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macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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16,089


Epic Games today said that it has asked Apple to reinstate its Fortnite developer account because it intends to release Fortnite in South Korea.

fortnite-apple-logo-south-korea-feature-1.jpg

South Korea in late August passed a bill that bans Apple from requiring developers to use its in-app purchase system. The bill forces Apple (and Google) to let developers use third-party payment methods to make purchases.

Epic Games now says that it intends to release Fornite in Korea and offer both Epic payment and Apple payment options side-by-side "in compliance with the new Korean law."


Fortnite has been unavailable on iOS devices since Apple pulled the app in August 2020. Apple removed the app from the App Store after Epic Games added a direct payment option that skirted Apple's in-app purchase requirements, and since then, the two have been embroiled in a bitter legal battle.

Epic Games attempted to get a judge to require Apple to allow Fortnite on the App Store while the lawsuit played out, but the judge refused because the situation that caused Fortnite to be banned was of Epic Games' own making.

When South Korea passed its updated Telecommunications Business Act banning Apple from requiring in-app purchases, Apple said that it would put users at risk of fraud and undermine privacy protections.
The Telecommunications Business Act will put users who purchase digital goods from other sources at risk of fraud, undermine their privacy protections, make it difficult to manage their purchases, and features like "Ask to Buy" and Parental Controls will become less effective. We believe user trust in App Store purchases will decrease as a result of this legislation -- leading to fewer opportunities for the over 482,000 registered developers in Korea who have earned more than KRW8.55 trillion to date with Apple.
Apple and Epic Games faced off in a trial that took place earlier this year, and we are still awaiting a final ruling from the judge overseeing the case. Epic Games argued that iOS should be opened up to competing app stores, but it is unlikely that Apple will be required to implement such a drastic change.

Update: In a statement to MacRumors, Apple said there is no basis for the reinstatement of the Epic Games developer account.
As we've said all along, we would welcome Epic’s return to the App Store if they agree to play by the same rules as everyone else. Epic has admitted to breach of contract and as of now, there’s no legitimate basis for the reinstatement of their developer account.
Apple says that to be added back to the App Store, Epic Games would need to comply with all of Apple's App Store review guidelines, which the company has thus far declined to do.

Apple also points out that the legislation in South Korea is has not yet gone into effect and even if it had, Apple would have no obligation to reinstate a developer account that was terminated prior to when it became law.

Article Link: Epic Games Asks Apple to Restore Fortnite in South Korea Following Ban on In-App Purchase Requirement [Update]
 
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B-Mc-C

macrumors member
Jan 12, 2017
53
308
Irvine, California
They’re using Apple’s intellectual property (thousands of APIs) to build their app. These are not open source to my knowledge and are likely licensed to them under Apple’s terms. Apple spends a boatload of money developing all of these “building blocks.” If they decide they don’t want someone using their licensed tools/software, especially someone who is not paying for it, then so be it. Just my opinion.
 
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KanosWRX

macrumors 6502
Jul 14, 2008
370
295
I mean at this point its Apple's store they can allow whoever the hell they want, even if it means they have to open up the payment system. I say screw them, they caused this mess keep them out... If people don't like it they can buy Android phones I guess or some Chinese brand that will spy on them. I mean let the people decide I say.
 
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BWhaler

macrumors 68040
Jan 8, 2003
3,338
4,713
They’re using Apple’s intellectual property (thousands of APIs) to build their app. These are not open source to my knowledge and are likely licensed to them under Apple’s terms. Apple spends a boatload of money developing all of these “building blocks.” If they decide they don’t want someone using their licensed tools/software, especially someone who is not paying for it, then so be it. Just my opinion.

agreed. Make a web app if they want.
 
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Meñito

macrumors member
Jul 8, 2015
46
51
They’re using Apple’s intellectual property (thousands of APIs) to build their app. These are not open source to my knowledge and are likely licensed to them under Apple’s terms. Apple spends a boatload of money developing all of these “building blocks.” If they decide they don’t want someone using their licensed tools/software, especially someone who is not paying for it, then so be it. Just my opinion.
Thousands of API's that the developer pays when he renews his annual membership, that the user of the device pays when he buys an iPhone or any other Apple device. Everything else is Apple's abuse of its users and developers.
 
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Joe_

macrumors member
Oct 16, 2020
41
311
United States
While I HATE Epic Games with a burning passion for brainwashing people and being very hypocritical, I think alternative payments should be a option if it’s not a developer trying to scam a user. Good, just don’t do Sideloading on iOS and I’ll be completely fine with whatever happens from here on out.
 
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amartinez1660

macrumors 65816
Sep 22, 2014
1,055
944
Hope they’re never allowed on the App Store again.
I get the sentiment (also let’s get ready for the Epic believers downvotes) but at this point it’s the law… basically Apple can’t use the “Epic didn’t follow the -no third party payments advertisement- guidelines” anymore as that guideline would be illegal now.

In South Korea looks like Epic has won.

Myself I get conflicted, Epic indeed does great things, I have been watching their latest advancements (Nanite and Lumen), the engineers themselves explaining it and honesty at the forefront pointing out all the drawbacks (half of the presentation is that: caveats, constraints and things to watch out for).
But at the same time these money grab sneaky throws… what the heck.
 
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Michael Scrip

macrumors 604
Mar 4, 2011
6,800
9,227
NC
I never understood why Epic didn't do what Amazon did long ago.

Amazon didn't want to be charged 30% on every Kindle ebook they sold... so they just stopped it altogether. And people had to go to Amazon's website to buy Kindle ebooks.

Epic could have done something similar. Even though they couldn't (then) have a link to a website in the app... I'm pretty sure gamers would have figured it out.

You need an Epic Games account to play Fortnite anyway, right? So you already have a login and password to Epic's website and store.

That seems like a better option than suing the two major mobile platforms.
 
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javanate

macrumors regular
May 13, 2005
130
478
Thousands of API's that the developer pays when he renews his annual membership, that the user of the device pays when he buys an iPhone or any other Apple device. Everything else is Apple's abuse of its users and developers.
Sounds like you're making that up. I know of no instance in which Apple has detailed their budget so specifically so you would have any basis to make that remark.
 
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Shirasaki

macrumors G4
May 16, 2015
11,706
5,602
Start to wonder did epic actually read about the legislation requirement or South Korea is actually banning monopoly payment option on platforms universally?
I don’t play fortnite and prolly never will, but Idk if banning them is the right call.
Also, what‘s left for epic on Mac? Unreal Engine? Or something else entirely?

(safari is bad)
 
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Shirasaki

macrumors G4
May 16, 2015
11,706
5,602
I never understood why Epic didn't do what Amazon did long ago.

Amazon didn't want to be charged 30% on every Kindle ebook they sold... so they just stopped it altogether. And people had to go to Amazon's website to buy Kindle ebooks.

Epic could have done something similar. Even though they couldn't (then) have a link to a website in the app... I'm pretty sure gamers would have figured it out.

You need an Epic Games account to play Fortnite anyway, right? So you already have a login and password to Epic's website and store.

That seems like a better option than suing the two major mobile platforms.
Fortnite is a game, and Amazon app is a “reader“ app. They are completely different things, so “reader” rule won’t apply, cause game is not a “reader”.
 
Comment

Joe_

macrumors member
Oct 16, 2020
41
311
United States
Thousands of API's that the developer pays when he renews his annual membership, that the user of the device pays when he buys an iPhone or any other Apple device. Everything else is Apple's abuse of its users and developers.
“Apple’s abuse of its developers” — Did they drag them and beat them with a baseball bat or something? Holy **** I wonder what happened.
 
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Cosmosent

macrumors 68000
Apr 20, 2016
1,977
2,274
La Jolla, CA
The timing of this will probably determine Apple's move.

Today is the 9th, & Apple's BIG event is on the 14th.

Hard to say what they think is their best course of action.

IMO, Epic clearly stepped-out of bounds.

But, Apple clearly also has had too much control of it ALL, & that's about to change !

Antitrust legislation is making its way thru Congress, & Tim Cook knows that !

And NOT just here in the States !

Apple's recent App Store changes impressed few, & Tim Cook knows that also !

NOT sure they'll accommodate Epic though.

Egos, NOT logic OR even common sense, drive most decisions in BIG companies.
 
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killramos

macrumors member
May 8, 2008
37
89
I never understood why Epic didn't do what Amazon did long ago.

Amazon didn't want to be charged 30% on every Kindle ebook they sold... so they just stopped it altogether. And people had to go to Amazon's website to buy Kindle ebooks.

Epic could have done something similar. Even though they couldn't (then) have a link to a website in the app... I'm pretty sure gamers would have figured it out.

You need an Epic Games account to play Fortnite anyway, right? So you already have a login and password to Epic's website and store.

That seems like a better option than suing the two major mobile platforms.

epics business model relies on people making stupid purchasing decisions for instant gratification in the moment

people having a sober second thought before buying is contrary to their goals
 
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Michael Scrip

macrumors 604
Mar 4, 2011
6,800
9,227
NC
Fortnite is a game, and Amazon app is a “reader“ app. They are completely different things, so “reader” rule won’t apply, cause game is not a “reader”.

Ah good point.

But couldn't I buy VBucks elsewhere and have them show up in the iOS app?

Forgive me as I've only played Fortnite on the PC. And not very much. :)

I just know that you can buy VBucks giftcards at the freakin' grocery store... so you can obviously buy VBucks in places other than in the app. Clearly Apple's IAP isn't the only way to buy this digital currency.

That's why I was wondering why Epic didn't just let people buy VBucks from their own website or store or whatever.

fortnite-gift-cards-700.jpg
 
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