi-Fi might someday become optional.

How do you figure? They provide a modem and local devices will connect to that. Same way I can hotspot any wi-fi device to my iPhone and only need the single cellular connection...
 
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Cayden

macrumors 6502a
Jul 10, 2014
828
416
Utah
This sounds great, unfortunately not in my area yet. We currently pay $50 for 1.2 TB of data (we often go over) at 25 Mbps on contract, so basically everything is better and well worth the $10 increase. It started at $35 and then goes up about $15 a year. We only have two providers in our area, so they both just keep the prices quite high since there are no other options
 
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ipedro

macrumors 603
Nov 30, 2004
5,471
6,634
Toronto, ON
But that means every single devices will need to have a cellular plan.

No it doesn't. That's not a technology problem, that's a business decision.

Prior to iPhones, data was geared towards WAP websites (remember that?). The iPhone landed and suddenly unlimited internet became a thing and every other provider had to keep up.

Remember when we had to pay 10 cents *per SMS*? How MMS cost more? At the rate people send texts these days, we'd spend easily a dollar a minute if not more, just having a casual conversation.

As more and more devices gain their own integrated connectivity, providers are going to compete for your business to get those devices online. Having a single plan that allows 10, 20, 50+ devices will become commonplace. 5G's bandwidth enables that — in fact, 5G was specifically designed for this kind of "Internet of Things" future.
 
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TriApple

Contributor
Mar 16, 2011
137
79
This is where I've been saying the industry is headed and is exactly why Apple discontinued their AirPort.

As 5G infrastructure spreads, eventually every device that needs connectivity will have it built in. Everything from a laptop to a smart watch to a connected lightbulb to a smart dog collar will have a 5G chip that accesses your 5G plan and is always online.

The days of WiFi networking will give way to always connected devices networking via the cloud, not a local router.
How does the industry intend to secure my light bulb if it is directly connecting to a 5g network?
 
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