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It was another surprise Apple product launch week, with Apple opening up sales of the new Magic Keyboard with built-in Touch ID on a standalone basis after its debut earlier this year as part of the new 24-inch iMac. Now, users of other M1 Macs can get their hands on the accessory for easy fingerprint authentication.


Apple this week also released some new high-end graphics options for the Mac Pro, while the company brought back a dedicated "Store" section on its website. We also saw evidence of upcoming MacBook Pro and Apple Watch updates and got a preview of several upcoming child safety features that will be coming in updates to iOS, iPadOS, and macOS later this year, so check out our video above and read on below for details on these stories and more!

Apple Makes Magic Keyboard With Touch ID Available for Separate Purchase

In late April, Apple introduced a new Magic Keyboard with a built-in Touch ID sensor for unlocking a Mac with a fingerprint. The keyboard was only available with the redesigned 24-inch iMac, but as of this week, the keyboard can be purchased separately for use with any Mac with an M1 chip, including the MacBook Air, 13-inch MacBook Pro, and Mac mini.

Magic-Keyboard-Touch-ID-Feature.jpg

Apple has also started shipping the Magic Mouse and Magic Trackpad with braided USB-C to Lightning cables in the box, and the Magic Keyboard with Touch ID is available in an extended Numeric Keypad layout.

Apple Reveals New Child Safety Features, Including Scanning Photos for Known Sexual Abuse Material

Apple this week previewed new child safety features that will be coming to the iPhone, iPad, and Mac with software updates later this year.

iphone-communication-safety-feature.jpg

The upcoming features include a Communication Safety tool in the Messages app that warns children and their parents when receiving or sending sexually explicit photos, the ability for Apple to detect known Child Sexual Abuse Material (CSAM) images stored in iCloud Photos, and improved CSAM guidance from Siri/Spotlight Search.

Apple Adds New High-End Graphics Options for Mac Pro

This week saw Apple release new high-end AMD Radeon Pro W6000 series graphics modules for the 2019 Mac Pro. The new graphics options are available when configuring a new Mac Pro on Apple's online store, and the modules are also being sold on a standalone basis for installation in an existing Mac Pro.

radeon-pro-w6000-series-mpx-modules.jpg

Apple has shared support documents walking through the many different display setups that can be used with the GPUs and how to use AMD's Infinity Fabric Link technology for increased performance and faster data transfer between the modules.

Unreleased Apple Watches and Macs Listed in Regulatory Database

The fall season is just around the corner and, as usual, that means we can expect several new Apple products to launch in the coming months.

Apple-Watch-7-Unreleased-Feature-Red.jpg

In advance, Apple has filed a lengthy list of unreleased Mac and Apple Watch models in the Eurasian Economic Commission's regulatory database. These listings will likely end up being the Apple Watch Series 7 models and new Apple silicon 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pro models.

Wi-Fi 6E Explained: What It Could Mean for iPhone 13 and Beyond

iPhone 13 models are widely rumored to feature Wi-Fi 6E, and to better understand what this means, MacRumors sat down for an exclusive interview with Kevin Robinson, senior vice president of marketing for the Wi-Fi Alliance.

iPhone-13-Wi-Fi-6E-feature-update.jpg

At a surface level, Wi-Fi 6E offers the features and capabilities of Wi-Fi 6, including higher performance, lower latency, and faster data rates, extended into the 6 GHz band. However, there are a lot more nuances, so the interview is a worthwhile read ahead of the release of iPhone 13 models.

Working AirPower Prototype Shown in Video Clip

A video of a seemingly functional AirPower prototype has been shared on Twitter by Apple device collector Giulio Zompetti, in what appears to be a first-of-its-kind look at the elusive charger in action.

airpower-prototype-video.jpg

The video shows a unique on-screen iOS animation when the iPhone is placed on the ‌AirPower‌ charging mat, which has only previously been seen in Apple's early marketing materials, making it the first time this animation has been seen in the wild. An ‌iPhone‌ on the ‌AirPower‌ charger would have shown the charge of all of the devices that were placed on the pad.

Apple's Website Reintroduces Dedicated 'Store' Tab

What's old is new again! Apple this week reintroduced a dedicated online "Store" section on its website, allowing customers to browse products in a centralized place. Apple had removed the section in 2015, but a pandemic-driven surge in online shopping likely prompted the company to reverse its decision.

apple-store-website.jpg

The page looks very similar to the Apple Store app on mobile devices and also contains information about refurbished products, trade-ins, and other helpful shopping resources.

MacRumors Newsletter

Each week, we publish an email newsletter like this highlighting the top Apple stories, making it a great way to get a bite-sized recap of the week hitting all of the major topics we've covered and tying together related stories for a big-picture view.

So if you want to have top stories like the above recap delivered to your email inbox each week, subscribe to our newsletter!

Article Link: Top Stories: Magic Keyboard With Touch ID, New MacBook Pro and Apple Watches Incoming, and More
 
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bumpylumpy

macrumors regular
Mar 13, 2015
117
183
By far, the TOP story of this week is Apple's decision to automatically scan photos on your iPhone for illegal content. That should be the story up top; by comparison, all of the rest of these stories feel really insignificant.
 

makitango

macrumors regular
Apr 15, 2012
244
438
By far, the TOP story of this week is Apple's decision to automatically scan photos on your iPhone for illegal content. That should be the story up top; by comparison, all of the rest of these stories feel really insignificant.
Agreed. This week marks the death of the privacy brand. But at least they are honest about it.
However I wonder if they are not honest with other things.
 

bumpylumpy

macrumors regular
Mar 13, 2015
117
183
Agreed. This week marks the death of the privacy brand. But at least they are honest about it.
However I wonder if they are not honest with other things.

Well, given that this feature has been in development for many years (according to the memo the posted the night the news broke), and it was not even mentioned ONCE at WWDC where they rundown all of the features of iOS 15, they definitely were trying to keep this one quiet.
 

cyanite

macrumors regular
Sep 28, 2015
100
56
Agreed. This week marks the death of the privacy brand. But at least they are honest about it.
However I wonder if they are not honest with other things.
Now, I think that’s a big exaggeration. But it’s fine to disagree about that, as long as we’re clear on what’s facts and what’s speculation. As for trust, if you don’t trust Apple to be honest, I suggest you stop using their devices and services.

Well, given that this feature has been in development for many years (according to the memo the posted the night the news broke), and it was not even mentioned ONCE at WWDC where they rundown all of the features of iOS 15, they definitely were trying to keep this one quiet.
So quiet, in fact, that they publicly announced it and have clarified and responded later on. If they wanted to do something in secret, they could just not announce it and do it server side. Again, if you don’t trust a company I wouldn’t use their products.
 

bumpylumpy

macrumors regular
Mar 13, 2015
117
183
I think ultimately this will be seen as the beginning of the end of Apple. Not because of this one feature really, but because of just how badly this was handled. We could blame it on the fact that since everyone is working from home and that teams that would have normally bumped into each other in the hall might have discovered this was a bad idea and put stop to it, or it could just be that there are now so many voices at Apple that things are increasingly designed by committee and bureacratic, and like all large unwieldy organizations, it becomes very hard to keep focused and have a coherent mission.

I suspect we will find out that there are opposing forces inside Apple; many who feel the same way and are outraged at what has happened, along with others who feel this is their life's work and are very hurt that nobody wants to protect the children as much as they do.

I've seen this happen in many large companies and it usually is a sign that things are out of control and we're just seeing the tip of the iceberg.

Thankfully we have been given a warning with ample time - we now have over a year with iOS 14 which can give many of us time to plan our exit if we choose. I, for one will be delaying my fall phone purchase to investigate what other options I have, including continuing to use my iPhone but only for the absolute minimum features only it can provide.

This will give me the motivation I need to re-examine the tech I use and it's actually exciting to know that other people feel the same way, and perhaps this will spur some new companies and innovation in the open source space that would not have occurred otherwise.

Sometimes the best ideas and companies come about from the blunders of others; I suspect Linux would have never taken off so quickly had it not been for Microsoft's errors in the 1990s.
 

bumpylumpy

macrumors regular
Mar 13, 2015
117
183
If they wanted to do something in secret, they could just not announce it and do it server side. Again, if you don’t trust a company I wouldn’t use their products.

I suspect some people may do just that. But you have to admit, this is a major blunder on Apple's part, who have been notoriously good at keeping secrets and managing their public image.

Some of this public image is directed towards the general casual public, but a large part of that image is targeted towards security researchers and highly targeted individuals who follow the advice of their security teams. The Apple premium at this point has been "trust us; we've earned your trust; this is why we cost more $$."

Even if Google is "no better than Apple", then you have to ask, why am I paying this premium? Especially if Google is offering other, non-security related features at a better price point?

All this does is nullify Apple's main advantage, which is better security. Most everyone has caught up on device aesthetics and technology, and they are less expensive as well.
 

TheYayAreaLiving

macrumors demi-goddess
Jun 18, 2013
9,645
29,478
Las Vegas, Nevada
Dear MacRumors: Can we move this under the top #1 story, please?

Apple Reveals New Child Safety Features, Including Scanning Photos for Known Sexual Abuse Material

Apple dropped the bomb on us this week. It’s a joke. I really hope Apple reverses it’s decision.

Bottomline: Do not upgrade to iOS 15. Say good bye to privacy and your personal data.

1628352949363.jpeg
 
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grilledcheesesandwich

macrumors newbie
Jun 10, 2021
25
91
Even if Google is "no better than Apple", then you have to ask, why am I paying this premium? Especially if Google is offering other, non-security related features at a better price point?
If anything, Google now looks downright transparent versus Apple. The privacy & security improvements for Android 12 make iOS 15 look that much worse. I never imagined "Don't be evil" would apply more to Apple than Google.
 
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jigzaw

macrumors 6502
Oct 12, 2012
469
305
I think ultimately this will be seen as the beginning of the end of Apple. Not because of this one feature really, but because of just how badly this was handled. We could blame it on the fact that since everyone is working from home and that teams that would have normally bumped into each other in the hall might have discovered this was a bad idea and put stop to it, or it could just be that there are now so many voices at Apple that things are increasingly designed by committee and bureacratic, and like all large unwieldy organizations, it becomes very hard to keep focused and have a coherent mission.

I suspect we will find out that there are opposing forces inside Apple; many who feel the same way and are outraged at what has happened, along with others who feel this is their life's work and are very hurt that nobody wants to protect the children as much as they do.

I've seen this happen in many large companies and it usually is a sign that things are out of control and we're just seeing the tip of the iceberg.

Thankfully we have been given a warning with ample time - we now have over a year with iOS 14 which can give many of us time to plan our exit if we choose. I, for one will be delaying my fall phone purchase to investigate what other options I have, including continuing to use my iPhone but only for the absolute minimum features only it can provide.

This will give me the motivation I need to re-examine the tech I use and it's actually exciting to know that other people feel the same way, and perhaps this will spur some new companies and innovation in the open source space that would not have occurred otherwise.

Sometimes the best ideas and companies come about from the blunders of others; I suspect Linux would have never taken off so quickly had it not been for Microsoft's errors in the 1990s.
I doubt the company is going anywhere so I don't see it as the end, but it invites a lot of frightening questions.

1. Do Android and Samsung already do this without letting anyone know? Or do they do it openly and Apple is just catching up? I honestly don't know.

2. In the U.S. it's "for the children", but what about people in China and other dictatorships where Apple feels compelled to "comply with local law"? Will Apple be turning over the results of their phone scans to those governments? Will anyone in China with a Winnie the Pooh photo, or a meme about the Uighur genocide on their phone be flagged and reported to the Chinese government?

3. How about in places like Russia where homosexuality is virtually criminalized? Will Apple be reporting who is sexting their same-sex partner to the Russian authorities? You might laugh, but the minute Apple rolls this out you better believe these dictatorships will start requiring Apple to use this technology to "comply with local law" if they want to remain in the market.

4. If I took a topless photo of a woman I dated 5 years ago, and it's still on the cloud, and it gets flagged, who looks at it? And if she's wrongly judged to be underaged by whoever on Apple's staff does the looking at photos, what recourse do I have when my phone is suddenly locked and the FBI is breaking down my door? Even if the charges are eventually dropped once the ex comes forward to prove she was an adult when the photo was taken, at this point the suspect has almost certainly lost their job and been shunned by the people in their life.

5. Will Apple pay damages for lost wages, pain and suffering, and attorney fees when a false positive leads to law enforcement action? Will Apple's Terms of Service include a provision where you agree not to sue them if they wrongly get you locked up?

6. How are they judging message content? Are they reading and judging fantasy sexts between adults? Are they only looking at messages that go to Apple customers who are under 18? How can I be sure that if I called my adult girlfriend a "bad little girl" in a joke text message, that the FBI won't be reading it the next day and deciding whether it's actionable?

7. Regarding reexamining tech options - not a bad idea. I've been in the Apple ecosystem so long, even to the point of enthusiastically buying Apple stock when I started investing, that I have no idea what's goin on with Samsung or Pixel phones or how a Windows start page even looks these days. It's past time I caught up on the outside world. But again, are those companies just doing the same thing too?
 
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bumpylumpy

macrumors regular
Mar 13, 2015
117
183
If you haven’t read it, gruber has a good overview of the CSAM Apple stuff


The final paragraph pretty much sums up security researchers concerns about what Apple may do:

"Will Apple actually flatly refuse any and all such demands? If they do, it’s all good. If they don’t, and these features creep into surveillance for things like political dissent, copyright infringement, LGBT imagery, or adult pornography — anything at all beyond irrefutable CSAM — it’ll prove disastrous to Apple’s reputation for privacy protection."

Today, I believe Apple will refuse. But after Tim Cook retires in a few years?

EDIT: another poster already mentioned China, so yes, even Tim Cook will cave in.
 
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grilledcheesesandwich

macrumors newbie
Jun 10, 2021
25
91
If you haven’t read it, gruber has a good overview of the CSAM Apple stuff
It's really not good at all. Gruber entertains "Mr. Neuenschwander dismiss[ing] those concerns, saying that safeguards are in place to prevent abuse of the system and that Apple would reject any such demands from a government."

Exhibit A: China.

Hypocritical window dressing, in a nutshell. Google's exit from China just keeps looking better.
 
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bumpylumpy

macrumors regular
Mar 13, 2015
117
183
7. Regarding reexamining tech options - not a bad idea. I've been in the Apple ecosystem so long, even to the point of enthusiastically buying Apple stock when I started investing, that I have no idea what's goin on with Samsung or Pixel phones or how a Windows start page even looks these days. It's past time I caught up on the outside world. But again, are those companies just doing the same thing too?

I suspect these other companies are doing the same thing, but that ironically makes the decision making easier!

Prior to Apple's blunder, it was always easier to forgive Apple for its flaws because they always had the "we're more secure" advantage. Now they are simply on the same playing field as everyone else.

It just means we have to use things like Cryptomator to pre-encrypt all our materials that end up in the cloud. I have been lazy about doing that for everything, but if start doing that for my future phone needs it won't matter as much whether I choose Apple, Google or some future company.
 
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jigzaw

macrumors 6502
Oct 12, 2012
469
305
It's really not good at all. Gruber entertains "Mr. Neuenschwander dismiss[ing] those concerns, saying that safeguards are in place to prevent abuse of the system and that Apple would reject any such demands from a government."

Exhibit A: China.
Exactly. They're already collaborating with China, a government committing genocide RIGHT NOW, by censoring the internet for their customers there under the excuse of "complying with local law."

The minute Apple is rolling this out in the U.S. they'll be pushed by China and other dictatorships to do the same only for dissent, and to out gay people in places where homosexuality is a crime.

Apple might resist for a while, but when they're threatened with being evicted from that market how long until they start scanning phones for these other things with the excuse of "oh, we're just complying with local law."
 

bumpylumpy

macrumors regular
Mar 13, 2015
117
183
The biggest blunder IMO is Apple probably has lost a lot of infosec researchers with this move. Many people in the security research community use Apple products as their personal devices. Many of them will now move onto using other devices, and with it, there will be less of them focusing on testing Apple's security, which will in the end make Apple less secure overall.

Apple has been late to providing bug bounties, and is not very transparent or generous when accepting patches to their system; this move will likely make their relationship with security professionals worse, and will mean iOS as a whole will get less secure over time.
 

grilledcheesesandwich

macrumors newbie
Jun 10, 2021
25
91
Apple might resist for a while, but when they're threatened with being evicted from that market how long until they start scanning phones for these other things with the excuse of "oh, we're just complying with local law."
If Apple had Google's gumption, they would've given the finger to the CCP long ago. Just wait for the new iPhone to don the privacy mantle as if iOS 15 never happened. The hypocrisy just reeks.
 
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jigzaw

macrumors 6502
Oct 12, 2012
469
305
I suspect these other companies are doing the same thing, but that ironically makes the decision making easier!

Prior to Apple's blunder, it was always easier to forgive Apple for its flaws because they always had the "we're more secure" advantage. Now they are simply on the same playing field as everyone else.

It just means we have to use things like Cryptomator to pre-encrypt all our materials that end up in the cloud. I have been lazy about doing that for everything, but if start doing that for my future phone needs it won't matter as much whether I choose Apple, Google or some future company.
Not being very tech-savvy I doubt I'd even go that far. More likely I'll just change my lifestyle to turning off all cloud functions and treating my phone like an old-fashioned digital camera/mp3 player that I have to back up to a hard drive now and then. Maybe I'll even go back to ripping my own CD's instead of streaming! Haha. We gen-x'ers are experienced with pre-cloud living.

To your first point, that's true. If they're all doing it, and my whole reason for loving the Apple ecosystem was its security, then why shouldn't I consider that Galaxy or Pixel that costs less and has better hardware?
 

ElectricPotato

macrumors 6502a
Dec 13, 2018
559
1,460
Seattle
Thankfully we have been given a warning with ample time

Look on the bright side of life. :)

I admit to buying into Apple's advertised privacy orientation. In hindsight, it is silly to expect a network attached device too complex to be fully understood by the user and controlled remotely by a manufacturer subject to government whims would have any capacity for privacy.
 
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