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The iPhone 13 set to launch later this year will feature the improved WiFi 6E protocol, offering users access to an extended version of the WiFi 6 framework with the added benefit of a 6GHz band, according to DigiTimes.

iPhone-13-Wi-Fi-6E-greener.jpg

Apple introduced WiFi 6 with the iPhone 11 in 2019, and compared to the previous WiFi 5 framework, WiFi 6 offers significantly improved speeds and security. WiFi 6E adds minimal changes compared to WiFi 6 except for an added 6GHz band, which will result in increased bandwidth and less interference for devices that support Wi-Fi 6E.

DigiTimes says that as Apple plans to include the newer framework in this year's flagship model, it will slowly become the standard for iOS and Android devices next year, despite only being announced early last year.
Apple is set to incorporate Wi-Fi 6E technology into its new iPhones for this year, and the technology is expected to become a standard feature of both iOS and Android smartphones in 2022, the sources said.
Today's report also further reiterates past reports that the LiDAR sensor, currently exclusive to the high-end Pro and Pro Max iPhone 12 models, will remain exclusive to those variants. Reports earlier in the year casted the possibility of LiDAR expanding to all models of the lineup; however, that's increasingly unlikely to be the case.
As new iPhones will continue to adopt 3D face ID sensors for general models and ToF LiDAR scanners for Pro series, the three GaAS players will also see their third-quarter revenues further bolstered by VCSEL chips demand for the sensing solutions, the sources said.
The iPhone 13 is expected to be a minor upgrade compared to the iPhone 12, with rumors of more advanced displays, improved cameras, and a smaller notch. Learn more about what we're expecting for this year's new iPhone.

Article Link: iPhone 13 Rumored to Feature Wi-Fi 6E Offering Improved Speed and Range
 
Last edited:

cookiemonster89

macrumors member
Dec 13, 2012
92
93
Of course range is better than speed.

Most people I know don't even have a 5 GHz network and are still stuck with 2,4 GHz.
 

doolar

macrumors 6502
Nov 25, 2019
262
430
I agree. Most people probably keep using their current WiFi as long as it works. Only tech heads are focused on keeping up with the latest.

Me being a tech head doesn’t really care for the latest WiFi speeds. I upgrade my WiFi network maybe every fifth year. And as long as my WiFi speed is equal to my internet connection speed, I don’t really need anything faster, local network is mostly cable anyway.

But still, a new $1000+ phone should of course always have the latest standards.
 

ThomasJL

macrumors 6502a
Oct 16, 2008
875
1,699
Wow, Apple future-proofing for a change. Typical Apple usually releases new technologies after they’ve been on the market for years in other brands, but then boasts how they are proof of Apple’s “innovation.”
 

Eauboy

macrumors regular
Jan 28, 2008
144
23
Washington, DC
Isn't 6E more about short-range speed, not longer ranges? Unless I'm mistaken the 6Ghz band is great if you're near the router, but not much else. Something I'd want more in a laptop or gaming PC.
 

velocityg4

macrumors 603
Dec 19, 2004
6,419
3,393
Georgia
Isn't 6E more about short-range speed, not longer ranges? Unless I'm mistaken the 6Ghz band is great if you're near the router, but not much else. Something I'd want more in a laptop or gaming PC.
I haven’t looked into the specs. Higher frequency generally means more susceptible to signal obstruction from objects. I’d expect worse range.

You also need to factor base speed to loss. For example, 20% of 2gbps is better than 50% of 300 MBps.

Really what most people need is not a single faster router. They need a better layout. Such as hardwired access points strategically placed. To optimize coverage.
 

foobarbaz

macrumors 6502a
Nov 29, 2007
644
986
Good they include it but I think nearly 99% do not have the compatible router to use this feature.
You could say the opposite thing about the new routers. ;)
The only way around the chicken/egg problem is if companies start to push it without customers asking for it …

Personally, I'm very excited about this transition, since I live somewhat close to a major airport and radar blocks most of the 5GHz spectrum. So the remaining channels are super crowded and I can't use 160MHz channels, either.
 
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OhSoSerious

macrumors newbie
Sep 10, 2020
2
2
I agree. Most people probably keep using their current WiFi as long as it works. Only tech heads are focused on keeping up with the latest.
Yes, “as long as it works.” It stops working as more devices enter the WiFi bands or as current devices begin streaming 4K or torrenting; devices that may be your neighbors’. If you are isolated and your internet connection is DSL, 802.11G is likely sufficient.
 
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Luke MacWalker

macrumors regular
Jun 10, 2014
117
96
I hope that with more devices sold hence more chips sold, routers prices will go down or (and) see their reliability increase…
 

827538

macrumors 68000
Jul 3, 2013
1,938
2,298
There’s going to be 7 160MHz wide channels available without DFS.

WiFi 6E is a huge upgrade. Especially for anyone living in an apartment as the 6GHz signal has slightly lower propagation levels than 5GHz and absolutely massive channel width without overlaps.
 
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