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Apple References Unreleased 2020 16-Inch MacBook Pro in Boot Camp Update

moonwalk

macrumors member
Jul 14, 2009
73
57
One more Intel Mac? Good, which means we will have several more years of support for Intel machines.
Forbes: New MacBook Pro Leak Reveals Apple’s Powerful Update


“The bigger question is just how much ongoing support Apple will be offering the Intel machines. An Intel-powered MacBook purchased today will need physical support for servicing for a number of years, and that’s relatively easy to offer. Software support is the key.

Apple is moving aggressively towards ARM, with the full product line to be switched over within two years. Given that push towards the new system, will Intel still receive ‘Apple's new toys’ over the next few years? Will apps from key developers continue to be updated with the latest features? Can the ecosystem work with the advantages of ARM and still deliver on Intel?

It’s a question that I hope Apple answers when it launches the ARM-based Macs to the public. I’m sure there will be lots of reassurances about the the compatibility of the new machines, their increased performance, and the modern design. What I want to hear - and what many prospective buyers want to hear - is what’s going to happen in the medium- to long-term with support for the Intel machines.

The 16-inch MacBook Pro is a hefty investment. Knowing how long it will receive the fullest support of Apple is just as important as the specifications.”
 
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chucker23n1

macrumors 601
Dec 7, 2014
4,643
5,831
LOL

As the owner of an "Early 2013" macbook pro, as opposed to a "Late 2013" macbook pro, I have to disagree with you.

Looking at history, CPU changes (as was the case with the 2013 models) appear to drive the Model update.

Yeah, but the move from early 2013 to late 2013 is rather significant in some ways — it goes from Ivy Bridge to Haswell, which critically adds AES-NI, making FileVault 2 much faster (among other things).

A higher GPU option is nice but doesn't really needle.
 

chucker23n1

macrumors 601
Dec 7, 2014
4,643
5,831
Forbes: New MacBook Pro Leak Reveals Apple’s Powerful Update


“The bigger question is just how much ongoing support Apple will be offering the Intel machines. An Intel-powered MacBook purchased today will need physical support for servicing for a number of years, and that’s relatively easy to offer. Software support is the key.

Apple is moving aggressively towards ARM, with the full product line to be switched over within two years. Given that push towards the new system, will Intel still receive ‘Apple's new toys’ over the next few years? Will apps from key developers continue to be updated with the latest features? Can the ecosystem work with the advantages of ARM and still deliver on Intel?

It’s a question that I hope Apple answers when it launches the ARM-based Macs to the public. I’m sure there will be lots of reassurances about the the compatibility of the new machines, their increased performance, and the modern design. What I want to hear - and what many prospective buyers want to hear - is what’s going to happen in the medium- to long-term with support for the Intel machines.

The 16-inch MacBook Pro is a hefty investment. Knowing how long it will receive the fullest support of Apple is just as important as the specifications.”
That… article doesn't really correspond with its title.

There is a leak of sorts, but we don't really know anything about it being "powerful".
 

Brian Y

macrumors 68040
Oct 21, 2012
3,702
885
The 16-inch Macbook Pro was "updated" to be configurable to have Radeon Pro 5600M in June 2020. Maybe Apple considered this a sufficient spec-bump to warrant the year designation? In other words, could that be the "2020" model Apple is referring to?

Nope, those are still classified as 2019 models. They have a "stock" configuration including that GPU which is model MY222XX/A which is listed as a 2019 one.
 
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Thathsara Amarasinghe

macrumors newbie
Oct 29, 2020
1
0
Honestly, I've waited too long... I didn't even know that there were new GPU upgrades until last month or so... they really should make a new update, and I'm excited to see the new ARM chips that Apple will put in their new Macs instead of Intel... I'm also hoping for a price-drop.
 

LinkRS

macrumors regular
Oct 16, 2014
172
126
Texas, USA
That is strange since I am able to use it ok.
Visual Studio for Mac is completely different than Visual Studio for Windows. On Mac it is basically just a re-brand of what used to be called Xamarin Studio. It is great and works fine if you are developing .NET applications. On Windows, Visual Studio can do .NET, C, and C++ out of the box. I purchased the 16" 2019 MacBook Pro this past May, and opted for the first time, ,to NOT install a Windows VM or use BootCamp. That was when I discovered that Visual Studio for Mac did not support all of the same options as the Windows counterpart. So, now I can use Visual Studio Code or XCode for C++ development, not Visual Studio.
 
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theSeb

macrumors 604
Aug 10, 2010
7,154
1,040
Poole, England
Visual Studio for Mac is completely different than Visual Studio for Windows. On Mac it is basically just a re-brand of what used to be called Xamarin Studio. It is great and works fine if you are developing .NET applications. On Windows, Visual Studio can do .NET, C, and C++ out of the box. I purchased the 16" 2019 MacBook Pro this past May, and opted for the first time, ,to NOT install a Windows VM or use BootCamp. That was when I discovered that Visual Studio for Mac did not support all of the same options as the Windows counterpart. So, now I can use Visual Studio Code or XCode for C++ development, not Visual Studio.
I use Visual Studio in both Windows and Mac OS. I was replying to the rather strong opinoin of the poster that "VS for Mac is basically unusable,"

I disagree that it's unusable.
 

LinkRS

macrumors regular
Oct 16, 2014
172
126
Texas, USA
I use Visual Studio in both Windows and Mac OS. I was replying to the rather strong opinoin of the poster that "VS for Mac is basically unusable,"

I disagree that it's unusable.
I concur with your unusable statement 1000%, it is far from unsuable if your target is .NET. I was just (poorly, sorry :-() trying to point out how it could be considered unsuable for some, if your target was NOT .NET. I used it back when it was still Xamarin Studio, and was very happpy when it became Visual Studio for Mac. However, I was disspointed that it was not the same as the Windows version though. Thanks!
 
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Babygotfont

macrumors 6502
May 16, 2016
294
268
Windows 10 is fully capable of running on ARM, so I see no reason why there couldn't be a Boot Camp for ARM based Macs. Not to mention that there's several Linux distros that can run on ARM, as well - no shortage of OSs to want to dual boot an Apple Silicon Mac with.
It’s a MS licensing issue ... same with virtualizing MS WinArm on MacOSArm
 

Babygotfont

macrumors 6502
May 16, 2016
294
268
Parallels, Fusion and Virtual box are all virtualization platforms, not emulation platforms. The latter (like Rosetta 2) has a massive overhead in terms of performance, often encounters issues - especially with purpose built, highly optimized software like CAD and 3d applications, and definitely isn't supported by the vendors.

Porting from x86/x64 to ARM isn't as simple as recompiling, especially for something like a kernel, or other applications that have highly optimized code (and in many cases, assembly).

You picked the worst of the three platforms - Fusion works really well. One of the top use cases for Fusion is running AutoCAD and Solidworks on Macs for example. If they didn't port those packages to MacOS when it was on Intel, they're sure as heck not going to bother when it's on ARM. It's an order of magnitude more work.
Rosetta/2 took an installation time approach not runtime ... the overhead is at install time
 

ArtOfWarfare

macrumors G3
Nov 26, 2007
8,937
4,784
It’s a MS licensing issue ... same with virtualizing MS WinArm on MacOSArm

This sounds weird. Does MS have some kind of agreement that Windows can't be generally installed on non-Intel powered CPUs?

Or is Microsoft just looking to duplicate Apple and shift Windows to exclusively running on Microsoft hardware as Intel based PCs die?

I'd imagine people can still run Windows 10 illegally on Apple Silicon, or Microsoft can just name whatever price they want people to pay to install Windows on Apple Silicon.
 

chucker23n1

macrumors 601
Dec 7, 2014
4,643
5,831
This sounds weird. Does MS have some kind of agreement that Windows can't be generally installed on non-Intel powered CPUs?

There's simply no non-OEM version of Windows on ARM. You can't buy a Windows 10 retail copy for ARM.

Or is Microsoft just looking to duplicate Apple and shift Windows to exclusively running on Microsoft hardware as Intel based PCs die?

I think at some point, that was the plan, yes.

I'd imagine people can still run Windows 10 illegally on Apple Silicon, or Microsoft can just name whatever price they want people to pay to install Windows on Apple Silicon.

Yup.
 

Chocomonsters

macrumors regular
May 22, 2007
148
28
This sounds weird. Does MS have some kind of agreement that Windows can't be generally installed on non-Intel powered CPUs?

Or is Microsoft just looking to duplicate Apple and shift Windows to exclusively running on Microsoft hardware as Intel based PCs die?

I'd imagine people can still run Windows 10 illegally on Apple Silicon, or Microsoft can just name whatever price they want people to pay to install Windows on Apple Silicon.
Without MS blessing, Apple will not release drivers. Yes, you can try. But that will be trying to run Windows 10 on current Apple hardware without any bootcamp drivers.
 

simonmet

Cancelled
Sep 9, 2012
2,666
3,652
Sydney
Without MS blessing, Apple will not release drivers. Yes, you can try. But that will be trying to run Windows 10 on current Apple hardware without any bootcamp drivers.

I don’t think Apple needs Microsoft’s blessing, whether they have it or not. That said, without the Apple-supplied drivers, Windows on Mac might be a no go and certainly won’t be as simple to set up.

There are alternative trackpad drivers available, but I’m not sure if it’s possible to replicate or replace all the others; Touch Bar especially. I wouldn’t put it past people to give it a good shot however.
 
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