If I delete my @icloud.com mail, can I use the same address again with another Apple ID?

Discussion in 'Apple Music, Apple Pay, iCloud, Apple Services' started by SotirisL, Jun 18, 2017.

  1. SotirisL macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2017
    #1
    Hello,
    Recently I created a new Apple ID, through my mac preferences (macOS Sierra 10.12.5). When creating the account, I was prompted to fill my phone number to receive a verification code. This is the so called Two-Factor Authentication.
    After I finished the process, I went on to create an iCloud mail address (***@icloud.com). Having an icloud email address was the main reason I created the new Apple ID.
    When everything was set I signed in to appleid.apple.com, to check my settings: Apple had my phone number stored as a verified phone number.
    However I do not wish to have my phone number connected to my Apple ID (for personal reasons).
    I went to check wether I could turn the Two-Factor Authentication off, but apparently I cannot do that, since I created my Apple ID on a device running the latest (as of June 2017) version of macOS (see bottom of this page).

    So my idea was: If I delete me iCloud email account (i.e. the ***@icloud.com address) and create a new Apple ID from a device that is running an older software, will I be able to use the same ***icloud.com address with my new Apple ID? And If so, could you please help me do that...:)

    And if my idea is not possible, can I at least remove my phone number, or the two-factor authentication from my current Apple ID?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Rigby macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2008
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    #2
    Once you delete an iCloud email address, it's gone permanently (see here). AFAIK there is no way to move an address from one iCloud account to another either.

    It surprises me to see the bit about not being able to turn off two-factor authentication on some accounts. Anyway, couldn't you just change the phone number to e.g. a Google voice number or something? Generally, turning off two-factor is a bad idea.
     

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