Why do we say "pull" when referring to driving?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by senseless, Nov 15, 2011.

  1. senseless macrumors 68000

    senseless

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    #1
    Why is it "pull away" or "he pulled out in front of me" or "pull out of the lot"? What kind of pulling is going on and what is the origin of this expression?
     
  2. applefan289 macrumors 68000

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    #2
    When you say "pull over", maybe it means to pull the steering wheel. For example, when you say "pull away", it means to pull the steering wheel in the direction that will move the car "away", or in the previous case "over [to the side of the road]".
     
  3. wpotere Guest

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    #3
    or maybe the first "cars" were actually horse drawn buggies and wagons that were pulled.

    Just a guess...
     
  4. wordoflife macrumors 604

    wordoflife

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    #4
    Well, it's under my Mac dictionary in the way that you used pulled in the OP. If you have a Mac, check it out.
     
  5. AlphaDogg macrumors 68040

    AlphaDogg

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    #5
    Here you go:

     
  6. senseless thread starter macrumors 68000

    senseless

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    #6
    Interesting; this is a widely used word. It could well be from pulling the steering wheel, maybe when power steering was unknown or it could have something to do with teamsters pulling the horses' reins.
     
  7. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #7
    I'd imagine this vocabulary came from the days of horse drawn carriages and vehicles; one would pull at the reins when seeking to make a horse slow down, or pull up, and pull over when asked to do so by another rider or pedestrian.
     
  8. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    #8
    Older tank drivers too, with the tracks being controlled by two clutch "handles". ;)
     
  9. Mac2012 macrumors regular

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    #9
    Or like "pull your head out of you @#!" ????
    Why would you start a thread about this? Are you that bored? Wow...:eek:
    Use these BBB for this?
     
  10. jbennardo macrumors 6502a

    jbennardo

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    #10
    probably the same reason we say "take a dump" :D
     
  11. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #11
    Why ever not? The evolution and history of words, what words we use, how meanings change or are altered over time, and how we choose to express ourselves is actually very interesting.

    In addition, words are not merely descriptive, they serve also to convey values and attitudes as well, and are a fascinating marker, or indicator, of how a society, or culture chooses to express and define itself.

    Until this thread appeared, I had never given a thought to the verb 'pull' as used in motor cars, and I thank the OP for posting it.
     
  12. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    #12
    Just another newbie, marking his territory.
     
  13. Grey Beard macrumors 65816

    Grey Beard

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    #13
    Probably relates to the number of wankers there are on the American Roads. Though I suppose we have our fair share of tossers down here.

    KGB:rolleyes:
     
  14. Gregg2, Nov 17, 2011
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2011

    Gregg2 macrumors 603

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    #14
  15. senseless thread starter macrumors 68000

    senseless

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    #15
    C'mon, now. You know how many "Black or White iPhone" threads I've endured?
     

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