iPhone 11 and 11 Pro Will Show Warning if Non-Genuine Apple Display is Used for Repairs

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Apple's iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max will offer up a new warning if a repair technician ever uses a non-genuine Apple display when repairing a broken device.

"Unable to verify this iPhone has a genuine Apple display" will show up in the General > About section of the Settings app if a repair shop uses an unverified display component.


The warning message was outlined by Apple in a new support document that says it will show up on iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max devices. Details about the message were also included in the iOS 13.1 release notes, suggesting the feature was enabled with the iOS 13.1 update.

Apple says that the warning is informational only and will not affect the ability to use your iPhone or your display. A notification will be displayed on the Lock screen for the first four days a device is used following the repair, and in the Settings app for 15 days after that before being limited to General > About.

An additional notification may also be displayed, letting users know that Apple has "updated the device information" for the iPhone in question. The notification means that Apple has updated the device info maintained for the iPhone for "service needs, safety analysis, and to improve future products."

Given that the information is added to a device profile of some kind, Apple repair technicians will be able to see at a glance if a display is genuine or not.

Apple's support document warns of the dangers of getting a repair from a non-certified technician using a non-genuine repair part. Parts not provided by Apple could result in degraded multi-touch performance, broken True Tone functionality, unintentional battery drain, incorrect color correction, non-uniform brightness, and more.

"Only technicians who have completed Apple service training and who use Apple genuine parts and tools should replace iPhone displays," warns the support document. Apple says that this includes Apple itself, Apple Authorized Service Providers, and Independent Repair Providers using genuine Apple parts.

Apple in August launched a new Independent Repair Provider Program that's designed to provide independent repair shops with the same genuine parts, tools, training, repair manuals, and diagnostics provided to Apple Authorized Service Providers.

Apple last year implemented a similar warning about non-genuine batteries in iPhone XS, XS Max, and XR devices, letting customers know if an iPhone has been repaired with an Apple provided battery. That feature actually disables the battery health information of the iPhone, which caused some controversy.

An updated battery support document released this week says that the battery warning has also been implemented for the iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max.


On these devices, along with the 2018 iPhones, if a non-genuine Apple battery is used for a repair, users will see a warning about the battery not being able to be verified.

When it comes to batteries, the iPhones pop up the warning even if a non-certified repair shop uses a genuine Apple repair component, and the same could be true for display repairs. Even if a shop is using an actual Apple component, Apple's repair process requires calibration not available to all repair shops.

No functionality is impacted by using non-genuine parts (aside from battery health not working), but Apple could potentially change this in the future. In the past, Apple has disabled some devices that had non-genuine parts, such as the major Error 53 issue that bricked Touch ID iPhones that had been repaired by non-certified repair shops.

Article Link: iPhone 11 and 11 Pro Will Show Warning if Non-Genuine Apple Display is Used for Repairs
 
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kirk.vino

macrumors 6502
Oct 27, 2017
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"Parts not provided by Apple could result in degraded multi-touch performance, broken True Tone functionality, unintentional battery drain, incorrect color correction, non-uniform brightness, and more."
Well, the parts provided by Apple already result in incorrect color correction and non-uniform brightness LOL
 

Pbrutto

macrumors 6502a
Apr 21, 2015
609
1,275
Eastern PA
I don’t think this is a bad thing, what if you buy your phone from someone on eBay who says “never been damaged or repaired” you have no way of knowing if they are telling the truth. This helps keep sellers honest and buyers treated fairly. As long as it isn’t affecting being able to use the third party screen(or battery).
 

Gasu E.

macrumors 601
Mar 20, 2004
4,627
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Not far from Boston, MA.
So much for letting customers fix their own iphones.
How are they stopping customers from repairing their own phones? And if a customer does go to a third party repair shop, as is their right, isn't it good for them to know they have just gotten non-Apple parts put into their phone? Why would anyone honest want to keep customers in the dark?
 

MagMan1979

macrumors regular
May 4, 2015
100
749
Fantastic, I think it's great Apple let's their customers know if they've been duped by these shoddy third-party repair shops who told them "you're getting genuine Apple parts" only to get cheap crap instead.

Still defies all logic and rational thought that people who buy a multi-thousand dollar product would go cheap on repairing it or maintaining it!
 

coolfactor

macrumors 601
Jul 29, 2002
4,738
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Vancouver, BC
Earlier today, Gruber posted that "The US has perfected English". Go find his tweet, if you're curious.

Yet here we have another instance of poor English from a company that cares about quality.

It should read:
"Unable to verify THAT this iPhone has a genuine Apple display."

Am I wrong? Is the word "that" optional in "modern" (US) English?


Edit: found my answer... it is optional in this case, but feels awkward, and lazy.
 
Last edited:

Gasu E.

macrumors 601
Mar 20, 2004
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Not far from Boston, MA.
This irritates me. Apple needs to stop their BS, and let the consumers do whatever they want with the phones we OWN. They’re not verifying anything for our safety, just wanting to control the repair game as well.
Why? If I buy a phone on eBay, or get my repairs done at an independent shop, I would want to know that there are non-genuine Apple parts. So what if this serves Apple-- it also serves me, as a consumer.
 

coolfactor

macrumors 601
Jul 29, 2002
4,738
4,919
Vancouver, BC
I don’t understand the need to lie to users. If you are not actually verifying that it is a genuine Apple battery, then say what you are really verifying.
It's not a lie. Third-party repair shops are unable to finish the calibration, therefore iOS is unable to complete the verification. The message is accurate, not a lie. Did I miss something?
 

Justaguy48

macrumors member
May 2, 2017
64
52
75% of the time when people come to the Genius Bar for display issues it ends up being because of a non genuine display. I’m all for right to repair but if your going to repair your own device or at a third party make sure the parts your replacing aren’t terrible low quality parts.
 

coolfactor

macrumors 601
Jul 29, 2002
4,738
4,919
Vancouver, BC
Found out today that it also shows you how many days left you have to purchase Apple care + . Neat to see more information like that on device, though, I still wish there were in-app shortcuts to settings as opposed to having to go all the way back out of applications. I mean, MacOS has such features..
Yes, that's a brilliant idea. And it may actually increase sales of AppleCare, so they are motivated to proactively share this info with customers.

As for shortcuts to Settings, this is possible. Many apps do it. For example, if an app needs you to enable notifications, it can offer a link directly to the Notification settings panel.
 

jkdsteve

macrumors member
Sep 12, 2006
88
130
I kind of like the warning, even though it seems to be against "right" to repair...it's really an issue for service or a second user scenario.

I'd be happier* if genuine Apple parts were easier to come buy......

* I expect I wouldn't be happy with the price
 
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H2SO4

macrumors 601
Nov 4, 2008
4,668
5,562
I don’t think this is a bad thing, what if you buy your phone from someone on eBay who says “never been damaged or repaired” you have no way of knowing if they are telling the truth. This helps keep sellers honest and buyers treated fairly. As long as it isn’t affecting being able to use the third party screen(or battery).
Could you imagine the number of cars on the road that might pop up with the message, "Unable to verify this BMW has genuine BMW brake pads". That would make a lot of bottoms tight.
 

Gasu E.

macrumors 601
Mar 20, 2004
4,627
2,650
Not far from Boston, MA.
Earlier today, Gruber posted that "The US has perfected English". Go find his tweet, if you're curious.

Yet here we have another instance of poor English from a company that cares about quality.

It should read:
"Unable to verify THAT this iPhone has a genuine Apple display."

Am I wrong? Is the word "that" optional in "modern" (US) English?
It's not even a sentence-- it's a fragment. And it's an information display, so it doesn't need to be a sentence. It just needs to get the information across. That's why we see "Slow Children" traffic signs, rather than "There may be children here; please slow down". Terseness is welcome.
 
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