FBI Successfully Unlocks iPhone 11 Pro in Ohio, Casting Doubt on Claims it Needs Apple's Help in Florida Mass Shooter Case

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New questions have been raised about the FBI's latest request that Apple break its iPhone encryption, after Forbes uncovered a search warrant strongly indicating that federal agents already have tools that can access data on Apple's latest iPhone models.


The report says that FBI investigators in Ohio recently used the GrayKey hardware box to unlock an iPhone 11 Pro Max. The iPhone belonged to Baris Ali Koch, who was accused of helping his convicted brother flee the country by providing him with his own ID documents and lying to the police. He has now entered a plea agreement and is awaiting sentencing.

Koch's lawyer confirmed to Forbes that the iPhone was locked with a passcode when it got in the hands of the FBI and that the code was never revealed to law enforcement, nor was the defendant forced to use his face to unlock the phone via Face ID.

Created by a company named Grayshift, GrayKey is a portable gray box that has previously been used by law enforcement to crack the passcode on iPhones. Complete details on how the latest GrayKey works are not known, although Apple continually works to fix the kinds of exploits used by such devices.

Ohio FBI search warrant

Forbes has previously revealed a GrayKey brochure that showed it worked on older devices, and the two iPhones acquired by the FBI in the most recent Pensacola case are an iPhone 5 and an iPhone 7, which strongly suggests that investigators are already capable of unlocking them.

President Donald Trump and Attorney General William Barr have also weighed in on the latest iPhone encryption stalemate between Apple and the FBI, with both urging the tech giant to assist in unlocking the iPhones used by the Pensacola shooter.

Justice department officials claim to need access to the iPhones to see messages from encrypted apps like Signal or WhatsApp to find out if the shooter discussed his plans or had help. Apple says it has already provided law enforcement officials with information from the shooter's iCloud account, which amounts to all the data in its possession.

Statements by Apple suggest it is gearing up for a battle similar to the one it faced in 2016 in the San Bernardino shooter case, indicating the company has no plans to create a backdoor in its software, regardless of the U.S. government's motives. Apple has previously said that doing so would create "new and dangerous weaknesses" and that weakening security "makes no sense."

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Political News forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

Article Link: FBI Successfully Unlocks iPhone 11 Pro in Ohio, Casting Doubt on Claims it Needs Apple's Help in Florida Mass Shooter Case
 
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centauratlas

macrumors 65816
Jan 29, 2003
1,162
1,659
Florida
I don't trust the FBI (or other three or more letter agencies) to tell the truth no matter which party is (in theory) in charge of them. They have gone rogue and lie with impunity in order to manipulate.

A useful link:

If the FBI can do it, so can anyone else with access to your phone.
 

dumastudetto

macrumors 68040
Aug 28, 2013
3,286
3,931
This is why you should keep the USB Accessories settings off.
I'm sure they have already found ways in even with that option left toggled off. Given it defaults off, substantially more noise would have been made about it if it was causing problems investigating serious crime and national security issues.

We'll know when there's a real problem because tough laws will be driven through to force Apple to comply with orders to weaken security, or face ruinous financial penalties.

That said, I think it's advisable to keep the option toggled off to help lock out other bad actors.
 
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diipii

macrumors 6502a
Dec 6, 2012
616
552
UK
Or Apple helped but don't want you to know.
Or, what the hell have people got on their phones that is so precious hence all the handbag clutching that happens every time some low life is investigated.
Grow up and help the powers of law and order and stop creating self obsessed dramas at every opportunity.
 

Tymmz

macrumors 65816
Jan 6, 2005
1,450
275
Lock down? You mean create an unhackable, unbreakable operating system? For the first time in history? Hope away, pal.
sorry, the wording wasn't very clear. I mean third parties won't be able to gain unauthorised access.
 

Jim Lahey

macrumors 6502a
Apr 8, 2014
891
1,594
Sunnyvale
Or Apple helped but don't want you to know.
Or, what the hell have people got on their phones that is so precious hence all the handbag clutching that happens every time some low life is investigated.
Grow up and help the powers of law and order and stop creating self obsessed dramas at every opportunity.
"I don't think it's anybody's business what I own."

So, according to your signature, the number and type of devices you own is a private matter, but you’d be happy turning them over to me unlocked for a couple of hours each because you have nothing to hide.

lol.
 
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nihil0

macrumors 6502
May 19, 2016
314
202
how can they break it - even if I want to listen the music via cable in my car I need to unlock my phone with Face ID to confirm USB connection
 
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Mr.Bigglesworth

macrumors regular
Sep 9, 2016
141
199
A lot of people want Apple to tighten up security.

okay. Let some catastrophe happen to you or your family done by some POS dirt bag and the answer to said calamity is sitting inside their iPhone. You would be rioting for Apple to give the fbi a backdoor access to that phone, so stop it. It’s not a problem because it’s not happening to you.
 
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akbarali.ch

macrumors 6502a
May 4, 2011
555
314
Mumbai (India)
Or Apple helped but don't want you to know.
Or, what the hell have people got on their phones that is so precious hence all the handbag clutching that happens every time some low life is investigated.
Grow up and help the powers of law and order and stop creating self obsessed dramas at every opportunity.
I don't have anything on my phone that I'll be worried about law enforcement getting their hands on. But obviously it has my financial info, log/pass of several websites, email account, which I don't want it to be accessible by anyone out there. I mean, it can wreck the entire family down in minutes if someone wants to harm.

People who support that Apple should build tools to unlock or help them to unlock or create a back-door. Are not thinking about the potential damage it can do for the rest of the population.

In the end, people (the good and bad) would just end up not put any such info on the phone at all.
 

Jim Lahey

macrumors 6502a
Apr 8, 2014
891
1,594
Sunnyvale
A lot of people want Apple to tighten up security.

okay. Let some catastrophe happen to you or your family done by some POS dirt bag and the answer to said calamity is sitting inside their iPhone. You would be rioting for Apple to give the fbi a backdoor access to that phone, so stop it. It’s not a problem because it’s not happening to you.
This might be why victims don’t get to write laws or pass sentencing on those that break them. Just a guess.
 
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Kabeyun

macrumors 68020
Mar 27, 2004
2,435
4,459
Eastern USA
sorry, the wording wasn't very clear. I mean third parties won't be able to gain unauthorised access.
Same thing, right? If you’re a rule-following third party, you already can’t gain unauthorized access to an iPhone. If you’re not, then you’re talking about an unhackable, unbreakable operating system.
 

SpeedyTheSnail

macrumors regular
Sep 22, 2018
201
455
Caprica
Or Apple helped but don't want you to know.
Or, what the hell have people got on their phones that is so precious hence all the handbag clutching that happens every time some low life is investigated.
Grow up and help the powers of law and order and stop creating self obsessed dramas at every opportunity.
Good thing not everybody is as willing to give their freedoms up as you are.

We have an expectation of privacy in the United States from the government, when we give up our freedoms we will end up in a tyrannical state.

But I bet you believe that the government is infallible and the information would never be used against you.
 

GalileoSeven

macrumors regular
Jan 3, 2015
241
362
A lot of people want Apple to tighten up security.

okay. Let some catastrophe happen to you or your family done by some POS dirt bag and the answer to said calamity is sitting inside their iPhone. You would be rioting for Apple to give the fbi a backdoor access to that phone, so stop it. It’s not a problem because it’s not happening to you.
That's a nice strawman argument you have there :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:
 
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Grey Area

macrumors regular
Jan 14, 2008
221
513
A lot of people want Apple to tighten up security.

okay. Let some catastrophe happen to you or your family done by some POS dirt bag and the answer to said calamity is sitting inside their iPhone. You would be rioting for Apple to give the fbi a backdoor access to that phone, so stop it. It’s not a problem because it’s not happening to you.
1) You have no clue how those pro-security people would react in your scenario. Calling them hypocrites for a reaction that you made up and projected onto them is rather dubious.

2) It is very easy to turn your scenario around. Some POS dirtbag uses the backdoor to access the phones of you or your family members, stealing money, or stealing private pictures to blackmail your loved ones, committing identity theft in order to do all sorts of shenanigans in your name... It would be easy to say, "You would be rioting for Apple to tighten security, you hypocrite!" Maybe you wouldn't, but that's about as believable as your scenario.
 
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SpeedyTheSnail

macrumors regular
Sep 22, 2018
201
455
Caprica
A lot of people want Apple to tighten up security.

okay. Let some catastrophe happen to you or your family done by some POS dirt bag and the answer to said calamity is sitting inside their iPhone. You would be rioting for Apple to give the fbi a backdoor access to that phone, so stop it. It’s not a problem because it’s not happening to you.
I wouldn't because I'm not retarded.

Just because people misuse a device for bad or evil purposes doesn't mean that everybody should give up security or privacy.

I bet you'd be one of the first people complaining when a backdoor put in for government got hacked and private information about you was leaked out.

I see lots of over-opinionated pro-government having access to everything in your life post by people who clearly have no understanding of technology and [if you are a citizen of the United States] the reason we have rights defined in the constitution.
 
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hortod1

macrumors 6502
Jan 26, 2009
266
416
I’d imagine Apple has more than one of these GreyKey’s lying around the office. Pretty skeptical the FBI could crack an iPhone before Apple could fix it. Pro hackers, maybe. But not the Feds with an off-the-shelf plug-and-play device.
 
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