What Book Are You Reading?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Huntn, Jan 14, 2011.

  1. arkitect, Feb 12, 2019 at 3:40 AM
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019 at 3:45 AM

    arkitect macrumors 603

    arkitect

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    #6551
    It was rather.

    Amazing the lengths people (the forgers and scammers) will go to deceive, and the willingness of some people (more money than brains buyers) to suspend disbelief.

    Often the signs are blatantly obvious that the artwork is suspect — sketchy provenance, stylistic anomalies… and yet, and yet, people do so want to own a Jackson Pollock, Munch, Rothko that they disregard their common sense.

    Only later when they want to sell their "investment" does the awful truth dawn. "What do you mean it isn't worth USD17MM?"

    Greed and self delusion. Prime example? See DJT and his "Renoir".

    Edit:
    So out of curiousity and I often fall into these rabbit holes, I was looking at reserving the book "Fake : forgery, lies & eBay" at my library.
    Yes, one copy available. Great!
    Where?
    Her Majesty's Prison The Verne.
    Unable to place a reservation.

    I laughed.
     
  2. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #6552
    I remember reading an absolutely fascinating article some years ago about Han van Meegeran, the Dutch forger of Old Masters.

    And yes, the greed of would be buyers. Equally fascinating - why people would put good sense and prudent judgment aside in the greedy desire to own something of that sort.
     
  3. TPadden macrumors 6502a

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    #6553
    Ah, the old egoistic vs altruistic motive fascination; greed I understand.
     
  4. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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  5. arkitect macrumors 603

    arkitect

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    #6555
    Han van Meegeren… his fake Vermeers were actually rather awful.
    At first it was all about revenge on the art community for not recognising his true talent. So, he played out a theory by one of the eminent Vermeer experts of the time that Vermeer had travelled to Italy and had been influenced by Caravaggio among others… when van Meegeren's fake appeared this expert couldn't help himself and gave the fake his seal of authentication — the van Meegeren fake fitted his theory. And the rest of the experts followed like dominoes.

    Van Meegeren was paid a massive sum — equal to several million today — by a museum consortium.
    So he thought, "hummm… seems like easy money this." Didn't follow through by declaring the fraud and painted several more.
    Lived the high life on the French Riviera, spent money like water… drugs and alcohol.

    Of course the wheels came off after the war.
    --- Post Merged, Feb 13, 2019 at 3:32 AM ---
    The title puts me in mind of Sailing to Byzantium. :)
     
  6. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #6556
    Fascinating story; I read an article about him years ago, which was a lot more sanitised, (although it did mention the early rejections which fuelled the desire for revenge) and attempted to portray him (as he tried to portray himself) as a hero who painted fake Old Masters which duped the thieves representing the interests of Hitler and Goering who were busy robbing venerable European galleries (and private collections) in order amass their own private collections.

    It is meant to; Guy Gavriel Kay writes elegant works set in alternative versions of known historical worlds.
     
  7. T'hain Esh Kelch macrumors 601

    T'hain Esh Kelch

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    #6557
    Warbreaker by Brian Sanderson. Your standard high fantasy tale, yet one that is well developed as with everything Sanderson writes. Lots of underlying questions, and a good story and plenty of lovely characters, so I will also read the next one. Unfortunately he is a busy fellow, and the sequel is low on his list of sequels to write for his other worlds. Will likely land on a 5/5.
    I am listening to it on audiobook from graphicaudiointernational.net, and I must say I really enjoy that. They use a full cast, and provide music and ambient noise and voices, to provide a really deep portrayal of the book. Definitely not the last time I've bought something from them.

    Also reading The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin. A quite different approach to the apocalyptic scifi setting, where some people can interact with earth, and there are weird beings an flying obelisks around. It is written a little bit weirdly, and a few minor parts are quite dull, but overall the story is good. Will go for the sequel also, and likely land on a 4/5 at this point with 20% of the book left. Both it and it sequel got the Hugo, so I was expecting something good.

    Recently finished War Horse by Michael Morpurgo. 4/5. Fine story, but completely not what I thought it was, as I didn't know it was a childrens book!
    Also reread Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradburry, which is one of my favorites. 5/5.

    Next up after Warbreaker, 1984 I think. I found it surprisingly dull the first time I listened to it, so lets see how I find it the second time around.
     
  8. Markdc macrumors newbie

    Markdc

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    #6558
    Hi,
    Just finished "the subtle art of not giving a ****"
     
  9. Gutwrench Contributor

    Gutwrench

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    #6559
    Mark Manson. I quote him here and there. Lol.
     
  10. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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  11. LizKat macrumors 601

    LizKat

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    #6561
    LOL --and still laughing-- at the material in your edit.

    Signing off the internet on a high note of the day, thanks. :)
     
  12. Zenithal macrumors 604

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    #6562
    Continuing on that discussion, I'm reminded of Adolf Bergur. I forget his real life discrepancies, but a film was made based on his time in a camp during the war. And some American film came out months ago about a then shamed author who turned to forging typewritten letters to make ends meet.
     
  13. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #6563
    @Zenithal: When I see "American movie" and "historical event" in the one sentence, I find myself responding with either frank - and sometimes startled - disbelief, (because, as an historian, I usually have some knowledge of what form the arc of that narrative should take) or the older "willing suspension of disbelief" that accompanies one's trips to the theatre.
     
  14. Zenithal macrumors 604

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    Sep 10, 2009
    #6564
    In reference to? I found the names of the films. I did some research on the second film, and any articles referencing its accuracy in relation to history and the late author's memoir put it at 90-95% accurate. They glimpsed over some less than important details, like her friend at the time's nationality and other minor issues that don't affect the film. Worth noting the film didn't have a large run.

    As for the first film. It wasn't American, it was Austrian-German produced, a dual effort. I know little of Bergur and his actions apart from how he was portrayed in the film. For all I know the film could have several inaccuracies. Though it is worth teasing that Philomena took several of its own side-tracks and that wasn't produced by the Americans. In fact, having read both Sixsmith's book years before the film came out and having seen the film, the film was an abomination.

    I bring up that specific film and book because I know you've both read it and have seen the film. So while the Americans have taken their fair share of artistic license over the years, others are not immune to it. Even one of my favorite author, Nick Hornby, has had a few of his adapted works butchered by both the Americans and the British.
     

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