How to fix my corrupted APFS container?

Discussion in 'macOS High Sierra (10.13)' started by Mervan1985, Sep 11, 2018.

  1. Mervan1985, Sep 11, 2018
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2018

    Mervan1985 macrumors newbie

    Mervan1985

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2018
    #1
    `MBP late 2011 13` running `10.13.2` on a `Samsung Evo 850 250GB`

    Everything was fine for months but few days ago something horrible occurred. I'm so shocked and urgently need your help.

    Finder wasn't responding and I had to restart it by force. But it didn't boot again and just showed a black screen. Tried several times without success which finally I had to install another High Sierra on my 2nd drive (a healthy HDD)

    • Here's few shots which convince me that the `APFS container` is damaged (SSD=disk0):

    Disk0s2 - part1

    Disk0s2 - part2

    Container

    Weird thing called Synthesized

    Diskutil list

    Diskutil apfs list

    Diskutil repairDisk/repairVloume



    • Here's few notes which probably help you know where the error lies:


    Note1 : Used a third party app and it found 4 partitions including VM , Recovery , Macintosh SSD , Preboot. Tried to recovery data from Macintosh SSD partition and fortunately it was intact and almost all files were healthy and existed. That's why I think it's just a corruption of the `APFS container`.

    [​IMG]

    -------------------------

    Please help me repair the disk and take back the OS. The drive looks like healthy and Repairable.
     
  2. BLUEDOG314 macrumors 6502

    BLUEDOG314

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2015
    #2
    How are you running and 850 evo in a late 2013 mbp? Discounting that, I'd say things are solidly fubar. Manually pull your data and do a clean install. Also....those partitions on that external...did you try to force apfs on the external? I've never seen a drive partitioned like that.
     
  3. Mervan1985 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Mervan1985

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2018
    #3
    Thank you for participating, BLUEDOG314

    It's not an external one. It was just my fault.
    Actually It's late 2011 13inch - I tried almost all forums and the text is just a copy-paste from other forums and tbh never been revised precisely. I had a couple bad days and completely frustrated. I wish you could understand me.

    I've already tried to pull my data from the disk. Unfortunately, I need to gain the access to the OS even for 2min to do sth critical. Then obviously I'd go for a clean installation, for sure.

    What's wrong with partitioning?
     
  4. chabig macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2002
    #4
    There is nothing inherently wrong with partitioning, but it adds another level of complexity that's seldom required on modern computers. For most people, everything they hope to accomplish with partitioning could just as easily done by creating a new folder. In the old days, people partitioned to try to place data onto specific parts of a spinning piece of metal. Drives don't work that way any more.
     
  5. Fishrrman macrumors G5

    Fishrrman

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #5
    OP:

    Do you have any kind of a backup?
    Do you have another way of booting the Mac from an external drive?
     
  6. Mervan1985, Sep 12, 2018
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2018

    Mervan1985 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Mervan1985

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2018
    #6
    Shamefully I have to say no..
    As said above, at the moment, I've installed a High Sierra on the 2nd internal drive (1TB HDD) and boot from that. All above shots are taken within this 'temp' OS.
     
  7. amaze1499 macrumors regular

    amaze1499

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2014
    #7
    Sounds like an issue I have seen too. I took the internal ssd out, booted the machine using an external backup system. Connected the ssd externally and it was showing up no problem.
     
  8. Mervan1985 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Mervan1985

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2018
    #8
    Already tried.

    The disk has a firmware password which can't be disabled. The host windows machine can't detect it due to this bios password protection.
     
  9. Fishrrman macrumors G5

    Fishrrman

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #9
    OP wrote:
    "The disk has a firmware password which can't be disabled. The host windows machine can't detect it due to this bios password protection."

    My guess (and it's ONLY "a guess") is that you're going to have to give up on the corrupted drive and start over.

    One more reason why I will NEVER install a firmware password on my Macs, and why I leave all of my drives (the lone exception is the data drive I keep in my car) UNencrypted and "in the clear". I WANT them to be "easy to get to".
     
  10. BLUEDOG314 macrumors 6502

    BLUEDOG314

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2015
    #10
    Just to clarify, a firmware password and encryption are two different things. Encryption secures the data on your data drive, SSD, HDD, external, while a firmware password essentially locks out use of boot modifiers on a Mac. This prevents things like target disk mode, single user mode, booting to recovery etc.
     

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