Become a MacRumors Supporter for $25/year with no ads, private forums, and more!

Gold Version of iPhone 12 Pro Apparently Has a More Fingerprint Resistant Stainless Steel Frame

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
50,473
11,862


iPhone 12 Pro reviews hit the web today, and one of the more interesting tidbits came from TechCrunch's Matthew Panzarino, who revealed that the Gold version of the device apparently has a more fingerprint resistant coating applied to the stainless steel frame.


From his review:
Most of the iPhone 12 Pro finishes still use a physical vapor deposition process for edge coating. But the new gold (which I do not have in person but looks great) uses a special high-power, impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) process that lays down the coating in a super dense pattern, allowing it to be tough and super bright with a molecular structure that mimics the stainless steel underneath — making it more durable than "standard" PVD. One side effect is that it's easier to wipe clean and takes on less fingerprints, something that my blue model was, uh, definitely prone to.
Panzarino said the new coating is also "more durable" than the one applied to other iPhone 12 Pro finishes, suggesting that the Gold version of the device could be at least slightly less susceptible to scratches, nicks, or other wear and tear.

While this information presumably comes from Apple, it appears that all reviewers were provided with the Pacific Blue version of the iPhone 12 Pro, so we'll have to wait and see exactly how much more durable and fingerprint resistant the Gold version proves to be. The device will begin arriving to customers starting this Friday.

We've rounded up iPhone 12 reviews, iPhone 12 Pro reviews, and unboxing videos of both devices ahead of Friday's launch.

Article Link: Gold Version of iPhone 12 Pro Apparently Has a More Fingerprint Resistant Stainless Steel Frame
 

Relentless Power

macrumors Nehalem
Jul 12, 2016
34,681
36,124
And what are the negatives of using this process?

PVD if it had a reaction to anything, it might cause a separation or ‘tarnish-like appearance‘ if it comes in contact with certain types of fluids/cleaning solutions. The gold stainless Apple Watch uses PVD, [a few members posted their experiences with with tarnishing due to the PVD, but it was more of a rarity.]
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.