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80GB HDD

macrumors newbie
Nov 21, 2020
1
0
When done with everything above, edit the Info.plist at AppleIntelHD3000Graphics.kext/C*
Have to add after VRAMOverrride the VRAMSize key, it will be like this:
<key>VRAMOverride</key>
<integer>0</integer>
<key>VRAMSize</key>
<integer>1024</integer>
I am stuck on that part. After disabling system integrity protection and running those commands, I read and re-read the whole info.plist file and tried cmd f and couldn't find anything to to with the sample in the quote above. After restarting my mac, it still had 512MB vram. Could this be because it is a 15" macbook pro therefore also having dedicated gpu (I doubt it but knowledge is very limited in this subject).

Any help highly appreciated.
 

joel.dbayan

macrumors newbie
Feb 16, 2021
2
0
Terminal command to increase vRAM for HD3000 graphics (Mac mini 2011 or MacBook Pro 2011)

From *MB - The amount of vRAM you currently have. You can find it in System Profiler.

From 256MB to 384MB


From 256MB to 512MB


From 384MB to 1GB


From 384MB to 512MB


From 512MB to 1GB


(Thanks to user Grama for the following tutorial!)
When done with everything above, edit the Info.plist at AppleIntelHD3000Graphics.kext/C*
Have to add after VRAMOverrride the VRAMSize key, it will be like this:
<key>VRAMOverride</key>
<integer>0</integer>
<key>VRAMSize</key>
<integer>1024</integer>

Add these last two lines (VRAMSize integer value should match with the value you picked to edit the first kext, save it and patch and fix the extensions with Kext Utility and you are good to go!
Hello,

My system profiler says that my Graphics hd3000 is on 512mb. i wish to increase it to 1gb. I have 8gb memory at the moment. I am not that confident on using Terminal. I tried the instructions from 512mb to 1gb, but the after the 2nd line it saying operation not allowed or something.

I tried continuing with the other but after the re-start.. it's still the same. I am not sure what to do. I hope someone can help me. thank you.
 

jdmc

macrumors member
Nov 12, 2018
31
16
Do these commands also work for Intel HD Graphics 3000 and Big Bur?
That's an interesting question. According to a search I just did using EveryMac.com, there are no Mac models that came with Intel HD Graphics 3000 which also natively support Big Sur. Therefore I assume in this scenario you'd be using some sort of hack to shoehorn Big Sur onto older hardware. I have Catalina running on a 2011 Mac mini (which, incidentally, has the HD3000 graphics) courtesy of the Dosdude1 Catalina patcher, but I haven't tried Big Sur on it, so I can't personally tell you whether it would work or not.

If I had to guess, I would expect that the technique for increasing the maximum RAM allocation for use by the HD3000 graphics subsystem would work, in the sense that the max allocation would, in fact, change. However, based on my own experiments with this technique in Mojave and Catalina a couple of years ago, I wouldn't expect this to produce a significant real-world improvement in graphics functionality. But I could be wrong, and if anyone reading this has a counterexample to share, I'd be curious to learn about it.
 

desagradable

macrumors newbie
Jul 31, 2020
12
2
hi
for people owning a 13" 2011 mbp and upping video ram .... did it help? Did you notice an improvement in performance on anything?
This is a very old thread and perhaps with it there has already been enough time for those who still occupy a 2011 to realize if in the long run it serves something -or not- to increase the vram.
I stay tuned to your comments. thanks in advance.
 

dr.zeissler

macrumors member
Oct 1, 2018
90
16
For VRAM increase it's not about the performance because it's the same.
It's only about using hires-textures-options in some games that require more than 512MB VRAM.
The max used VRAM is 1024MB, no byte more, regardless what the info shows.

I use 10.9.5 on my 2011 i7 mini. In my opinion best os for that system.
 
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Itz_Arad

macrumors newbie
Mar 16, 2023
2
0
I did this on an early 2011 mbp with intel hd 3000 (macos highsierra).
it did not work.
I turned off SIP then ran the command to transform my 512mb to 1gb.
then edited the plist file , repaired and rebuild caches with kext utility.
idk what I did was wrong. but it stayed the same (512mb).
plz help
 

Itz_Arad

macrumors newbie
Mar 16, 2023
2
0
I accedentaly turned my 512mb to 3mb!
mac is extremly slow and boot time is 2 to 3 or 4 mins.
PLZ HELP
how do I get my 512mb back???
(sorry for my poor english)
 

Kernelkekst

macrumors newbie
Jan 15, 2024
2
0
please help me, I installed kekstbeast and 3 kekst files, reinstalled and my driver flew off and just shows the inscription monitor 64 MB. restoring keks unity did not help, there is no backup copy of the original kext, the brightness does not change and works at the wrong brightness and slows down. Macbook 2011 pro, 10.7.5. i7 8gb 512video intel HD 3000, amd video off. please help me at least return it as it was.
 

Kernelkekst

macrumors newbie
Jan 15, 2024
2
0
Я случайно превратил свои 512мб на 3мб!
Mac очень медленный, а время загрузки составляет от 2 до 3 или 4 минут.
ПОМОГИТЕ ПЛЗ
как мне вернуть свои 512мб???
(извините за мой плохой английский)
You fix it?
 
I am necromancing this thread and also asking the moderators to move it to the Early Intel Macs forum (as this covers multiple EIM models across the MBP and Mac mini.

My particular interest in this discussion related to VRAM allocation and running into what amounts to a buffer overrun when taxing the VRAM bounds.

IMG_1045a.jpg


This is an issue I’ve known about since at least 2012 (and across multiple Macs with the Intel Graphics HD 3000 iGPU), but until recently, I had no ideas or ways to test whether a relative alteration of VRAM allocation from RAM might reduce how often these buffering issues come up.

The symptoms are, in effect, the by-product of running multiple video-related tasks at once. Each time this breaking point occurs, the underlying system is unaffected (and indeed, if one is remotely ssh’d into the offending Mac, load averages are low, and echo response time is quick). What this looks like, however, is a delay of several tens of seconds — up to more than a minute — of screen “frozenness”. Then, for about a second or so, any inputs made by keyboard or trackpad will update/refresh, followed by another cycle of frozenness.

Ever since I first witnessed this back in 2012 (in an early 2011 i5 Mac with 8GB RAM on board), the setup is fairly similar: I’m watching an 1080p video in VLC or similar. Meanwhile, in the background there is a browser running, and possibly Photoshop as well. Atop all this, of course, is Mission Control (or its antecedent, Spaces). I have experienced these overruns spanning Snow Leopard to High Sierra, and it probably is just as much an issue with dosdude1/OCLP installs of subsequent macOS builds.

Although I’m no expert, what this resembles, whenever it happens, is a memory buffer overrun, correctable only by a clean reboot (as even a reset of WindowServer, i.e., by logging out and logging back in without restart, is ineffective). Indeed, the manual screencap of the above — using a physical camera — to show what the console echoes, after this threshold is reached, points to this being buffer overflow issue (and, frankly, probably related to the way Intel manages shared RAM for VRAM tasks).

Whenever this happens, iStat Menus reveals the VRAM allocation for the HD 3000 to meet or exceed, at average, a 25 per cent minimum paired with VRAM spikes which exceed 50 per cent of shared VRAM capacity (or, in exceptional cases, as low as several minutes at 37.5 per cent, or 3/8ths reported capacity). The highlighted time stamp from last day recorded when the most recent of these buffer overflow issues occurred (and is the incident captured above in the manual screen cap):

1707087799942.png


I generally take the specific values, as reported in iStat Menus, to be relative and not representative of actual VRAM values (in MB). But for each instance seen above over the last seven days, all of the above spikes produced the buffer overflow issue eventually — sometimes immediate (as with Cmd-Tabbing between applications whilst video was running) and sometimes delayed (as with watching a movie in VLC whilst leaving the rest of the system alone, not switching apps, making no inputs, etc.).

I’ve come to conclude that once the VRAM demand exceeds 50 per cent, there is a 2:1 relationship of sorts. That is, spiking iGPU shared VRAM demand beyond a reported 50 per cent amounts to 100 per cent demand; anything beyond that can trip the GPU into the buffering issue necessitating a reboot.

So given the above, I see one potential, but substantive use-case for this hack — one I’m now going to test for the next little while and will update after that time.

I’ve been aware from the outset how such a change in VRAM would not (nor could not) have an impact on FPS performance, GL rendering, or other on-screen rendering performance — something which other folks were hoping to get out of such a hack.

Rather, the value in telling the system to allocate a higher shared VRAM share for the iGPU is to give the GPU enough memory headroom to not trigger a literal running out of memory with as high a frequency as it would with a lower VRAM cap.

To that end, I’ve moved the 512MB VRAM allocation on my late 2011 i7 13-inch MBP to, for now, 1GB:

1707088533106.png


I am setting it up in that manner because I also have the system RAM capped at its Sandy Bridge-limited 16GB.

I’ll post an update in a little while, once I‘ve had more time to test this hypothesis. Cheers.
 
Posting an update on how this is going:

The issue with GPU frozenness, when the GPU is pushed, seems to occur specifically when multiple applications, like browsers, email clients, and other utilities have been running for many hours, if not days (as is often the case with the browser). But it isn’t tripped unless one is also running VLC to watch 1080p content in series, such as watching a marathon of episodes.

This checks out with the first time I remember experiencing this happening back in 2012, though at the time the content was probably 720p. It also seemed to take a longer stretch of leaving VLC running in foreground or background before the threshold for the hang-freeze-release-hang… cycle was reached. With 1080p content, that threshold can be reached much sooner.

In the most recent case, I left VLC open in the background whilst working on other tasks, at a time when VLC wasn’t playing any content. But during the evenings, I might watch three or four episodes, in series, before leaving the system running and idling until the next morning. After about five or six days of doing this (this system, after all, has a healthy 16GB of RAM to work with), the tripwire is reached when VLC is either playing a video (or has one paused) in full-screen mode, when Cmd-Tab’d to the background to access other running applications.

This has happened with Snow Leopard, with High Sierra and, as of a few weeks ago, with Mojave. It’s happened with an early 2011 i5 13-inch MBP as well as a late 2011 i7 13-inch MBP. It’s happened when the MBP used an HDD for /Users and SSD for boot volume, and it’s happened when the MBP was all-SSD with DRAM cache. It’s happened with 8GB RAM installed and with 16GB installed. It’s happened with VLC 2.2.8 on up through the VLC 3.0.x builds through the current version 3.0.20. A common denominator across all of them is the iGPU.

Once the tripwire is crossed, I’ve paid especial notice to the iStat figures for reserved DRAM for VRAM use. The tweak I made above, to 1024MB VRAM reserve, does provide more headroom for how much VRAM the Intel HD Graphics 3000 can access. This, however, does not seem to affect this GPU tripwire issue, which I had hypothesized was a function of the iGPU running into VRAM headroom issues. After the tripwire, the only remedy is a reboot (oftentimes, due to the above photo of the repeating message, this means a hard reboot).

So in the end, this appears to be where the HD Graphics 3000 “can’t take the strain” and begins to hang-freeze-release from that point. I don’t know what specifically it is about VLC which overwhelms the iGPU as, at least with the i7 2.8GHz MBP, video performance whilst in foreground doesn’t hiccup unless and until the tripwire threshold is crossed.

It’s a shame the HD Graphics 3000 is well and truly integrated in the literal sense, in that it is, literally, interwoven into the Sandy Bridge CPU package and not, say, a physical, secondary chip mated with the Sandy Bridge CPU circuitry.
 

ricom2ger

macrumors member
Dec 30, 2020
37
30
Interestingly, I have never seen this behavior with my MacBookAir4,1 (11-inch, Mid 2011) which only has 4GB of RAM and 384MB of VRAM. I had this laptop now for 12 years. But I have seen it with my HP hackintosh laptop with 8 GB of RAM and the same Intel HD 3000 iGPU.
 

Amethyst1

macrumors G3
Oct 28, 2015
9,352
11,476
It’s a shame the HD Graphics 3000 is well and truly integrated in the literal sense, in that it is, literally, interwoven into the Sandy Bridge CPU package and not, say, a physical, secondary chip mated with the Sandy Bridge CPU circuitry.
I think this is not what you want to hear :)D) but you could hook up an eGPU and an external display and say goodbye to the HD 3000.
 
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Interestingly, I have never seen this behavior with my MacBookAir4,1 (11-inch, Mid 2011) which only has 4GB of RAM and 384MB of VRAM. I had this laptop now for 12 years. But I have seen it with my HP hackintosh laptop with 8 GB of RAM and the same Intel HD 3000 iGPU.

I’m curious: have you stress-tested the system in a manner similar to the method I find which works? Namely, this means having Firefox, with north of 100 tabs open; an email client, an active utility or two; maybe Word or TextEdit along with Photoshop and/or Preview; and also VLC playing HD video — all spanning, without powering down, for several days?

With VLC being a contributing linchpin, one way to speed up this issue is to make a 1080p rip of a Blu-Ray film in x265. Next, let it run, full screen mode, on single-track repeat for, say, 12–24 hours (to replicate the accumulated time, over the span of a week or two, of watching a season of a TV show, 2–3 hours’ worth each evening). Cmd-Tab, from time to time, between the VLC video running in the background and, say, the browser.

This has been the set of environmental testing conditions which seem to set the iGPU tripwire. With 4GB, you might not need to open as many of these example applications, but VLC running HD, with accumulated view hours in full-screen mode, is key here.
 
I think this is not what you want to hear :)D) but you could hook up an eGPU and an external display and say goodbye to the HD 3000.

Two things:

As memory serves, an eGPU is not something Snow Leopard is equipped to utilitze, via Thunderbolt, correct? Wasn’t that capability introduced with 10.13.4?

Also, this de-facto anchors the MBP to wherever the eGPU enclosure gets plugged to the mains, so that’s kind of a non-starter. At home, I do most of my laptop stuff not on a tabletop or desktop, but on my actual lap in various locations and, less so, with it on a coffee table. Outside of home and for work stuff, this is also a limiting factor.

It is a nifty idea for the sake of knowing it can be done and can be useful for laptops which aren’t going anywhere except a desktop, but unless this were, say, a quad-core i7 Sandy Bridge Mac mini running 10.13.6 or higher, I don’t see it being terribly versatile. It also seems to insist, by design, to have the system attached to an external display to make the eGPU equipment worthwhile.

If only — if only — the issue with sound (and a few other areas of Snow Leopard which are tetchy) on an ivy Bridge Mac could be ironed out, then there might be a solid reason to level up the late 2011 to a mid-2012 i7.
 

Amethyst1

macrumors G3
Oct 28, 2015
9,352
11,476
As memory serves, an eGPU is not something Snow Leopard is equipped to utilitze, via Thunderbolt, correct?
It’s not officially supported but since it works on Mavericks after some kext editing there’s hope (I hope).

If only — if only — the issue with sound (and a few other areas of Snow Leopard which are tetchy) on an ivy Bridge Mac could be ironed out, then there might be a solid reason to level up the late 2011 to a mid-2012 i7.
This would also replace the HD 3000 with a HD 4000, depriving you of any graphics acceleration in Snow Leopard.
 
This would also replace the HD 3000 with a HD 4000, depriving you of any graphics acceleration in Snow Leopard.

If it were doable, it’d have already been pulled off by the Hackintosh community.

That is: decompiling the AppleIntelHD3000Graphics kext binary into an interpolated, generic source code (which no, rarely ever works to approach the actual contents found in actual source code), to come up with a kind of translation shim to help restore graphics acceleration in Snow Leopard. But this is probably superhuman-level problem-solving stuff without access to the original source code.
 
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ricom2ger

macrumors member
Dec 30, 2020
37
30
I’m curious: have you stress-tested the system in a manner similar to the method I find which works? Namely, this means having Firefox, with north of 100 tabs open; an email client, an active utility or two; maybe Word or TextEdit along with Photoshop and/or Preview; and also VLC playing HD video — all spanning, without powering down, for several days?

With VLC being a contributing linchpin, one way to speed up this issue is to make a 1080p rip of a Blu-Ray film in x265. Next, let it run, full screen mode, on single-track repeat for, say, 12–24 hours (to replicate the accumulated time, over the span of a week or two, of watching a season of a TV show, 2–3 hours’ worth each evening). Cmd-Tab, from time to time, between the VLC video running in the background and, say, the browser.

This has been the set of environmental testing conditions which seem to set the iGPU tripwire. With 4GB, you might not need to open as many of these example applications, but VLC running HD, with accumulated view hours in full-screen mode, is key here.
No, I haven´t. Neither have I done so with the HP hackintosh laptop. But with the hackintosh it easily gets triggered (casual surfing, watching films with VLC). I always thought that it is a hackintosh issue, tried many DSDT and SSDT tricks, but with no real gain, so I ignored it.
 
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