Become a MacRumors Supporter for $25/year with no ads, private forums, and more!

dukebound85

macrumors P6
Original poster
Jul 17, 2005
18,739
3,519
5045 feet above sea level
What are the mod's views on thread bumping after a day or three if no one has responded in a thread that has no replies? Is this frowned upon the same as consecutive posting?
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,471
855
From Forum Rules:
Bumps. Posts that bring a thread to the top of the New Posts list but add no content to the thread (bumps) are not permitted. This applies not only to posts that say "bump" but to those with the intent to bump, e.g. posts saying "anyone?" or the equivalent.
I have some old threads that never got a response, but if I bump or post a new thread on the same topic, I violate forum rules. So I figure no one has the answer.
 

dukebound85

macrumors P6
Original poster
Jul 17, 2005
18,739
3,519
5045 feet above sea level
From Forum Rules:

I have some old threads that never got a response, but if I bump or post a new thread on the same topic, I violate forum rules. So I figure no one has the answer.

So if it is a question that needs assistance, what is the proper method to have it gain traction again? Start a redundant thread? I know that different members frequent the forums at different times so while you may not have luck initially, you may at a later point

Is there a sanctioned way for this?
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,471
855
So if it is a question that needs assistance, what is the proper method to have it gain traction again? Start a redundant thread? I know that different members frequent the forums at different times so while you may not have luck initially, you may at a later point

Is there a sanctioned way for this?

I haven't found one, other than searching for related threads on the same topic and posting your question in those, or searching the web with Google, to see if the same question has been posed in other forums. Starting duplicate threads is also against forum rules. You could also PM a poster that you think might have the answer.
 

Hellhammer

Moderator emeritus
Dec 10, 2008
22,164
581
Finland
IMO it should be allowed when certain time has passed (e.g. one day). Sometimes there are just so many threads that it gets buried under them. You can always be a smartarse and add something totally irrelevant crap in the bump post so it's not clearly a bump post :p
 

angelwatt

Moderator emeritus
Aug 16, 2005
7,852
7
USA
I'll give my opinion as someone who has reported a number of people for bumping. From my stance, if you want continued help, show that you're trying and care about getting a solution.

Instead of just saying "bump," talk about things you have tried in the mean time, or any progress you have made toward a solution. Often people give little detail about their problem. Re-read your original post and determine if someone unfamiliar with the problem/topic would be able to understand what you're talking about. Make sure your explanation of the problem is clear and that your question is clear.

In short, be clear in your questions, including what you have attempted, and giving relevant information about your Mac/problem that could be helpful in solving the problem. Though, don't write too long of a post either, because your question will get lost in it all. Be concise and precise.
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,471
855
Instead of just saying "bump," talk about things you have tried in the mean time, or any progress you have made toward a solution.
I agree this would be a reason to add to a thread. However, you run into the consecutive post rule. If you post a thread and no one responds, even if you have new meaningful information to add, the rules say you should edit your original post, rather than post consecutively. If you do that, your thread won't get bumped and no one will see that you edited your original post.
 

angelwatt

Moderator emeritus
Aug 16, 2005
7,852
7
USA
I agree this would be a reason to add to a thread. However, you run into the consecutive post rule. If you post a thread and no one responds, even if you have new meaningful information to add, the rules say you should edit your original post, rather than post consecutively. If you do that, your thread won't get bumped and no one will see that you edited your original post.

True, but the mods generally use creative interpretation (or the spirit of the rule) as well and if a day or more has passed, they likely wouldn't merge the posts unless it was really needed.
 

Doctor Q

Administrator
Staff member
Why and how to avoid bumping

There are two reasons for the blanket prohibition on bump posts:
  1. Calling attention to your own thread or post takes away from somebody else's thread or post, so it's not fair.
  2. Posts with no new content are annoying to other users.
The downside is that you can never say "It's been 10 years and my Mac still won't boot!", i.e., some users might not get help that they might get if they could bump.

We haven't adopted a compromise rule that would allow some bumps after some amount of time because it would complicate rules that are already rather voluminous and be harder for the moderators to administer. Some people get confused over even simple rules, so simpler is definitely better.

Here are some practical suggestions for people who have asked for help and are hoping somebody will respond to their post:
  1. Do something to get more information, or try another way to help yourself. If that doesn't solve the problem, add a post explaining the new information or telling what you tried. It's OK to post in your thread when you having something new to add, just not when you have nothing more to say than "anyone?".

  2. Search for and read more threads. It's not always easy to find all of the relevant threads, and you may have searched at least once before, but give it another try with other words or phrases you can think of. You may find clues or answers you hadn't seen before.

  3. Ask at another forum site. We don't want to drive our users away but when you have a problem forum "brand loyalty" should take a backseat. Post here, post at other forum sites, and even in Apple's discussion forums.

  4. More and more of us live near Apple Stores. A trip to you closest store can be fun (new goodies to play with!) and salespeople or geniuses may be able to help with your Mac, iPod, iPhone, iPad, or other issue. Just don't ask them for help with jailbreaking!

  5. If your lonely post was not a plea for help, just a discussion post, let it go. Sometimes what you think is interesting doesn't catch anyone else's fancy. I've had it happen myself.
For clarification, the rule about consecutive posts applies only when the posts are only a few minutes apart. If you have something new to say hours or days after a previous post, that's fine. Editing your previous post is fine too.
 
Last edited:

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,471
855
For clarification, the rule about consecutive posts applies only when the posts are only a few minutes apart. If you have something new to say hours or days after a previous post, that's fine. Editing your previous post is fine too, but if it's a "Help!" thread you'll want the "bump" you get from adding new information.

Thank you for this clarification! Now I wish we could do something about first-time posters who revive a 5-year old thread just to say "Thanks!" or "Cool! or to post a "solution" that doesn't work, then never post again.
 

-aggie-

macrumors P6
Jun 19, 2009
16,794
51
Where bunnies are welcome.
For clarification, the rule about consecutive posts applies only when the posts are only a few minutes apart. If you have something new to say hours or days after a previous post, that's fine. Editing your previous post is fine too, but if it's a "Help!" thread you'll want the "bump" you get from adding new information.

Thanks that clears up a lot. So, basically, if they don’t say “bump” or something to that effect, it’s okay.
 

angelwatt

Moderator emeritus
Aug 16, 2005
7,852
7
USA
Thanks that clears up a lot. So, basically, if they don’t say “bump” or something to that effect, it’s okay.

I'd say it's not about what they don't say, but about the relevancy of their post to moving the thread topic forward in a meaningful manner.
 

nizmoz

macrumors 65816
Jul 7, 2008
1,410
1
Well I did this and got a warning today. Because no one responded to my thread. I didn't just say bump, I had about a paragraph of stuff I wrote and I still got a warning. Per the Admin of this site, basically you aren't allowed to bump the thread for any reason. If no one responded, means no one had a answer per them.

I have been running forums like these since 1996. And sorry but bumping should be allowed to a point. After a few days they should be allowed to bump their thread if no one has responded. I waited 3-4 days then I posted again. Most of the time if no one has responded usually means it went past the first page and many will miss it as the forum is very active. This rule needs to be adjusted as I don't agree with it 100% and was unfairly warned. I had to ask the Admin on this site to fill me in on the procedure since the moderator who warned me ignored my pm.

I'll give my opinion as someone who has reported a number of people for bumping. From my stance, if you want continued help, show that you're trying and care about getting a solution.

Instead of just saying "bump," talk about things you have tried in the mean time, or any progress you have made toward a solution. Often people give little detail about their problem. Re-read your original post and determine if someone unfamiliar with the problem/topic would be able to understand what you're talking about. Make sure your explanation of the problem is clear and that your question is clear.

In short, be clear in your questions, including what you have attempted, and giving relevant information about your Mac/problem that could be helpful in solving the problem. Though, don't write too long of a post either, because your question will get lost in it all. Be concise and precise.
 
  • Like
Reactions: usagora

Rocketman

macrumors 603
Aside from the fact bumping is bad netiquette, and is not permissible on this site, I have seen it used frequently on other sites without netiquette or rules widely in the minds of posters. Franky, it simply does not work.
It does not achieve the goal of reigniting a conversation or adding new information. In fact it often causes a partially useful dormant thread to devolve into a war over the best bumper, the reasons not to bump, and other off-topic banter, that happens when there is not a valid and informative topic to distract the weaker minds among us.

Rocketman
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.