How many MPGs do you get?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Sdashiki, Apr 16, 2007.

?

How many miles per gallon does your vehicle get?

  1. 10-19

    30 vote(s)
    22.2%
  2. 20-29

    52 vote(s)
    38.5%
  3. 30-39

    26 vote(s)
    19.3%
  4. 40-49

    11 vote(s)
    8.1%
  5. I gots 2 feet, s'all I needs.

    16 vote(s)
    11.9%
  1. Sdashiki macrumors 68040

    Sdashiki

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2005
    Location:
    Behind the lens
    #1
    This is an offshoot of this thread.

    Seems that alot of the discussion leans towards greedy consumerism, and low MPG SUVs.

    So, I ask, how many MPG does your vehicle(s) get?
     
  2. alexprice macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2005
    #3
    If I drive like an old man the 48. Usual speeds 40.
     
  3. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #4
    Between 25 and 26. That's of course UK gallons. Mazda MX-5. So quite a light small car, but an ancient design on the engine so not too efficient. And I tend to give it some most of the time.
     
  4. Queso macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
  5. shecky Guest

    shecky

    Joined:
    May 24, 2003
    Location:
    Obviously you're not a golfer.
    #6
    2003 VW Jetta 1.8t Wolfsburg (manual transmission)

    24 city
    31 highway

    but in reality probably a lot less than that.
     
  6. obeygiant macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2002
    Location:
    totally cool
  7. alexprice macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2005
    #8
    These threads worry me a little.

    Like..

    What does you setup look like
    Whats you job
    What car do you drive
    How many mile per gallon
    etc
    etcetc

    Eventually we'll be able to know too many things about each other.

    On the other hand, its a good way to start a big chat.
     
  8. Sdashiki thread starter macrumors 68040

    Sdashiki

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2005
    Location:
    Behind the lens
    #9
    I just wanted to see if the vast majority of us here, those who care to take the poll anyway, are in fact, gas-chuggin fools.
     
  9. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #10
    I come right in between two options, so rather than voting, I'll simply say I get 29-31 miles per gallon combined, most of the time, in my Mazda6. Which disappoints me. Me wants smaller car *cough tighter turning circle cough* next time around.
     
  10. shecky Guest

    shecky

    Joined:
    May 24, 2003
    Location:
    Obviously you're not a golfer.
    #11
    and out of curiosity, exactly what MPG constitutes foolish gas usage? where is the cutoff?
     
  11. Sdashiki thread starter macrumors 68040

    Sdashiki

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2005
    Location:
    Behind the lens
    #12
    Well, most people seem to think that 30+ is a good start.

    But you wont find an SUV that gets that without going hybrid, so its an odd poll really.

    There are those that think if you get less than 20, you are driving the wrong car.
     
  12. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #13
    You should say "infinite", then! :)

    Let's just say I'm the only person who has voted in this portion of the poll so far.
     
  13. mrcmosx macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2007
    Location:
    rosemead, Ca
    #14
    2007 Toyota Yaris (5 speed)
    35 mpg Street
    40 mpg Highway

    1992 Nissan 300ZX Twin Turbo (5 speed) ( the weekend toy )
    15 mpg Street
    18 mpg highway
     
  14. iGav macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2002
    #15
    65 MPG @ 70mph.
    78 MPG @ 56mph.
    48...ish MPG around town.

    Audi A2 1.4 TDI (90PS). ;)
     
  15. princealfie macrumors 68030

    princealfie

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2006
    Location:
    Salt Lake City UT
    #16
    I don't drive a car. Many US cars are deliberately crippled in their MPG.

    I stick to my feet. Keeps me thin.
     
  16. Benjamin macrumors 6502a

    Benjamin

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #17
    I got two feet but also a bike and a lightrail... however why not 1-9 MPG... for those that own a Murcielago. :p
     
  17. Sdashiki thread starter macrumors 68040

    Sdashiki

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2005
    Location:
    Behind the lens
    #18

    What?
     
  18. ezzie macrumors 68020

    ezzie

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    #19
    i'd walk more if i lived near enough to the store, etc. :(

    2001 honda civic - 38-40 MPG in mixed city/highway drving
    2007 honda fit - 39-41 MPG in the same mixed driving conditions

    since i can't walk everywhere i figure i can drive efficient cars. ;)
     
  19. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #20
    Oh.. you shouldn't have asked. :rolleyes: :)
     
  20. Queso macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    #21
    I hired a VW Golf diesel to drive down to Spain one year. Absolutely amazing how far you get without having to fill up on fuel. I couldn't believe how slowly the tank indicator was moving down.
     
  21. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2006
    #22
    one problem with the pole. The range on the mpg is a little large and it not clear if it is what we average in our own car or what our cars can pull highway.
    Highway I pull 29-32 in my car.
    City 22-24mpg. Normally I get 22-24 mpg but all I do is drive in the city.
     
  22. bartelby macrumors Core

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    #23
    I'm waiting for someone to say:

     
  23. iGav macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2002
    #24
    It is amazing isn't it. :eek: The worst thing is though... *begins whispering in dynamicv's ear... I occasionally find myself trying to better my MPG record that's how sad I'm getting... :eek:

    On the flip side though, it weighs next to nothing, and has a truckload of torque... and has absolutely no problem nailing faster cars in-gear. Weheh.

    Only bought it as I'm having to do a fair bit of commuting at the moment, cost me less than 4000 notes, has a fully glass roof and it'll never rust. :D
     
  24. princealfie macrumors 68030

    princealfie

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2006
    Location:
    Salt Lake City UT
    #25
    July 28, 2005
    E.P.A. Holds Back Report on Car Fuel Efficiency
    By DANNY HAKIM

    DETROIT, July 27 - With Congress poised for a final vote on the energy bill, the Environmental Protection Agency made an 11th-hour decision Tuesday to delay the planned release of an annual report on fuel economy.

    But a copy of the report, embargoed for publication Wednesday, was sent to The New York Times by a member of the E.P.A. communications staff just minutes before the decision was made to delay it until next week. The contents of the report show that loopholes in American fuel economy regulations have allowed automakers to produce cars and trucks that are significantly less fuel-efficient, on average, than they were in the late 1980's.

    Releasing the report this week would have been inopportune for the Bush administration, its critics said, because it would have come on the eve of a final vote in Congress on energy legislation six years in the making. The bill, as it stands, largely ignores auto mileage regulations.

    The executive summary of the copy of the report obtained by The Times acknowledges that "fuel economy is directly related to energy security," because consumer cars and trucks account for about 40 percent of the nation's oil consumption. But trends highlighted in the report show that carmakers are not making progress in improving fuel economy, and environmentalists say the energy bill will do little to prod them.

    "Something's fishy when the Bush administration delays a report showing no improvement in fuel economy until after passage of their energy bill, which fails to improve fuel economy," said Daniel Becker, the Sierra Club's top global warming strategist. "It's disturbing that despite high gas prices, an oil war and growing concern about global warming pollution, most automakers are failing to improve fuel economy."

    Eryn Witcher, a spokeswoman for the E.P.A., said the timing of the release of the report had nothing to do with the energy bill deliberations.

    "We are committed to sharing our scientific studies with the public in the most comprehensive and understandable format possible," she said. "Issue experts are reviewing the fuel economy data and we look forward to providing a summary of the information next week."

    Some of what the report says reaffirms what has long been known. Leaps in engine technology over the last couple of decades have been mostly used to make cars faster, not more fuel-efficient, and the rise of sport utility vehicles and S.U.V.-like pickup trucks has actually sapped efficiency. The average 2004 model car or truck got 20.8 miles per gallon, about 6 percent less than the 22.1 m.p.g. of the average new vehicle sold in the late 1980's, according to the report.

    At the same time, while General Motors and the Ford Motor Company are the most common targets of environmental groups, the E.P.A. report shows that several foreign automakers have had the sharpest declines in recent fuel economy performance as they move aggressively into the truck market.

    The average 2004 model sold by Nissan, Hyundai and Volkswagen was at least a half-mile a gallon less fuel-efficient than in the previous model year, a sharp drop.

    "It's appalling that Nissan, V.W. and Hyundai are accelerating in reverse," Mr. Becker said.

    Kyle Bazemore, a Nissan spokesman, said the company's new large pickup truck, the Titan, and new large S.U.V.'s, like the Armada, clearly affected its overall results.

    "In '03, we didn't have the Titan and Armada," he said. "We've entered into new markets, but we feel we are doing it responsibly."

    John Krafcik, vice president of product development and corporate strategy at Hyundai, pointed out that his company sells relatively few S.U.V.'s but has recently increased its offerings. "Car by car, we're improving fuel economy on every model in our range," he said. "That's a more appropriate way to look at it."

    David Friedman, a research director at the Union of Concerned Scientists, an environmental group, disagreed.

    "The 8.5 million barrels a day that American cars and trucks use have to do with the vehicles on the road, not the model-by-model comparisons," he said. "What matters to our oil consumption is the fuel economy of the fleet on the road."

    Of the eight major automakers examined in the report, only G.M., Toyota and Honda showed increases in fuel efficiency in the 2004 model year, the most recent year for which hard sales data is available. Ford had the lowest mileage of the group. Honda, which does not sell the heaviest kinds of trucks, had the best overall mileage.

    Some foreign companies do not even trouble themselves to follow fuel economy regulations. BMW, in fact, has paid more than $70 million in fines since the 2000 model year for noncompliance. The company has argued that American fuel regulations, which are taken as an average over a company's entire fleet, put luxury makers at a disadvantage.

    "We sell the ultimate driving machine and people expect us to offer them the kind of BMW vehicles they really want to drive," said Dave Buchko, a spokesman.

    Backers of the energy bill have said it will broadly change the nation's energy policy.

    Representative Joe L. Barton, the Texas Republican who is chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, said this week that "it is a darn good bill, and it is going to help this country, and the sooner we get it done, the better."

    Environmentalists disagree.

    "It effectively does nothing to cut our dependence on oil," Mr. Friedman said.

    While the proposed bill, as it stands, does offer limited tax credits for hybrid electric cars and advanced diesels, environmental groups object to extending mileage credits for vehicles that can be filled up with an ethanol blend instead of gasoline; many consumers who purchase such vehicles are not even aware of the feature.

    The E.P.A. report illustrates what has happened as the industry has poured resources into S.U.V.'s, minivans and family-oriented pickup trucks, vehicle types with less stringent fuel economy requirements than cars. The average new vehicle weight has risen to about 4,000 pounds today, from about 3,200 in the early 1980's. At the same time, the horsepower of an average engine has roughly doubled over two decades, trimming four seconds from the time it takes for the average vehicle to accelerate from zero to 60.

    **Yes, US cars have gotten worse fuel efficiency because the auto industry gets kickbacks from the oil industry. Talk about some tech collusion there.
     

Share This Page