Spoilers What Book Are You Reading?

mikzn

macrumors 68000
Sep 2, 2013
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Vancouver
I've read most of the Brian Herbert and Kevin J Anderson works.

the're just not the same. Often times they read like fanfiction at best. Many of the sequels in particular that were "based" on notes from Frank herbert seem so out of touch with the direction that Frank went with his books that he did write that it's unfathomable that it's what he intended.

the "final" two books in particular that were supposed to "finish" the original series feel so far out of left field that It doesn't actually even feel like "dune"

I also don't think Kevin J Anderson's writing style works for Dune. he's great for action, and adventure writing. He can keep up the pace for "fluff" style writing great. Thoroughly entertaining, but not very deep in meaning. And Frank herbert's writing was completely opposite of that. it was immensely deep, if sometimes slow in story progression. the opposite writing styles of the authors, combined with Brian Herbert's interpretation of the stories just always made that work feel... off.

I know that Frank was long dead when these books got started. But I feel like there might have been better choices out there than Briand and Kevin to finish off the story.

I really enjoyed the prequels - bought every new book in "hard cover" when first avaiable - especially the machine crusade era books because it was referred to in the originals and because I think Keven J Anderson is a terrific writer ( ie Assemblers of Infinity) etc
 

RootBeerMan

macrumors 65816
Jan 3, 2016
1,365
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Finally started "Stars and Stripes Triumphant", the final volume of Harry Harrison's alt history of a war between America and Great Britain that interrupted the Civil War an reunited America. Awesome trilogy.

 
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JBGoode

macrumors 6502a
Jun 16, 2018
719
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The Outsider by Stephen King. I like the story well enough however this is really a novella pretending to be a 500 page book. I was probably about 40% in before the story went beyond the dust jacket synopsis. I’m a big King fan and this is one of the first times I’ve noticed just how wordy he can be without actually saying much.
 
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Huntn

macrumors demi-god
Original poster
May 5, 2008
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The Misty Mountains
The Outsider by Stephen King. I like the story well enough however this is really a novella pretending to be a 500 page book. I was probably about 40% in before the story went beyond the dust jacket synopsis. I’m a big King fan and this is one of the first times I’ve noticed just how wordy he can be without actually saying much.
I think I’m done with SK. I read bunches of his books and then burned out on his writing style. Some pretty excellent stories though.
 

JBGoode

macrumors 6502a
Jun 16, 2018
719
1,032
I think I’m done with SK. I read bunches of his books and then burned out on his writing style. Some pretty excellent stories though.
I tend to agree and think he peaked years ago. Although I still read most of his books, I no longer rush to read them and it’s usually a year or two before I get to his latest releases. Nothing beats his early stuff like The Shining, Salem’s Lot, Christine, etc.

His son Joe Hill writes some ok stuff although I did not care for his last one either. (The Fireman)
 
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Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
49,127
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The Far Horizon
The Deed of Paksenarrion - by Elizabeth Moon.
The sequels to Paksenarrion are also excellent, and her space series - Heris Serrano (and the sequels to that) are superb.

Elizabeth Moon's knowledge of military life (she served as a lieutenant in the Marines) - and mastery of military details, not just battles in whatever setting she writes about, but also mundane life in camp, the necessity of mastering basic stuff such as latrines, discipline, training, the influence of cliques, petty rivalries, ambitions, means that there is a sense of realism in hoe she depicts military life in both her fantasy (the Paksenarron series) works, and and her space fantasy series (Heris Serrano).
 

Macky-Mac

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May 18, 2004
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Reading Agent Running In The Field by master of spy novels John le Carré. Excellent read so far tying in Brexit and Trump into the storyline.
I considered that one but decided to wait.......ended up reading his A Perfect Spy, which I enjoyed greatly
 
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neutrino23

macrumors 68000
Feb 14, 2003
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SF Bay area
The End of Alzheimer’s by Dale Bredesen.

Really interesting book about the microbiology of the disease and how to prevent it and treat it. The key theme is that this is not one disease but the brain’s reaction to many different influences.
 
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mward333

macrumors 6502a
Jan 24, 2004
563
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I just ordered "The Mirror & The Light" by Hilary Mantel for my wife.
This is the 3rd book in a trilogy.
The 1st and 2nd books in the trilogy each won the Booker Prize,
so this 3rd book is highly anticipated. It comes out in March. Exciting!
 

ucfgrad93

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Aug 17, 2007
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Colorado
It's good :) It's not an account of every battle and every president's life; it is an account of the major movements, legislation, Supreme court decisions, and a chronology of the American zeitgeist. It's long, but it's keeping my attention. I would recommend it.
Thanks for the update.
 

Falhófnir

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Aug 19, 2017
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The Whispering Skull - Jonathan Stroud.
I enjoyed the Bartimaeus Trilogy by Stroud, though think it's one of those works I wouldn't count among my favourites or be especially inclined to read again (I'd put His Dark Materials and The Spiderwick Chronicles in the same category).
 

Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
49,127
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The Far Horizon
I enjoyed the Bartimaeus Trilogy by Stroud, though think it's one of those works I wouldn't count among my favourites or be especially inclined to read again (I'd put His Dark Materials and The Spiderwick Chronicles in the same category).
I thoroughly enjoyed the Bartimaeus trilogy (by Jonathan Stroud), which was extremely good and thoughtful, - and also thought provoking, but I will beg to differ from you re His Dark Materials (by Philip Pullman), as I think that this is an entirely different level re plot, character, depth, with a richness of world development and strength of setting, character and plot; that is a superb series, richly rewarding a re-read, and is both profound and powerful, (if not especially reassuring).

Now, I must admit that I have yet to read The Spiderwick Chronicles - do you recommend them?
 
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Falhófnir

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I thoroughly enjoyed the Bartimaeus trilogy (by Jonathan Stroud), which was extremely good and thoughtful, - and also thought provoking, but I will beg to differ from you re His Dark Materials (by Philip Pullman), as I think that this is an entirely different level re plot, character, depth, with a richness of world development and strength of setting, character and plot; that is a superb series, richly rewarding a re-read, and is both profound and powerful, (if not especially reassuring).

Now, I must admit that I have yet to read The Spiderwick Chronicles - do you recommend them?
HDM was a read spurred by the film, I think I tend to really like the more fantastical and this was a series light on that. I won't deny it's technically accomplished, but didn't find the tone of the series or the atmosphere of the world particularly compelling. Perhaps I was too young (circa 12/13) to fully appreciate it (though it is marketed as a children's book)? From memory Spiderwick (Holly Black/ Tony DiTerlizzi) is just as I said, worth a read if you're at a loose end, but not an earth moving must-read by any means.
 

Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
49,127
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The Far Horizon
HDM was a read spurred by the film, I think I tend to really like the more fantastical and this was a series light on that. I won't deny it's technically accomplished, but didn't find the tone of the series or the atmosphere of the world particularly compelling. Perhaps I was too young (circa 12/13) to fully appreciate it (though it is marketed as a children's book)? From memory Spiderwick (Holly Black/ Tony DiTerlizzi) is just as I said, worth a read if you're at a loose end, but not an earth moving must-read by any means.
Actually, I'd class His Dark Materials as YA reading, rather than - strictly speaking - children's reading; among other things, it asks quite a bit of the reader.

Personally, I loved the idea of a strong female protagonist (which was not usual in literature published at the time), and the book is deep, and dark and wonderfully challenging, but is one that asks quite a bit of a young reader, certainly anyone who is a bit younger than a teenager.
 

Falhófnir

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Aug 19, 2017
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Actually, I'd class His Dark Materials as YA reading, rather than - strictly speaking - children's reading; among other things, it asks quite a bit of the reader.

Personally, I loved the idea of a strong female protagonist (which was not usual in literature published at the time), and the book is deep, and dark and wonderfully challenging, but is one that asks quite a bit of a young reader, certainly anyone who is a bit younger than a teenager.
My recollection would probably be bleak more than dark as such. I just seem to remember it felt like a world of precious little comfort, both in an environmental and interpersonal respect. Perhaps one day I will have to try and give it another try with an open mind if I can shake the colour of my first read-through. I believe it's being made into a Netflix series so I might try that first.