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The first seemingly legitimate Geekbench 5 result for the base model 14-inch MacBook Pro with an 8-core M1 Pro chip has surfaced, and it reveals that the 8-core model is, as expected, ~20% slower than 10-core models in terms of multi-core performance. The 10-core model has 8 performance cores and 2 efficiency cores, while the 8-core model has 6 performance cores and 2 efficiency cores.

14-inch-macbook-pro.jpg

The benchmark result lists the 8-core 14-inch MacBook Pro with a multi-core score of 9,948, which is around 20% lower than the average multi-core score of around 12,700 for 14-inch MacBook Pro models configured with a 10-core M1 Pro or M1 Max chip. Keep in mind this is only a single result, so additional results are needed for certainty.

For single-core performance, the 8-core M1 Pro chip has approximately the same score as the standard M1 chip, the M1 Pro chip, and the M1 Max chip.

For multi-core performance, the 8-core M1 Pro chip is about 30% faster than the standard M1 chip, which also has 8-cores (4 performance, 4 efficiency).

Geekbench Scores

  • M1 (8-core) Single: 1742 Multi: 7582
  • M1 Pro (8-core) Single: 1767 Multi: 9948
  • M1 Max (10-core) Single: 1764 Multi: 12380
The base model 14-inch MacBook Pro with an 8-core M1 Pro chip is priced at $1,999 in the United States. Customers can upgrade this configuration to a 10-core M1 Pro chip with a 14-core GPU for an extra $200, raising the total price to $2,199.

The new 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pro models became available to order on Monday and have started shipping to some customers ahead of a Tuesday, October 26 launch. In addition to M1 Pro and M1 Max chip options, the notebooks feature mini-LED displays with ProMotion for up to a 120Hz refresh rate, additional ports like an HDMI port and an SD card slot, MagSafe charging, longer battery life, and a notch housing an upgraded 1080p webcam.

Article Link: 8-Core 14-Inch MacBook Pro Around 20% Slower Than 10-Core Models in Multi-Core Benchmark
 
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arn

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macintoshmac

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You REALLY don't want to trash chips nowadays. Binning is the way to go.

I just wonder how much of a chip lotto that would be for consumers. Within some spec, yes, but still. We never know what sort of issues those chips might show under what sort of usage, and the computers could be well out of warranty by then if people did not take AppleCare along with.

I might be more comfortable using the 10-core knowing that this was more within spec than the 8-core.
 

Realityck

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arn

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arn

macrumors god
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Interesting thought but given the die's 5 nm architecture can you imagine the precision involved to clef a cut like that. Then you would need to make sure the substrate connections were all terminated.

Ya, I don't know about feasibility, but would make sense if they can.

I can't find it now, but there was speculation that Apple photoshopped out sections of the chip that might show evidence that there were more interconnects for presumably a Mac Pro version.
 
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