UK Parliamentary Bill Would Require Backdoors in Electronic Devices

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by MacRumors, Mar 14, 2016.

  1. MacRumors macrumors bot

    MacRumors

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    Technology firms operating in the UK will be forced to install backdoors in their products and services for state surveillance purposes under proposed new laws, reports The Sunday Times.

    The new powers come under the controversial Investigatory Powers Bill (IPB), referred to by critics as the "Snooper's Charter", which was published by Home Secretary Theresa May on March 1 and is due to get its second reading in parliament tomorrow. The bill is backed by a draft code of practice that would also ban companies from revealing if they had been asked to install the backdoor technology.

    The accompanying draft document states that the British Home Secretary has the power to force firms to provide the "technical capability" to allow the security services to access communication data as well as undertake "interception" and "equipment interference".

    The bill itself grants the Home Secretary the power to order the removal of "electronic protection", which technology experts say is another word for encryption. Internet service providers would also have to keep records of the online browsing history of everyone for a period of 12 months and enable intelligence agencies to access the data unhindered, allowing them to see every website a person has visited.

    The UK opposition Labour party has warned the British government that it will derail the bill by abstaining to vote it through in its current form, which critics have called an invasion of privacy on a massive scale and a huge security risk if passed.

    "The Home Secretary's Bill requires substantial changes before it will be acceptable to us," said Shadow Home Secretary Andy Burnham. "It must start with a presumption of privacy, as recommended by the Intelligence and Security Committee, include a clearer definition of the information that can be held in an internet connection record and set a higher threshold to justify access to them."

    According to a 2016 Consumer Openness Index consumer survey, only 12 percent of British people said that they had a good understanding of what the bill involves.

    "There are widespread doubts over the definition, not to mention the definability, of a number of the terms used in the draft bill," Nicola Blackwood MP, chair of the Science & Technology Committee, told TechRadar. "The government must urgently review the legislation so that the obligations on the industry are clear and proportionate."

    In the same survey, half of respondents believed that "making personal data easier for government officials to access will also make it easier for criminals to access that data as well", while only 6 percent disagreed.

    The bill's progress through the UK parliament comes at a time when Apple is engaged in a high-profile dispute with the FBI, which wants its own backdoor into the company's software to unlock the iPhone at the center of the San Bernardino shooter investigation.

    Apple believes complying with the demand would set a dangerous precedent that could lead to the overall weakening of encryption on smartphones and other electronic devices. Apple is scheduled to appear in court to fight the order on March 22.

    Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

    Article Link: UK Parliamentary Bill Would Require Backdoors in Electronic Devices
     
  2. rdlink macrumors 68040

    rdlink

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  3. Crosscreek macrumors 68030

    Crosscreek

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    This is basically going to allow surveillance without even possession of a device.
     
  4. ArtOfWarfare macrumors 604

    ArtOfWarfare

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    If this were to pass, I'd continue using my commercial devices that predate the law (without any software changes), but would otherwise swap to non-commercial alternatives.
     
  5. Crosscreek macrumors 68030

    Crosscreek

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    It will not be long after this law takes effect that peoples devices will start getting hacked.
     
  6. Blujelly macrumors 65816

    Blujelly

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    They should sort the country out first, before this law comes in to play! That would be good to see
     
  7. BvizioN macrumors 68040

    BvizioN

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    Wtf is wrong with these governments? I hope their devices are the first to get hacked so all their nasty secrets get published to the world.
     
  8. Jimmy James macrumors 68040

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    Camera on every corner. Camera in every hand.

    I really wonder if Apple fails to comply, would the country actually disallow sales indefinitely. At that point it would seem like a People's Republic.
     
  9. Dagless macrumors Core

    Dagless

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    Sometimes I wish folk here were as passionate about this as Americans have been.
     
  10. jonnysods macrumors 601

    jonnysods

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    There is going to be a rouge device maker in some country that can't be regulated that will sell encrypted devices and these will be sold on the black market. Maybe they will even be disguised as iPhones and Samsungs so you don't get busted.
     
  11. Dagless macrumors Core

    Dagless

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    I'd say if these companies were paying the taxes they're supposed to, that ceasing their sales would be pretty harmful to the government. But as it stands...
     
  12. Blujelly macrumors 65816

    Blujelly

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    Anywhere within the M25 basically has a camera on the corner, look at it though s*** hole area. there would be a loop hole for Apple, or a law that would backfire on this new law where they could still continue to sell them.

    I'd be surprised if it goes through as easy as that, its the UK were talking about here. We don't do anything right.

    Remember this law isn't directed at Apple its against any device. As much as I see were you're coming from and it some way its against Apple (although lets face it Samsung doesn't have a problem like this..) it an all round law which as I said will have loop holes.

    Plus I think they need to remember how much TAX they make from Apple.
     
  13. ghost187 macrumors 6502a

    ghost187

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    If one country forces Apple to make a back door, than essentially it affects every iPhone in the world.

    I honestly believe (and hope) if Apple wins in the US and losses in a few insignificant countries, they will take the loss and say, screw your country, you don't want the iPhone, than you don't get the the iPhone. Because even if they win here in America, there is going to be one small country that will rule against Apple and try to ruin everything.

    Also, I'm not calling the UK small and insignificant, but if this law passed, than they deserve the insult.
     
  14. nicovh macrumors 6502

    nicovh

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  15. err404 macrumors 68020

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    So the law requires that every device has this capability, yet prevents companies from disclosing if they have in fact compiled? Isn't that redundant?
     
  16. sim667 macrumors 65816

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    Theresa May has consistently tried to remove any right to privacy since she became home secretary.

    The first draught of this was basically laughed out of Parliament, it would be interesting to see what the reaction is to this.
     
  17. bushido Suspended

    bushido

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    not surprised about the UK to be honest, i felt like theres a camera on every little corner when i was in London

    theyd be excluded with a special edition of course
     
  18. djcerla macrumors 65816

    djcerla

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    Not even Orwell could have envisioned the level of control and power a device like a spy smartphone would give to the government.

    And, of course, to the bandwagon of bad guys following suit thru the open door. This is Pandora's box.
     
  19. Porco macrumors 68030

    Porco

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    As a brit, I feel our government is a mixture of moronic and evil, and they both embarrass and terrify me.
     
  20. peterh988 macrumors 6502

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    Teresa May coming out with the lame "paedophiles and terrorists" line in 3...2...1....

    She initially wanted to ban 'encryption' before someone pointed out that would destroy all internet banking and commerce. Shows how much she knows about the subject.

    Sorry luv, we know how you abuse every law you get, no one trusts you on this, either.
     
  21. Blujelly macrumors 65816

    Blujelly

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    Correct London has near on a camera on every corner, come out of London by 3 miles and its a different story.
     
  22. CelestialToys macrumors 6502

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    Sadly this is the kind of thing that happens when you have a moronic right wing government in charge.
     
  23. Chupa Chupa macrumors G5

    Chupa Chupa

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    Not sure why the UK would need a backdoor. With cameras on every street corner officials could witness the passcode being entered. /sarc
     
  24. peterh988 macrumors 6502

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    Apart from her own, obviously. She (or people on her behalf) declined to provide details of her internet browsing history when requested (lawfully) under the Freedom of Information Act, yet she wants the right to see every site you visit.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/u...t-was-only-fair-to-ask-for-hers-a6785591.html
     
  25. magbarn macrumors 68000

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    You're sadly naive if you belive this is only a right wing issue lol!
     

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