Become a MacRumors Supporter for $25/year with no ads, private forums, and more!

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
52,007
13,630



When Apple announced macOS Catalina at the Worldwide Developers Conference and unveiled its new Catalyst feature that would allow iPad apps to be easily ported over to the Mac, Twitter was one of the upcoming apps shown off.

macOS Catalina launched on Monday, and as of today, the Twitter for Mac app is now available. macOS Catalina is required to download and use the new app, as it is built using Catalina technologies.

twitterformac-800x546.jpg

Twitter discontinued its prior Twitter for Mac client more than a year ago, which wasn't a popular decision with Twitter users. At the time, Twitter said that it was ending support for the app to focus on a Twitter experience consistent across platforms, and recommended Mac users use Twitter on the web.

Because Apple's Catalyst initiative makes it easier for apps designed for iOS to be brought to the Mac, Twitter has decided to reintroduce its Mac app, which shares similarities with the Twitter for iPad app.

Design wise, it's in line with the iPhone and iPad apps, but Twitter in June said that it has all of the features that users expect from a Mac app such as multiple windows, window resizing, drag and drop, dark mode, keyboard shortcuts, notifications, and more.

Twitter for Mac can be downloaded from the Mac App Store for free. [Direct Link]

Article Link: Twitter for Mac Now Available From Mac App Store
 

tekboi

macrumors 6502a
Aug 9, 2006
694
90
EasŦcoast
It's too bad the official twitter app is riddled with ads and doesn't do simple things, like... ya know... SHOW MY TIMELINE IN THE ORDER IN WHICH THINGS ARE TWEETED!

When they started restricting the API's to destroy the 3rd party apps slowly, it started going downhill.

R.I.P. the ORIGINAL TweetDeck app.
 
Comment

Craigwilliam

macrumors member
Jun 24, 2012
66
118
Auckland
I've just installed it, it has this weird quirk where it resizes (shrinks) when you click through notifications, messages, etc. But if you are just after a simple tweeting app for your mac it's the simple tweet design I used to know.
 
Comment

mactumors

macrumors 6502
Aug 3, 2008
306
27
After playing with it for 10 minutes, this is what I was afraid Catalyst apps would be like – a way for lazy developers to port over their iPad apps without having to design a desktop experience. I hope Mac apps don't become an afterthought for developers who feel like they just may as well support it.
 
Comment

kurtatx

macrumors demi-god
Oct 20, 2011
12,288
9,877
Austin, TX
The double tool bar looks a little weird.
[automerge]1570761484[/automerge]
After playing with it for 10 minutes, this is what I was afraid Catalyst apps would be like – a way for lazy developers to port over their iPad apps without having to design a desktop experience. I hope Mac apps don't become an afterthought for developers who feel like they just may as well support it.
It's probably better than not developing for Mac at all, however.
 
Comment

sdf

macrumors 6502
Jan 29, 2004
411
353
After playing with it for 10 minutes, this is what I was afraid Catalyst apps would be like – a way for lazy developers to port over their iPad apps without having to design a desktop experience. I hope Mac apps don't become an afterthought for developers who feel like they just may as well support it.

As bad as it is, at least it supports multiple windows and populates the menu bar. It could be even worse. And that is what I'm expecting most Catalyst apps to be.
 
  • Like
Reactions: martyjmclean
Comment

IG88

macrumors 6502a
Nov 4, 2016
806
1,061
Steve Jobs main reason for blocking Flash on iOS was due to it being a cross platform development tool, and thus "developers only have access to the lowest common denominator set of features."

No JVM for iOS / no writing in iOS apps in Java, same reason. Cross platform, lowest common denominator.

Hmm. Hmmmmm.
 
Last edited:
Comment

TrenttonY

macrumors 65816
Nov 14, 2012
1,021
896
After playing with it for 10 minutes, this is what I was afraid Catalyst apps would be like – a way for lazy developers to port over their iPad apps without having to design a desktop experience. I hope Mac apps don't become an afterthought for developers who feel like they just may as well support it.
*follows your idea*
*5 years later*

No Twitter. YouTube. Netflix. etc

When macOS has such a little market share compared to Windows, don't expect developers to care to develop standalone apps when they can just have those users use the website.

Better than nothing.
 
Comment

fmcshan

Editor
Apr 8, 2019
223
749
I’m about to download it to my Mac. I don’t really see a need for a Twitter mac app though since I can just log into twitter through Safari...
 
Comment

joeblough

macrumors 6502
Sep 30, 2006
427
267
why use this? i understand they messed up the API so 3rd party clients can't do much, but Twitteriffic works great... no twitter ads, and i assume, no analytics up the wazoo...
 
Comment

Seoras

macrumors 6502a
Oct 25, 2007
571
1,118
Scotsman in New Zealand
I've got a reasonably successful app (>600k installs & 4.8 rating) on the App Store which has a native iPad UI.
I've not updated to Catalina so my Xcode 11 has blanked out the Mac radio in the project build.
Therefore I'll admit upfront I've not tried the port using Catalyst yet.

What concerns me about Catalyst and running iPad apps on a Mac is - does the end user know they are downloading and using an App that was primarily built for iOS and iPad?
Folk can be pretty binary in their reviews. They are usually all 5 star or 1 star orientated.
It doesn't take much to set them off on one, lashing out in the reviews because of some tiny niggle.

So I suspect a lot of developers, keen to protect their ratings (are ratings ubiquitous across MacOS/iOS?), might be sitting this out and waiting and seeing how it pans out. It could be that the early adopters take the heat until the end users get wise to what to expect.
The App Store really should state that the App is an iPad app. I don't see that on the App store, or is that because I'm on MacOS 10.14?
 
Comment

joesegh

macrumors 6502
Jun 17, 2009
315
137
After playing with it for 10 minutes, this is what I was afraid Catalyst apps would be like – a way for lazy developers to port over their iPad apps without having to design a desktop experience. I hope Mac apps don't become an afterthought for developers who feel like they just may as well support it.
yup. opening twitter in a tab in your browser of choice is somehow more satisfying than the new macOS app.
 
  • Like
Reactions: seanrt
Comment

jsmith189

macrumors 68000
Jan 12, 2014
1,625
3,194
The app itself is... okay. I don't know what else I was expecting really lol, but there are just some strange design choices that may work for mobile but just feel a bit sloppy on Mac. Also, navigation is a bit buggy. It'll be interesting to see how it evolves.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Cleartz
Comment

MBX

macrumors 68000
Sep 14, 2006
1,864
464
It's 2019 and they still don't have an option to real-time stream tweets on mobile. As if I want to drag to refresh so often.

Does this macOS version have real-time streaming or do you need to pull down to refresh as well? If so that's really stupid then and can just stick to TweetDeck.
 
  • Like
Reactions: seanrt
Comment

coolfactor

macrumors 601
Jul 29, 2002
4,955
5,327
Vancouver, BC
What’s the benefit of using this vs the desktop web version that already works so well?

I absolutely hate having to "log into" apps. I just want to launch and use them. In Safari, as part of my website work, I use primarily private windows. There are a few exceptions, such as my banking and Mac forums sites. Twitter would never make that list.

I have three Twitter accounts (personal + 2 work). How does the web version handle that? Does it let you be signed into all three and then toggle between them like Tweetbot and the Twitter apps do? Maybe so. But I still prefer a real app over a web app.
 
Comment
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.