iOS 10.3 Beta Says 32-Bit Legacy Apps Will Not Work With Future Versions of iOS

Discussion in 'MacRumors.com News Discussion' started by MacRumors, Jan 31, 2017.

  1. C DM macrumors Westmere

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    #301
    And a different discussion from the messaging one. Not to mention that that's not what they seem to want and not how they really go about moving things ahead based on their plans.
     
  2. smacrumon Suspended

    smacrumon

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2016
    #302
    It's all linked, not a different discussion, unless you're here to guide a discussion in a specific direction. Really poor user experience in iOS this is. Fingers crossed this rubbish doesn't make it past the beta. Good day.
     
  3. decafjava macrumors 68000

    decafjava

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Geneva
    #303
    An excellent port of original DOOM by idsoftware the original makers. The first Infinity Blade game (I have all three). Otherwise I am all for updating to 64 bit...
     
  4. C DM macrumors Westmere

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    #304
    If it's happening then the messaging is better than no messaging. Whether or not it should be happening is separate from that. Going in circles won't change any of that.
     
  5. peter2 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 15, 2007
    #305
    I bought an app that is not even on the app store anymore. Nevertheless it does what it is supposed to do and I don't care when it's not touched by the developer for the next 10 years if it was done properly when it came out. On the contrary, I really dislike very frequent app updates and constant changes no one asked for.

    About the reason why 64 bit windows is able to run 32 bit apps, I think you are completely wrong. In an ecosystem with many more professional tools from third parties than in the Apple ecosystem, the OS vendor cannot afford to behave like a tyrant.
     
  6. IvanX macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2012
    #306
    To each their own there. Many people like when developers push out updates to fix bugs and heed users' feedback in terms of changes. Besides, Apple even introduced automatic app updates so that people do not have to keep checking the app store to reduce this friction. You are free not to update if none of this does not sit right with you.
     
  7. peter2 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 15, 2007
    #307
    How about developers actually testing their apps before releasing them... both for bugs and for features that the users would actually want? I see you prefer being a test rabbit helping to debug products you payed for, assuming they actually work flawlessly.

    Yes, what a great idea, especially in combination with changing the app to the degree when the new version cannot do what the old version could and there is no way to revert to the old version.
     
  8. Tech198, Feb 2, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2017

    Tech198 macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2011
    Location:
    Australia, Perth
    #308

    Yes, but thanks to MR.. :D i won't be there..

    Thanks for not breaking any of my favorite apps... you've just saved my butt.

    Good thing Apple is moving to 64-bit fully, and more memory probably as the reason... (isn't that always the reason?),, developers just may choose to to update apps anymore, or have retired updating of said apps...

    I have some 'Monkey Island 2" fav. Amiga game on iOS re-touched with audio, Double Dragon Trilogy as well.... They are removed from the store, but still in purchase history..

    Users will be either forced to update an app,or forced to look for other alternative which don't fit the bill

    This could either be:-

    * More app develops pay attention and switch their app to 64-bit.
    * a massive decrease in submissions of apps..
     
  9. crashoverride77 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2014
    #309
    And Apple could also still support floppy disks and cd drives.
     
  10. Tech198 macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2011
    Location:
    Australia, Perth
    #310
    Thre is such a thing Apple "could do" and it would affect so many users, but how many people today depend on floppy drives ?
     
  11. sracer macrumors 603

    sracer

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2010
    Location:
    Land of Bongos and Beatniks
    #311
    You are "swimming upstream" on this one I'm afraid. Most Apple customers are accepting of "disposable" these days, disposable hardware (that is glued and soldered into a single unit) so it makes sense that seeing software become disposable would be good to them as well. #shrug
     
  12. crashoverride77 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2014
    #312
    Fair point. However if you really depend on a 32bit app than
    1) the developer is lazy
    2) the developer doesn't care anymore

    It has been like 3 +years since the iPhone 5s has been released. What are these developers doing?
     
  13. applezulu macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2015
    #313
    I see you're still just repeating yourself, but now also resorting to putting words into the mouth of a dead person. I suppose there's some logic to calling on someone who has gone over to the other side to get help in beating an (also) dead horse.
     
  14. smacrumon Suspended

    smacrumon

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2016
    #314
    Not "putting words into the mouth of a dead person", it's an observation based on the past explanations and behaviors from that person while they were alive.
     
  15. gumbyjunior1 macrumors regular

    gumbyjunior1

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2013
    Location:
    'Merica
    #315
    Well someone needs to step up and do something here! I really don't see Apple themselves re-compliling 64-bit flavors of outdated or orphaned apps for developers to keep people happy. And from a consumer end, a lot of people will miss out and get angry. The average consumer is not going to care about 32 bit and 64 bit fundamentals; all they cared about is that the apps they had worked at some point.

    What about the notion of a "backwards compatibility engine", so that way people don't lose out on their apps? Microsoft cared about that and put that in place on the Windows O/S. And if the spirit of security is a issue, whatever happened to "Apple Apps are Sandboxed"?

    And what about the guy who has 1000s of apps? What happens to the amount of dollars that were spent that are now lost.
     
  16. applezulu macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2015
    #316
    Steve Jobs is dead. I can say with 100% certainty that he currently has no opinion on this matter. To say that he does is to use his name without his permission in order to support your opinion about something. Colloquially, that's described as "putting words in the mouth of a dead person."

    If you can show evidence that the man had an opinion against using an OS prompt to warn users about legacy software being phased out, I'll gladly concede my point. If all you've got is your impressions about what he thought about some other things and those lead you to believe he would feel a certain way about this issue, that's still your opinion, not the dead guy's opinion, and you should let it go. It's already abundantly clear to anyone reading this thread what your opinion is already.
     
  17. smacrumon Suspended

    smacrumon

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2016
    #317
    You've taken my comment to the extreme and blown it out of proportion. Based on SPJ patterns of work, Windows-like prompts with a single "OK" button would have been culled at the first alpha. The fact this stuff is making it into beta and final iOS releases is astonishing. It's ugly thoughtless design that gets the user thinking about maintaining their device.
     
  18. IvanX macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2012
    #318
    It's an optional feature and has been an opt-in since it was introduced. Many apps rely on back-end stuff from other providers working properly. In an event that it does not, devs have to rush updates to patch issues and, for users, it presents a seamless experience. You don't have to like it, you don't have to enable it, but venting your anger is best directed at app developers who it seems did you wrong as opposed to this forum.
     
  19. C DM macrumors Westmere

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    #319
    Warnings about something that is coming up are better than something happening without any warning.
     
  20. applezulu macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2015
    #320
    If all you've got is your impressions about what he thought about some other things and those lead you to believe he would feel a certain way about this issue, that's still your opinion, not the dead guy's opinion, and you should let it go.

    "Based on SPJ patterns of work, Windows-like prompts with a single "OK" button would have been culled at the first alpha."

    "It's ugly thoughtless design that gets the user thinking about maintaining their device."

    Oh, ok. Thanks for that. I didn't understand that that was your opinion from the other times you already said that.


    P.S.: I'm pretty sure this warning dialog is from a Jobs-approved era, when he was alive and could have his own opinions. OK.
    [​IMG]
     
  21. peter2 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 15, 2007
    #321
    I am not venting my anger... I do not and never will rely on iPhone/iPad to do anything critical because of Apple's loosing their mind. I am merely making the observation that the direction the Apple ecosystem is going is badly broken, IMHO.

    Yes, you/I can opt out... but my 80-years-old (who is otherwise perfectly OK operating computers but has no time/desire to learn all the small ever-changing Apple quirks) gets a "little bit" upset when his iPhone installs an OS update in the moment he needs it least, just because iOS bugs him EVERY DAY to do so and he happens to unintentionally tap the wrong button once. And guess what, the next thing, the shiny new iOS iteration starts app auto updates without asking! What a feature: say the update starts while you are on a wifi but does not complete. Then you move to mobile data -- the update stops and you are either f****ed with a broken app or you are forced to consume your mobile data to finish the update.

    It's one of those "smart" automations which actually only stand in people's way instead of helping in any substantial way. Apple should concentrate on implementing reasonable things instead -- like sms delivery confirmation (without writing a network-specific string at the beginning of each message)... a functionality that ALL OTHER phones have since the very beginning of GSM. But no, we have emoji, apps in messages, autoupdates and similar non-sense instead...
     
  22. jonblatho macrumors 6502

    jonblatho

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2014
    Location:
    Oklahoma/Missouri
    #322
    The screenshot I shared is of Xcode, the primary IDE for iOS development. Others exist, but the LLVM compiler likely handles it pretty well in those, too, and they tend to be more costly than Xcode's price of $0.00. As long as an app doesn't get into any low-level shenanigans, which I'm not sure is even allowed in iOS (the need certainly hasn't arisen in the development of my first app), it really is that easy.

    If the app submits Bitcode to the App Store along with the app itself, yes (kind of). This is intermediary code which allows the app to be recompiled automatically by Apple as new technologies/requirements arise, without surrendering the actual source code to Apple.
     
  23. briloronmacrumo, Feb 2, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2017

    briloronmacrumo macrumors 6502

    briloronmacrumo

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2008
    Location:
    USA
    #323
    Agreed on this and your prior related points. This reminds me of programs that display ( for example ) warning messages when a button is clicked indicating that an option isn't available. The right design would be to disable the button( in whatever scenario makes that button click wrong ) so the user can't select it thus avoiding the error message. ( i.e. you don't allow the user to choose an unavailable option )
    Apple cut off the developers by removing 32-bit on iOS. I'm not saying that move is wrong but Apple clearly has choices ( for example macOS still supports 32-bit Mac apps almost 10 years after they started recommending Cocoa and 64-bit - they had a choice there too )

    Their approach to notifying users about 32-bit apps is inelegant, and as smacrumon noted, takes users to a place where some will be unsure how( or if ) to react.
     
  24. IvanX macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2012
    #324
    Look, I accept that you have had some undesired experiences in the past. I think that we have all been bitten by such from time time. On the other hand, you should accept that iOS and its ecosystem of devices is not for everyone.

    Trying to get everything right for an age group that spans pre-teenagers to folks closer to a century on this planet is incredibly challenging. And trying to shoehorn Apple into doing things the way 80-year-olds want them done is not entirely fair if it affects the majority -- a more profitable one at that -- of customers.

    Guess what? My old man does not have an iPhone and probably does not one want either. Calls and texts can be easily done on a cheaper and less disruptive handset. And if "all other phones" have implemented features you so lustily desire then perhaps Apple products are not for you.
     
  25. Arran macrumors 68040

    Arran

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    Location:
    Atlanta, USA
    #325
    Good comment. This makes sense now.

    This popup isn't intended for consumers. It'll only be seen by developers - and it's intended primarily for the developer of the app in question. When they load up the OS beta and try to run their own app, Apple's goal is to prod them with this message.
     

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