Your Favorite Book

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Jmona, Jul 19, 2015.

  1. Jmona macrumors 6502a

    Jmona

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    #1
    I know that there are several posts on this forum in regards of books, however I have looked and haven't found one except for the "What book are you reading now" that has hardly answered my question but found great recommendations there.
    And that is; what is your favorite book in the world and why?

    For my birthday, when family and friends want to surprise me with something, I make it easy for them. I always ask of them to gift me their favorite book and so far I've read a great amount of amazing literature out there thanks to that which its been happening for the last 20 years. :)

    So having said that, What is your favorite book in the whole world, and if its too hard to choose, please post your top 10. :) or 20 :p
     
  2. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #2
    The favorite book in the world is the Bible, Why because it details God's plan of salvation that I've come to embrace :)
     
  3. Gutwrench macrumors 65816

    Gutwrench

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    #3
    I generally read non-fiction but a book that stands out in my memory is Waiting by Ha Jin. I think I liked it so much because I find Chinese history and culture very interesting.

    Nearly any book of poetry by Mary Oliver. I have many. I marvel at the precision of words skilled writers possess.
     
  4. AlliFlowers Contributor

    AlliFlowers

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    #4
    Swan Song by Robert R. McCammon. Post apocalypse epic battle between good and evil.
     
  5. ucfgrad93, Jul 19, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2015

    ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

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    #5
    Agreed, I try to read it every day.
     
  6. LadyX macrumors 68020

    LadyX

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    #6
    The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. An adventure thriller set in post-Napoleonic France.
     
  7. CrickettGrrrl macrumors 6502a

    CrickettGrrrl

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    #7
    Only one? That is an impossible question. Four books, off the top of my head, which would make me feel incredibly sad never to reread again are:
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (My perspective changes every time I read it, and now to my great surprise, I even have a bit of sympathy for Huck's father.)
    Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency by Douglas Adams
    The Long Dark Tea Time of the Soul by Douglas Adams
    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

    ---
    I anticipate smacking myself on the forehead in about 20 minutes for having forgotten at least 5 personal essential books.
     
  8. Ulenspiegel macrumors 68020

    Ulenspiegel

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    #8
    Herman Wouk: "The Hope", "The Glory".
    Michael Barak: "The Secret List of Heinrich Roehm".
    Robert Moss: "Moscow Rules".
    Robert Ludlum Jason Bourne Trilogy.
    Dan Brown: "Angels and Demons".
    José Rodrigues dos Santos: "A Fórmula de Deus".
    Boris Vian: "J’irai cracher sur vos tombes", "Elles se rendent pas compte".
    Wesley Allison: "Princess of Amathar".
    etc.
     
  9. T'hain Esh Kelch macrumors 601

    T'hain Esh Kelch

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  10. Jmona thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Jmona

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    #10
    This one might be unheard of but, i have a small list of books I've read, been read to and reading to my children which I love very much.
    Favorite books list.
    The Manual of the Warrior of Light by Paulo Coelho
    The Hobbit, LOTR and Silmarillion by JRR Tolkien.
    Moby Dick by Herman Merville
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    One Hundred Years of Solitude by Garcia Márquez
    In Search of Lost Time by Marcel Proust
    Harry Potter Series by JK Rowling
    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    And Dune by Frank Herbert who co-wrote several other novels with my good friend Kevin J Anderson which I've got to say Clockwork Angels is one of the most fascinating books I've read in a longtime.
    Now that I've read to my children are some of the above mentioned including the Enderverse series by Orson Scott Card's Ender's Game which is my 8 year olds son favorite book in the world. He's read that book and Ender's Shadow so many times for such a young age. He is a bookworm like his Mom.



    Edit:
    I'm aware that Orson Scott Card is homophobic and although I'm against it, the Enderverse series are very good and I enjoyed them very much growing up. No one is perfect.
     
  11. lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

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    #11
    Twilight of the idols - Nietzsche
    Treatise on the Gods - H.L. Mencken
     
  12. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #12
    I am a pretty avid reader, yet I would find it very hard to refer to a single title as 'my favourite book'.

    If it is about history (and I read a lot of history), - or politics - I want a book to be beautifully written, with wit and insight, as well as one that teaches me something new, or makes me look at something old in a new way. A book that straddles literature and history, a book where it is clear that the author is enthused by the subject being written about, and wishes to share this delight and enthusiasm with his or her readers.

    Re fiction, it must be transformative; I ask of a memorable (or 'favourite', one that I wold wish to re-read) that it be well written, and tell a really good story, one that you can lose yourself in, without excessive self-indulgence or coy cleverness, on the author's part.
     
  13. cambookpro macrumors 603

    cambookpro

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    #13
    Hard to narrow it down to one. A few of my favourite novels are The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon, The Great Gatsby by F Scott Fitzgerald, The Turn of the Screw by Henry James and The Go-Between by LP Hartley.

    I've probably missed out some better ones, but they're the books I thought of off the top of my head!
     
  14. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #14
    Well, good historical and political writing is telling a story, as is good fiction.

    One of my own personal all time favourites is a piece of work that manages to be a stunning work of extraordinary political and philosophical insight, a savagely brilliant story, and a piece of writing delivered in an impeccable, and deceptively clear prose. This is 'Animal Farm' by George Orwell.
     
  15. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #15
    Tough question here!

    While I would go off of some things I've read recently (like the entire Velgarth/Valdemar series by Mercedes Lackey), leadership books (which mainly go toward my business), I'd say that my favourite book would have to be Le Petit Prince, by Antoine de Saint-Exupery.

    Why? well, two reasons. At the time (around 1984-1985), I found one of my mother's old college textbooks (I still have to this day), Basic Conversational French. I read that book back and forth, even though I knew nothing of the language. It was the scent of an old musty library book that kept me going back to it. Around that time, the cartoon based on this book aired in the US (I didn't know it was anime, nor made 6 years prior; Subsequently, the series was just re-released on DVD), which I not only found the book in my school's library, but next to it was the original print of it, completely in French. It fortified my wanting to learn French.

    Second, and most importantly, as a reviewer had said, the book was an allegory of Saint-Exupéry's own life—his search for childhood certainties and interior peace, his mysticism, his belief in human courage and brotherhood.

    In reading it, it reminds me of the simple, free, happy, and peaceful innocence of children. Something I actually wish I had again, especially now with having children of my own. There is the old saying of "If I knew then what I know now..." Well, I'm glad I didn't know then what I know now, as when you think about all the trials and tribulations in your life now, your life was much happier back then. If your world came crashing down, back then you knew that you could fix that by just going outside and playing. To have your youth, innocence of a child, and a wide open mind.. something one always yearns for.

    As soon as I found them, again, I picked up two copies: Le Petit Prince, and The Little Prince (read: in French and English). I haven't read them in a while, because I see in my children what I see in the book, and with as much enjoyment that I get out of reading, playing with my children seems to take up all my free time. :)

    BL.
     
  16. Khalanad75 macrumors 6502

    Khalanad75

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    #16
    Ariel: A book of the change by Steven R Boyett. One of my first adventures with dystopian worlds.
     
  17. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #17
    A book I very much enjoyed as a teenager.

    Reading your list, it strikes me that I seem to have read almost all of those books, and agree that they are excellent.

    I remember finding 'A Hundred Years Of Solitude' haunting; from a related stable, I thought that Vargas Llosa's superb 'The Feast of the Goat' was outstanding, but it is 'realist' (very realist) rather than magical realist in tackling similar and related subject matter.
     
  18. diggy33 macrumors 6502

    diggy33

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    #18
    Watership Down by Richard Adams. Its been my favorite book since I was a little kid.
     
  19. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #19
    Two I rather liked from the 1990s were 'Captain Corelli's Mandolin' by Louis de Bernieres, and 'Miss Smilla's Feeling For Snow' by Peter Hoeg.
     
  20. Huntn, Jul 31, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2015

    Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #20
    I don't have a single favorite, it's too hard to choose. However a very small sampling of favorites:

    A Song of Ice and Fie
    The Hobbit
    Lord of the Rings
    To Kill A Mockingbird
    Three Musketeers
    Count of Monte Cristo
    Dracula
    The Martian Chronicles
    Honor Harrington Series
    Southern Vampire Mystery series
    The Eiger Sanction
    Shibumi
    For Whom The Bell Tolls
    Catcher in the Rye
    Slaughterhouse Five
    The Shining
    Skeleton Crew
    Winds of War
    The Killer Angels
    Tess of the d'Urbervilles
    The Borne Identity
    Deliverance
    Gone With The Wind
    Harry Potter series
     
  21. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #21
    Would anyone else include 'East of Eden'? To my mind, it is John Steinbeck's best book by far, a genuine tour de force.
     
  22. Jmona thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Jmona

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    #22
    I have to say. I recently finished "The Martian" by Andy Weir and is by far one of the most science accurate books I've ever read if not one of the top 10 I've ever read. So. Needless to say, this one is bumping down quite a few of my old favorites. Book is FANFRIGGINTASTIC!
     
  23. Khalanad75 macrumors 6502

    Khalanad75

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    #23
    Is this the one the movie is being made from?
     
  24. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #24
    And, yes, I would include the Harry Potter series on any such list; something tells me that this series will very likely stand the test of time.
     
  25. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #25
    I think I'll go on record in saying that this list is in pretty much good taste, because out of the 30 books listed here, half of them are on the banned list. ;)

    BL.
     

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