Dual cinema displays - how do speakers work?

PERydell2

macrumors newbie
Original poster
May 1, 2005
12
0
I wonder if anyone has a setup with two 24 inch cinema displays that have speakers integrated into them...

How do the speakers work? Do you run a USB cable to each monitor so you have both sets of speakers working at the same time? Can you configure the monitor on the left to just play audio for the left channel and the monitor on the right to play just audio for the right channel?
 

BiggAW

macrumors 68030
Jun 19, 2010
2,542
171
Connecticut
I wonder if anyone has a setup with two 24 inch cinema displays that have speakers integrated into them...

How do the speakers work? Do you run a USB cable to each monitor so you have both sets of speakers working at the same time? Can you configure the monitor on the left to just play audio for the left channel and the monitor on the right to play just audio for the right channel?
Get Dell monitors or something- they are a lot better, and a lot more flexible, and cheaper to boot. I am using a Vizio TV right now as a monitor, much better than anything Apple has. Works great with Macbook.
 

NCW

macrumors regular
May 22, 2010
143
7
a friend of mine has dual 24"s, and only gets sound from 1 monitor, so he just uses external speakers. Mind you he might not have it set up properly.
 

tmricks

macrumors newbie
Jul 27, 2010
13
0
Louisiana, United States
Get Dell monitors or something- they are a lot better, and a lot more flexible, and cheaper to boot. I am using a Vizio TV right now as a monitor, much better than anything Apple has. Works great with Macbook.
LMAO, televisions are terrible for monitors. Not enough pixels for their size.

I agree though, I would go with external speakers. A nice 2.1 system always sounds good.
 

Aravintht

macrumors 6502a
Jun 7, 2007
626
1
London, UK
with dual 24"

under system prefs>sounds>output you will see two devices, both with type "USB"

Then select one or the other.

Therefore you will hear sound from L&R on the left screen OR L&R on the right screen .

You can buy/download/acquire a program called Audio Hijack Pro - then you can modify the output so it plays on all 4 speakers. or even L on one and R on the other.

In short, yes it is possible, but it is a pain to open another program first and hijack the different sources.
 

BiggAW

macrumors 68030
Jun 19, 2010
2,542
171
Connecticut
LMAO, televisions are terrible for monitors. Not enough pixels for their size.

I agree though, I would go with external speakers. A nice 2.1 system always sounds good.
I have a 22" 1080p Vizio. If I had gotten a Dell computer monitor, it would have been 23" 1080p. Both come in sizes of about 21" and larger for 1080p. The glass you get on a TV is the same glass they would use on an equivalently sized computer monitor.

The disadvantage of a TV is it takes longer to wake up/ go to sleep, is a little bit bigger, doesn't have the same stand options, and can't be rotated to portrait mode. The advantage is you can hook other sources up to it.

And, as usual, Apple makes total garbage in the peripheral department. I can't think of a peripheral Apple makes that is worth using, other than maybe iPod headphones as a backup to a better set. The enormous trackpad, which is the successor to the hockey puck mouse, proves that Apple is utterly clueless in the peripheral area. Logitech and Microsoft both make lots of money selling mice to Mac laptop users who are fed up with crappy trackpads.

Dell is the leader in monitors, although HP, Samsung, and others also have some cool stuff.

We have standards like VGA and USB for a reason, take advantage of that.
 

donjao

macrumors member
Apr 21, 2008
80
0
I have a 22" 1080p Vizio. If I had gotten a Dell computer monitor, it would have been 23" 1080p. Both come in sizes of about 21" and larger for 1080p. The glass you get on a TV is the same glass they would use on an equivalently sized computer monitor.

The disadvantage of a TV is it takes longer to wake up/ go to sleep, is a little bit bigger, doesn't have the same stand options, and can't be rotated to portrait mode. The advantage is you can hook other sources up to it.
The main difference between TVs and Monitors is the display panel, which means the ability to output proper colors, real sharpness and so on. None of TVs can come close to output even 90% of Adobe RGB's color gamut. There's a lot more factors, like pixel pitch, pixel fill method, c/d brightness and many more that define the core differences (which you seem to be unaware of) between product types.

Dell is the leader in monitors, although HP, Samsung, and others also have some cool stuff.
What factors define the "leadership" in monitor production for you? None of Dell's monitor can come close to Eizo's monitors if you consider assembly quality and technical specification. If you're an average user and don't care about a monitor/tv unless it displays the picture for you - Dell is truly your choice. I can bet, you won't find a media agency in the wolrd that uses a TV for production,



On topic:
Technically, you can set it up anyway you like. However, on different OS it may require additional software/OS "hacking" knowledge. Since you're askin on Mac forums, then your best option is to look at "Audio MIDI Setup" app (which is in /Applications/Utilites). But I don't really think it'll let you do a lot.
 

BiggAW

macrumors 68030
Jun 19, 2010
2,542
171
Connecticut
The main difference between TVs and Monitors is the display panel, which means the ability to output proper colors, real sharpness and so on. None of TVs can come close to output even 90% of Adobe RGB's color gamut. There's a lot more factors, like pixel pitch, pixel fill method, c/d brightness and many more that define the core differences (which you seem to be unaware of) between product types.


What factors define the "leadership" in monitor production for you? None of Dell's monitor can come close to Eizo's monitors if you consider assembly quality and technical specification. If you're an average user and don't care about a monitor/tv unless it displays the picture for you - Dell is truly your choice. I can bet, you won't find a media agency in the wolrd that uses a TV for production,
TVs and monitors use the exact same glass. Why do you think 1920x1080 monitors are half the price of 1900x1200 ones, when they are 91% of the size? It's because HDTV glass has gotten a lot cheaper because of mass production.

Dell has the biggest selection of the best looking monitors at the lowest prices. Their ultrasharp and LED monitors are absolutely amazing looking.

I never said a business would buy TV's as monitors- they would buy monitors. Probably something from Dell because they are amazing monitors at amazing prices.

Users who need top of the line performance would be looking at Dell's Professional and Ultrasharp lines, which also usually have adjustable stands and portrait mode.

Of course highly specialzed users might need something different, like work where extremely precise color calibration is needed, but that's a specialty market, not normal users.
 

djdarlek

macrumors regular
Oct 10, 2003
130
0
:)

Nothing says 'newbie' more than having a rant about non-mac stuff in a forum for Mac devotees.

In addition to the logitek mouse that I use (that's miles better than Magic Mouse, does practically the same thing!) and the Ikea table (again much better than Harrods any day of the week, does practically the same thing!) I use tons of non-Mac products.
 

peskaa

macrumors 68020
Mar 13, 2008
2,104
5
London, UK
Hey, I just tell the truth. As I type on my Vizio TV with my Logitech keyboard. Connected to my Macbook.
A TV that doesn't use IPS panel for colour accuracy. Bluntly put, there is quite a difference between a TV and a high-end screen. Of course, going back to your original point, Dell do make some decent screens too.
 

BiggAW

macrumors 68030
Jun 19, 2010
2,542
171
Connecticut
A TV that doesn't use IPS panel for colour accuracy. Bluntly put, there is quite a difference between a TV and a high-end screen. Of course, going back to your original point, Dell do make some decent screens too.
IPS does look very promising from what I understand, but it's not standard yet. Even LED is not standard yet either, and that really helps on black levels.

Well, I'm not a newbie to the Mac or iPod, and I know quite well what garbage Apple's peripherals are, and how good a lot of Microsoft, Logitech, Dell, and other brands work very well with the Mac.
 

peskaa

macrumors 68020
Mar 13, 2008
2,104
5
London, UK
IPS does look very promising from what I understand, but it's not standard yet. Even LED is not standard yet either, and that really helps on black levels.

Well, I'm not a newbie to the Mac or iPod, and I know quite well what garbage Apple's peripherals are, and how good a lot of Microsoft, Logitech, Dell, and other brands work very well with the Mac.
Apple have been using IPS panels since they started making LCDs, and their cinema displays are actually very good at their price points - as long as you deal with the caveats (ie: mdp, built in speakers etc.). So in fact IPS is standard for Apple...you really need to actually know your products in detail before trash talking them.
 

BiggAW

macrumors 68030
Jun 19, 2010
2,542
171
Connecticut
Apple have been using IPS panels since they started making LCDs, and their cinema displays are actually very good at their price points - as long as you deal with the caveats (ie: mdp, built in speakers etc.). So in fact IPS is standard for Apple...you really need to actually know your products in detail before trash talking them.
Wrong. IPS was a virtually unheard of technology when it was used in the iPad. Maybe it had shown up in specialty video monitors or other applications, but the iPad was the first time it was on the consumer retail market, and there's still not much IPS stuff out there.
 

snberk103

macrumors 603
Oct 22, 2007
5,503
87
An Island in the Salish Sea
Wrong. IPS was a virtually unheard of technology when it was used in the iPad. Maybe it had shown up in specialty video monitors or other applications, but the iPad was the first time it was on the consumer retail market, and there's still not much IPS stuff out there.
That's interesting to hear. I'm using an IPS panel 23" Apple display that is 2 or 3 years old, using the same technology that they debuted with a year or 3 before that. Maybe I'm just dreaming?? :D

I think, perhaps, spending some time Googling IPS panels before posting your next comment will save us all a lot of time.

Cheers :D
 

peskaa

macrumors 68020
Mar 13, 2008
2,104
5
London, UK
Wrong. IPS was a virtually unheard of technology when it was used in the iPad. Maybe it had shown up in specialty video monitors or other applications, but the iPad was the first time it was on the consumer retail market, and there's still not much IPS stuff out there.

Seriously, what crack are you smoking?
http://www.behardware.com/articles/583-1/test-apple-cinema-display-20.html
Article from 2005. Note the phrase on the first page "This is quite common for this type of panel, an IPS designed by LG-Philips. The black isn’t very deep."

Oh look. IPS, in 2005! Apple have been using IPS panels in their screens for years and years (off the top of my head, the acrylic-style ACDs came out in 2003/2004) and also in the iMacs (with the sole exception being the first generation 20" Alu iMacs that had TN panels that everybody bitched about).

Do some research before going off on one. The iPad is the first use of an IPS panel in the tablet form factor, but thats about it. IPS screen technology has been around in the market for ages.
 

RubbishBBspeed

macrumors regular
Aug 1, 2009
231
0
with dual 24"

under system prefs>sounds>output you will see two devices, both with type "USB"

Then select one or the other.

Therefore you will hear sound from L&R on the left screen OR L&R on the right screen .

You can buy/download/acquire a program called Audio Hijack Pro - then you can modify the output so it plays on all 4 speakers. or even L on one and R on the other.

In short, yes it is possible, but it is a pain to open another program first and hijack the different sources.
So if you can use the left built in speaker on the lefthand side screen and the right built in speaker on the righthand side screen. Is there an option to use the two disused speakers as centre speakers in then two external speakers as rear speakers to create a 5:1 surround sound system.

Personally I'd rather not have the built-in speakers at all, I've a nice set of yamaha hs50 monitor's sitting on my desk and apart from being wonderful for listening to near field music, they get a respectful nod from some of the music aficionados.
 

jjahshik32

macrumors 603
Sep 4, 2006
5,268
1
Wrong. IPS was a virtually unheard of technology when it was used in the iPad. Maybe it had shown up in specialty video monitors or other applications, but the iPad was the first time it was on the consumer retail market, and there's still not much IPS stuff out there.
What are you talking about?? Unheard of technology until it was used in the iPad?? Maybe for you but I've been using IPS displays and or wanting one for the last 8 years.

Nothing matches the quality of the IPS displays especially the 24" LED Cinema Displays. I'm debating on whether to buy the 24" or wait for the 27" as both are H-IPS displays with LED backlighting.

I've been through many monitors from Dell, HP, Acer, Samsung (xl2370 is an excellent LED backlit monitor especially for a TN panel) but none of them compares in quality, colors, viewing angle and vividness to the 24" and 27" LED Cinema Displays.
 

BiggAW

macrumors 68030
Jun 19, 2010
2,542
171
Connecticut
What are you talking about?? Unheard of technology until it was used in the iPad?? Maybe for you but I've been using IPS displays and or wanting one for the last 8 years.

Nothing matches the quality of the IPS displays especially the 24" LED Cinema Displays. I'm debating on whether to buy the 24" or wait for the 27" as both are H-IPS displays with LED backlighting.

I've been through many monitors from Dell, HP, Acer, Samsung (xl2370 is an excellent LED backlit monitor) but none of them compares in quality and vividness to the 24" and 27" LED Cinema Displays.
I googled it, and I guess there were a few models here and there that floated around, still a specialty product at that.

Apple monitors are absolute junk. mini display port only? WTF? Dell monitors have at a minimum, DVI-D and VGA. The 30" Dell has VGA, DVI-D with HDCP, HDMI, S-Video, Component, Composite and DisplayPort. Ok, you don't want to drive a 30" monitor with composite or even VGA, but every possible port you would ever want to use is there.

Also, Dell gets new glass faster than Apple, since they sell such a high volume, are usually cheaper, and have better/ more flexible stands.

The Dell 30" is $100 less than the Apple equivalent and has many more inputs.

Apple's 24" is a whopping $800, while Dell's is $600, and Lenovo's is $400. While they aren't LED, the Lenovo does manage to meet EPEAT gold.
 

snberk103

macrumors 603
Oct 22, 2007
5,503
87
An Island in the Salish Sea
I googled it, and I guess there were a few models here and there that floated around, still a specialty product at that.
Not speciality. They were used by any high-end monitor. There were junk panels, mid-range panels, and high-end panels. IPS panels are generally found in the mid to high range. I am speaking from a photographer's point of view where viewing angle and colour calibration are important. For the less serious gaming segment, speed of the panel is more important. I mean, does it really matter if gore in a game is 2 points less colour accurate.
Apple monitors are absolute junk.
Generalize much? Apple's monitor's are good mid-range monitor, currently. Not the best, and not the worst. There is some talk about the glossy panels being hard for photographers. But they are supposedly pretty good for watching a movie. The colours are supposedly stunning.
mini display port only? WTF? Dell monitors have at a minimum, DVI-D and VGA. The 30" Dell has VGA, DVI-D with HDCP, HDMI, S-Video, Component, Composite and DisplayPort. Ok, you don't want to drive a 30" monitor with composite or even VGA, but every possible port you would ever want to use is there.
Let's see.... Apple makes monitors to fit Apple's computers. Do they connect to Apple's computers? Oh, my look at that .... they do!! :rolleyes: Why would someone then want to pay for connectors they don't need? :)
...
Apple's 24" is a whopping $800, while Dell's is $600, and Lenovo's is $400. While they aren't LED, the Lenovo does manage to meet EPEAT gold.
Can't compare those. The LED is an important part of the monitor, and not just for energy consumption. The non-LED backlights tend to fade and change colour over time. Again, gamers don't care - their needs are not as strict as anyone doing colour correct work.

One of the big problems I've read about the Dell monitors is that the model and manufacturer of the panel changes from month to month, depending on which factory can meet the price points. So, their consumer stuff may be nice individually - you can't count on any consistency from one monitor to the next - despite being sold as the same model.
 

BiggAW

macrumors 68030
Jun 19, 2010
2,542
171
Connecticut
Not speciality. They were used by any high-end monitor. There were junk panels, mid-range panels, and high-end panels. IPS panels are generally found in the mid to high range. I am speaking from a photographer's point of view where viewing angle and colour calibration are important. For the less serious gaming segment, speed of the panel is more important. I mean, does it really matter if gore in a game is 2 points less colour accurate.

Generalize much? Apple's monitor's are good mid-range monitor, currently. Not the best, and not the worst. There is some talk about the glossy panels being hard for photographers. But they are supposedly pretty good for watching a movie. The colours are supposedly stunning.

Let's see.... Apple makes monitors to fit Apple's computers. Do they connect to Apple's computers? Oh, my look at that .... they do!! :rolleyes: Why would someone then want to pay for connectors they don't need? :)


Can't compare those. The LED is an important part of the monitor, and not just for energy consumption. The non-LED backlights tend to fade and change colour over time. Again, gamers don't care - their needs are not as strict as anyone doing colour correct work.

One of the big problems I've read about the Dell monitors is that the model and manufacturer of the panel changes from month to month, depending on which factory can meet the price points. So, their consumer stuff may be nice individually - you can't count on any consistency from one monitor to the next - despite being sold as the same model.
Apple's monitors are junk because they are overpriced, and they can't connect to many Macs and most PCs. Heck, my Mac can't drive those, since it has mini-DVI which outputs through a VGA adapter. VGA can't drive a 27", but up to 24", VGA is just fine.

My Mac laptops over the past 6 years have driven every type of monitor around, from a 14" Dell to Philips, Sony, and Vizio TV's and monitors, made from 1993 to 2010. Why shouldn't a monitor be able to take input from any computer that has a VGA port? I understand monitors that are 27 or 30 inches only have DL-DVI and DP, since VGA can't drive them at native resolution, but Apple only offers MDP, and not DL-DVI, and their 24" monitor doesn't offer VGA or DVI.

Standards were created for a reason- you can mix and match hardware from one type of computer to another- and Apple should comply with the standards and price their products in line with the competition, like Dell. If they don't only a few suckers out there will buy the junk.

Apple computers are good computers, but I haven't seen a single peripheral in the past 6 years come out of that company that is both usable and worth what it's priced at.

We also don't live in a Mac world- we live in a Windows world, and hardware has got to work in that world. Hardware that only works with a Mac is pretty worthless. While I am a staunch supporter of Mac OSX, just like any Mac user who is also a computer enthusiast, I have a couple of Windows machines around too.
 

snberk103

macrumors 603
Oct 22, 2007
5,503
87
An Island in the Salish Sea
Apple's monitors are junk because they are overpriced, and they can't connect to many Macs and most PCs.
You are still over generalizing. Let me rephrase what you are saying. "I don't like the monitors, because they don't have the features I need. And because I find them overpriced I hereby declare them junk, and by implication I declare that anyone who finds that the monitors suit their needs should return to the village missing their village idiot."

So who died and made you Emperor of Good Value and Good Taste?

...
... Apple should ... price their products in line with the competition, like Dell. If they don't only a few suckers out there will buy the junk.
There you go with your generalizations again. Good Lord I wish I had a product to sell at the margins Apple products can demand. If you can sell your product, and sell a lot of it, at a higher price than your competition.... then I would call that successful. And I'm sure with your MBA and access to Apple's competitive data that you know exactly how many monitors they sell. :rolleyes:
Apple computers are good computers, but I haven't seen a single peripheral in the past 6 years come out of that company that is both usable and worth what it's priced at.
There you go again.... Do you ever consider, just once, allowing that what you are saying is opinion? Perhaps a little conjecture and educated guesses? Any product is worth what people will actually pay for it. Enough people pay for the peripherals that - it's worth what it's priced at - for those people. If you think it's overpriced, don't buy it. Terribly simple, really.
We also don't live in a Mac world- we live in a Windows world, and hardware has got to work in that world.
Why? Do you think the bright lights at Apple haven't thought of that? Apple sells enough monitors, for Apple's needs, just the way the are. They just don't apparently sell enough units to suit your needs. If you were a stock holder, you would actually have the right to question Apple on this decision. Even if you were a stock holder, all you are doing here is messing up a perfectly fine discussion on the speakers in the Apple displays.
Hardware that only works with a Mac is pretty worthless. While I am a staunch supporter of Mac OSX, just like any Mac user who is also a computer enthusiast, I have a couple of Windows machines around too.
I don't have any Windows computers around. The last Windows I played on was XP as a virtual machine inside OS X. And that only because my wife needed XP as a virtual machine on her MBP for work, and so I had it so I could answer the occasional question.
 

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