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United States President Joe Biden plans to direct the U.S. Federal Trade Commission to create new right to repair rules that would affect tech companies like Apple, reports Bloomberg.

apple-independent-repair-program.jpg

The rules would prevent manufacturers from limiting consumers' options for repairing products at independent repair shops or on their own, and the presidential directive is expected to mention mobile phone developers as an area for possible regulation. The FTC will be able to decide on the size and the scope of the order, so it is not yet clear how Apple might be impacted.

Multiple states have proposed right to repair legislation, which Apple has continually lobbied against. Apple claims that allowing independent repair shops to work on Apple devices without oversight would lead to security, safety, and quality issues. Many of the right to repair bills that have circulated call on tech companies to provide repair manuals and easy access to device components for repair purposes.

Apple does its own repairs in house at Apple retail stores and repair centers around the world, but it also works with Apple Authorized Service Providers to provide repair options. AASPs are managed by Apple and must meet Apple requirements, with some repairs and components limited.

When Right to Repair bills began surfacing, Apple also launched a worldwide Independent Repair Program that is designed to provide repair shops that are not AASPs with genuine parts, tools, repair manuals, and diagnostics for performing out-of-warranty repairs on Apple devices.

Repair shops have complained that Apple's program is too limited as it requires an Apple-certified technician to perform the repairs (available under a free program), and some parts are not provided to independent repair shops.

Biden's executive order is expected to be released in the coming days, and White House economic adviser Brian Deese on Friday said that it is meant to spur "greater competition in the economy" as well as lower prices for American families.

Back in November, the European Parliament also voted to develop new Right to Repair rules that will require companies to provide explicit information about the repairability and lifespan of products on consumer packaging. Under the terms of this order, manufacturers will need to provide a repair score, something that France has already enacted.

Article Link: U.S. President Joe Biden to Direct FTC to Draft Right to Repair Rules
 

moabal

macrumors 6502a
Jun 22, 2010
544
2,230
I am not a fan of Joe Biden. However, if this is what it sounds like, I would be happy (Louis Rossmann too I imagine). However, any final regulation/law would probably be mucked up a little if it gets that far.

Edit: LOL people disliking this because I am not a fan of Joe Biden. Do not read too much into this.
 
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Doctor Q

Administrator
Staff member
Sep 19, 2002
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Whether or not these bills become law, it's important for consumers to know if a repair company is run by Apple, is Apple-certified, is non-certified but uses only Apple parts, or is completly independent, and some way to verify this, so they can make informed choices.
 

subi257

macrumors 65816
Sep 13, 2018
1,176
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New Jersey
This should get interesting, talking way beyond Apple's products.
Whether or not these bills become law, it's important for consumers to know if a repair company is run by Apple, is Apple-certified, is non-certified but uses only Apple parts, or is completly independent, and some way to verify this, so they can make informed choices.
Yes, definitely
 

Analog Kid

macrumors 604
Mar 4, 2003
7,032
7,191
Repair shops have complained that Apple's program is too limited as it requires an Apple-certified technician to perform the repairs (available under a free program), and some parts are not provided to independent repair shops.
This is just silly. If you can’t bother to get certified in the repair you‘re doing, you don’t have the right to be in business.

I’d like the government to stay out of this, personally. If it’s just a question of who has access to parts, I’m less bothered, but if it forces design changes on Apple the we all suffer.
 

Analog Kid

macrumors 604
Mar 4, 2003
7,032
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I think that is why Apple now offers AppleCare before it expires or within 30 days after. That is indeed far better. :)
No, I think the point is that the company should be responsible for repairs for a longer time— selling these little insurance schemes is just another profit center for companies that discourages setting a baseline of quality.

In theory, that is. In practice I’ve never purchased Applecare and have never needed it.
 

sw1tcher

macrumors 68040
Jan 6, 2004
3,202
7,445
Multiple states have proposed right to repair legislation, which Apple has continually lobbied against. Apple claims that allowing independent repair shops to work on Apple devices without oversight would lead to security, safety, and quality issues.

Apple does its own repairs in house at Apple retail stores and repair centers around the world, but it also works with Apple Authorized Service Providers to provide repair options. AASPs are managed by Apple and must meet Apple requirements, with some repairs and components limited.
Damn those independent repair shops. Oh, wait...

Apple paid an unknown multimillion-dollar sum to a woman after iPhone repair technicians uploaded nude photos from her phone to Facebook. The Telegraph reported the 2016 payment based on court documents recently tied to Apple’s name, and Apple confirmed the incident in a statement to The Verge.

The case involves an unnamed Oregon college student known as Jane Doe, who sent her iPhone to a major Apple repair contractor called Pegatron Technology Service.
 

subi257

macrumors 65816
Sep 13, 2018
1,176
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New Jersey
I see this "righttorepair.org" and looking at the things they and followers are harping about should be interesting....not being negative here, but, There are limits to the possibility of reparability, parts, liability, insurance, PR reputation and cost affectivity for manufacturers. Also, it amazes me that in some of the tech areas that "tech people" don't get about "technology"

There are people complaining that the manufacturer no longer makes parts for a 15 year old car.....I mean really? There gets to a point where they just can't financially justify a production run of specific parts that may only sell 10. Or why does the radio from a 2008 car not fit into a 2019 of the same model.
 

ArtOfWarfare

macrumors G3
Nov 26, 2007
9,386
5,668
This is just silly. If you can’t bother to get certified in the repair you‘re doing, you don’t have the right to be in business.

I’d like the government to stay out of this, personally. If it’s just a question of who has access to parts, I’m less bothered, but if it forces design changes on Apple the we all suffer.
Disagree 100%. You should be able to start your small repair shop today. The government should be focused on making it as easy as possible to start up a new business.

You want deregulation? The government is making it happen, removing all of Apple's regulations.

Really, this is simple monopoly busting. Apple is free to compete with their repair shops. If you think Apple's repairs are worth the higher price, by all means go with them. If you think Apple's certifications mean something, go ahead and use an Apple certified independent repair shop. But personally, I like the 16 year old in high school who will fix my phone for $30. Kid is learning how to operate a business and gaining skills for a trade - it's far more valuable than anything else they'll get in high school, and I applaud efforts to make it easier.
 

IIGS User

macrumors 6502a
Feb 24, 2019
790
2,082
I dunno, call me cynical, but there's just too much money in the pot for the big boys. Apple clearly opposes it. Products that are easily repaired can have their life extended, and this leads to lower sales of new equipment.

It would seem we're reaching the point where a sort of planed obsolescence via software is becoming harder and harder to justify. iOS 15 is backwards compatible to iPhone 6S. Which on one hand, I give Apple credit for, on the other hand, how can they justify it not? It's really difficult to find some killer feature in the software that won't run on one of these older phones.

That's a 7 year to release look back on the device to have it run the most current software. So even if you run 15 on a 6S and get another 2 years out of it, that's almost a decade.

Apple can only sell so many phones at that pace. Unless they restrict how and where they allow repairs. It's also a recurring revenue stream, much like subscription services.


I typically buy a new iPhone every 2 years because that's how I "treat myself" as I don't travel much, and have no children to eat away at my bank account. But most people in general don't upgrade that often. Many of my co workers are still using iPhone 7's and are fine with it.

I can't even see a justification for upgrading my Apple Watch series 4 right now. The battery life is at 92% and it does all the things I really want it to (Apple Pay being the most useful for me, making it so I almost never leave the house without my watch). Even the rumors in the features of the 7 don't tease me enough to put out the money.
 

jk73

macrumors 65816
Jul 19, 2012
1,187
1,158
Disagree 100%. You should be able to start your small repair shop today. The government should be focused on making it as easy as possible to start up a new business.

You want deregulation? The government is making it happen, removing all of Apple's regulations.

Really, this is simple monopoly busting. Apple is free to compete with their repair shops. If you think Apple's repairs are worth the higher price, by all means go with them. If you think Apple's certifications mean something, go ahead and use an Apple certified independent repair shop. But personally, I like the 16 year old in high school who will fix my phone for $30. Kid is learning how to operate a business and gaining skills for a trade - it's far more valuable than anything else they'll get in high school, and I applaud efforts to make it easier.

The only thing worse than regulation is the lack of regulation.
 
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