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GanleyGanley

macrumors newbie
Original poster
May 10, 2014
9
35
I saw the new M1 MacBook Pros - "16" and 14" tonight. The body is squared off and thicker than my 2013 MBP. WHAT??? And it feels cheap, not like the former Airplane Grade aluminum. You knock on it and it feels hollow-ish. And the bottom feet are harder than previous models, almost like a cell phone case that is hard plastic and sort of hits the desk too hard. I am pretty disappointed. Why, Apple, Why? I waited years to upgrade. Almost tempted to get a deal on an older one now.
 

tmoerel

macrumors 6502a
Jan 24, 2008
554
610
I saw the new M1 MacBook Pros - "16" and 14" tonight. The body is squared off and thicker than my 2013 MBP. WHAT??? And it feels cheap, not like the former Airplane Grade aluminum. You knock on it and it feels hollow-ish. And the bottom feet are harder than previous models, almost like a cell phone case that is hard plastic and sort of hits the desk too hard. I am pretty disappointed. Why, Apple, Why? I waited years to upgrade. Almost tempted to get a deal on an older one now.
I understand you don't like the new design. But this was not designed to be liked but to be and ultra efficient case for the new M1 Pro and Max SOCs:

- Squared of body has more internal volume for better cooling, bigger batteries and better speakers
- More internal volume means the case can sound a bit hollow
- Feet are harder plastic as the old feet used to wear and even slowly rot away

So you might not like it but it is all done for the sake of efficiency and longevity. Now if the design is still a problem for you, even knowing it is a big improvement, then by all means get an older, thermally compromised, space heater macbook pro. Good luck!
 

Paratriplel

macrumors regular
Oct 1, 2011
230
59
Try to look at ironically and I’m sure you’ll feel slightly better about it.
But seriously either you need it and the performance it comes with. I personally are just so happy about finally getting a fast computer that will be quiet, they could have made it look completely like a toy and I’d still have bought it but being used to the 15” MBP’s I felt the 14” looked a bit awkward with its slim width which was like 2% of the reason I decided to go with a 16” over the 14” after debating it for a month after the Unleash event but I’d not have let looks decide wether I’d get it or not. The 13” is still available and has a Apple Silicon-chip as well and is probably a fantastic computer as well if you feel you’re being too off put by the looks of the new ones.
 

smirking

macrumors 68040
Aug 31, 2003
3,102
2,740
Silicon Valley
The body is squared off and thicker than my 2013 MBP. WHAT??? And it feels cheap, not like the former Airplane Grade aluminum.

Mine is on order and I haven't visited an Apple Store in a while so I have no idea as to what you're referring to, but perhaps that old Unibody and rMBP feel might have come at the cost of extra weight. If so, I'd gladly accept the tradeoff of a bit of weight savings.

Also to be considered is that they may have done some things for acoustics. If it the audio quality is as amazing as people say it is, it's not all because of the speakers.
 
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Vermifuge

macrumors 68020
Mar 7, 2009
2,034
1,569
It's cause Jony Ive got canned so now they're not focused as much on design and more on performance (which personally I have no qualms with whatsoever). I'd love to get one but my 2019 Pro cost too much to upgrade this soon. Maybe next year...
 

scottrichardson

macrumors 6502a
Jul 10, 2007
521
32
Ulladulla, NSW Australia
Actually given the thermal design for these SOC’s, and given they are generally more efficient than the previous Intel+GPU configs, I’m surprised Apple went with a thicker design. I’m sure over time they will work on getting the enclosure more sleek without compromising thermals.

Anyone know what the average power draw/heat output was of the outgoing core i9 model?
 
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tmoerel

macrumors 6502a
Jan 24, 2008
554
610
Actually given the thermal design for these SOC’s, and given they are generally more efficient than the previous Intel+GPU configs, I’m surprised Apple went with a thicker design. I’m sure over time they will work on getting the enclosure more sleek without compromising thermals.

Anyone know what the average power draw/heat output was of the outgoing core i9 model?
Apple decided to release very powerful SOCs that are beating even many desktop systems. So the cooling is needed!!
It looks like they wanted to make a dent in the universe with these machines instead of just being a small blip on the speed radar.
 

leman

macrumors P6
Oct 14, 2008
15,148
11,739
I have the impression that Apple design language has been driven by a certain "nostalgia" recently, and that the new Apple Silicon Macs are designed to evoke the memories of Apple's "golden age" and recommitment to the good old times and values. It's more of a PR decision than a technical necessity. Colorful new iMacs, which directly derive from the iconic first iMac models, and now sturdy-looking square MBPs that are based on the same design as the 2006 unibody models, which were widely regarded to be "the most pro laptops Apple ever made" (even if this memory is highly subjective).

There should be little doubt that the 2016 tapered chassis would have more than enough cooling power to deal with the M1 Pro and M1 Max - the 16" Intel chassis can already dissipate close to 80W without any issues which is enough for even more demanding M1 Max workloads. Tapered design probably had to go because of HDMI — can't fit that thick port on a tapered edge. The rest is just Apple making a statement: hey look, we are not "form over function" (whatever that means). Of course, much of it is an optical illusion. These new machines are still thinner than the original retina laptops.

Personally, I think Apple went a bit overboard, but it seems that the changes were well received. I especially regret the loss of a USB port — while it is nice to have an integrated multiport hub, there are cases where three ports are simply not enough. But it's cheaper for Apple (they can save on PCI-e lanes and thunderbolt controllers), and apparently people think that having an integrated hub means more "function" than having a universal port. I would prefer to have both if I am honest.
 
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Vermifuge

macrumors 68020
Mar 7, 2009
2,034
1,569
I especially regret the loss of a USB port — while it is nice to have an integrated multiport hub, there are cases where three ports are simply not enough. But it's cheaper for Apple (they can save on PCI-e lanes and thunderbolt controllers), and apparently people think that having an integrated hub means more "function" than having a universal port. I would prefer to have both if I am honest.
The new M1 Pro and Max MBP have three thunderbolt buses each capable of 40Gb/s according to the system information. A total of 120 GB/s split over 3 ports. On the Intel based MBPs there are only two TB controllers on the 4 port models. Ports on each side of the old MacBools share bandwidth from each of the two controllers. A total of 80 GB/s split over 4 ports. You are in fact gaining 40GB/s of bandwidth because they don't share controllers between each of the three TB ports.
 

leman

macrumors P6
Oct 14, 2008
15,148
11,739
The new M1 Pro and Max MBP have three thunderbolt buses each capable of 40Gb/s according to the system information. A total of 120 GB/s split over 3 ports. On the Intel based MBPs there are only two TB controllers on the 4 port models. Ports on each side of the old MacBools share bandwidth from each of the two controllers. A total of 80 GB/s split over 4 ports. You are in fact gaining 40GB/s of bandwidth because they don't share controllers between each of the three TB ports.

Sure, and I think it's great that Apple delivered a high-end Thunderbolt implementation (actually, the security features of their approach are much more important in practice than the additional bandwidth). But it's still three ports. In my office, I am using a USB port to connect my monitor + peripherals + power, one USB port to connect to ethernet and one USB port to connect a backup drive. On the older models, this still left me with a high-speed USB port that I could use for an additional HDD or Flashdrive for exchanging data. On the new models, I am out of ports entirely and I will need to get an additional hub for my office setup. It's a minor thing, but it does illustrate that the solution is not without drawbacks.
 
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Philllllip

macrumors regular
Nov 3, 2014
114
124
I actually think its totally beautiful both the 14 and 16. Top and bottom look great. I love the etched out MacBook Pro wording on the bottom. Yes my i9 16 looks sleeker but I prefer the new chunky look. Only thing i personally would of kept is the 4 usbc ports and the MagSafe but no other ports are needed for me anyways :)
 

DMG35

Contributor
May 27, 2021
639
1,252
I get you might now like the design. But how does a lapto that is made from the same material as the one you are currently using feel cheap? If anyting it feels more premium than the tapered off previous models.
 
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