iPhone 6, and 6s backplate lcd shield/flex cables

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Buttface, Feb 8, 2016.

  1. Buttface macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2016
    #1
    Hello MacForums, recently i was screwed over by "Error 53" and its issue with touch id on my iphone 6s. I heard replacing the backplate shield which includes the flex cable would solve this issue, although i can't seem to find the specified part for the 6s. The iPhone 6 has tons of these on ebay which are 4.77" inches, i measured my iPhone 6s shield and its the exact same size. If I buy the iPhone 6 backplate lcd shield will it play nice with my iPhone 6s? Hopefully Apple will fix this touch id error, if not someone will surely sue them:rolleyes: Metal-Backplate-Shield-Home-Button-Extend-Flex-Cable-for-iPhone-6-4-7-new-high-quality.jpg
     
  2. Newtons Apple macrumors Pentium

    Newtons Apple

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2014
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Florida
    #2
    You are going to sue someone on eBay if what they sell does not work for you?

    Really?:p
     
  3. lagwagon Suspended

    lagwagon

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2014
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    #3
    Pretty sure a backplate isn't going to solve your issue at all. The issue comes from replaced screens (which include new Touch ID sensors) the new screen/Touch ID needs to be a genuine Apple part and also the new Touch ID needs to get re-validated to the rest of the hardware.
     
  4. HEK, Feb 9, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2016

    HEK macrumors 68030

    HEK

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    #4
    Apple is dedicated to security. Remember all the pundits that were worried their finger print data would be stolen or leaked. Apple prevents this by making the print data super secure in an enclave on the chip so no app or software can touch it. This is of course linked to the ID print scanner. Which would be a way for a hacker to possibly get into the enclave data.

    In order that no one can get at this data even if someone replaces the ID print scanner, Apple links the scanner to the individual chip on the phone. Super secure, even if people try to replace components. It's basically everything security conscious people want.

    It's same kind of security Apple provides for stolen or lost phone that are bricked and become paper weights if people set the password and iCloud lock. No one, even Apple can undo it. You forget the security code and forget your iCloud ID, you are screwed. That is the cost of security.

    So now we have a situation where people get screens repaired using non Apple parts, at non Apple repair places. And surprise, surprise, the phone sees this as a breach of security and becomes a brick. People can't have it both ways. There is no way for the phone to know if the repair is legit, or an attempt to breach the ID security by some hacker after it is stolen.

    I can see where Apple should have disclosed this somewhere in the literature. But I vote for the high security and think people should get the phone repaired at authorized Apple repair using Apple parts. Then the new parts are revalidated to the phone's secure enclave and everything is back like it should be, safe and secure.

    I think it is money grubbing nonsense for people to sue over this. If you are too cheap to get the phone you broke fixed correctly don't blame Apple when it fails to work. Go sue the repair shop and the company supplying cheap replacement parts for not repairing the phone to Apple standards. And Apple is under zero obligation to support fake parts and alternate repair facilities.

    You broke it, you gambled the repair on cheap substandard parts to save a few bucks. Now, you want to blame the company you would have been all over, about selling a phone that wasn't secure and could leak your finger print data. Just plain lame! You were not screwed over by error 53. You screwed yourself over by being to cheap to correctly fix an expensive phone to save a few bucks.
     
  5. ABC5S macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2013
    Location:
    Florida
  6. maxsix Suspended

    maxsix

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2015
    Location:
    Western Hemisphere
    #6
    It's rather customary for large corporations like Apple to employ fear based selling.

    In this case Apple leverages the concept of "security" knowing that everyone can understand that's a good thing. That anything less is very risky.

    Yet the company also acts in secret, it's age old practice. A practice that begs to be questioned. The Apple faithful have been programmed to believe Apple is smarter than them, that only Apple knows what's best and to question that is something only a fool would do.

    So here we are, an Apple power play. Enhancing their locked down Eco System by cutting out third party repairs. Something even the greedy Mercedes and BMW automobile companies don't do.

    Those who blindly trust Apple get their hackles up at the mere suggestion that this isn't right. Yet intelligent free thinking individuals can't get any detailed information from Apple.

    Reminds one of the time when Steve Jobs called a press conference to address "AntennaGate" He gets up in front of those in attendance and with a surly rather acerbic attitude said "you're holding it wrong!".

    How insulting and absurd. He the attempts to condemn other phones claiming they had the same problem. What he failed to consider is millions of us had those other phones and not once had any problems whatsoever.

    That was the moment that after decades, I lost trust and faith in Apple.

    This Error 53 issue smells fishy...
     
  7. LovingTeddy macrumors 6502a

    LovingTeddy

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2015
    Location:
    Canada
    #7

    After 2 articles and 1000 post, you still believe Apple do this because of security?

    I do not believe single word Apple said.
     
  8. lagwagon, Feb 9, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2016

    lagwagon Suspended

    lagwagon

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2014
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    #8
    Yes it's because of security. Samsung does the same thing except on a Samsung phone it disables all Android Pay/Samsung Pay and the ability to use their Touch ID period.

    Looking at Apple's statement on the issue, it appears that their stance on it is that it compromises the security integrity of the phone so it locks the phone down instead of Samsungs's approach of just disabling the finger print reader completely.
     
  9. HEK macrumors 68030

    HEK

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    #9
    I am not so presumptous as to know what is customary for large companies like Apple to base their sales on, but I doubt they sell so many products by instilling fear.

    I have been a proponent of security long before Apple. There are degrees of risk in everything we do. I distinctly remember the large amount of concern many people/posts/articles had regarding the finger print security issue. In fact people were trying to hack and defeat the system with even prizes being awarded. So in my opinion, the security issue is neither false, nor overblown.

    By by no means am I an Apple faithful. Nor am I programmed by Apple. I don't think you are a fool, nor would I be as derogatory as to say so simply because we hold differing options on this subject. If anything, I would note your zeal and passion, which seemingly hold an agenda, in my opinion.

    As to secrecy and closed ecosystems, my opinion is that given the amount of thievery and copying rampant in the electronics industry keeping things closed as much as possible is not entirely an invalid option for a company to take. Which of course begs the question why all other companies don't openly publish their software, designs, and R&D efforts to competitors. After all these other companies are all populated by at least some intelligent free thinkers. Which by your logic makes disclosure just fine.

    I do agree that the statement made by Steve, those years back, "you are holding it wrong" were not conducive to solving the problem. At best were a poor joke, and at worst an arrogant statement which certainly revealed his personality. Though by strict technical evaluation it was a true statement. As crossing the antenna separation lines did ground the signal. In an ideal world, it never should have passed the Development and testing phase that way. Definitely a technical and marketing error which surprisingly did little overal harm to the bottom line. I do wonder about the designer responsible for the missed problem. Did he ever get off the desert island?

    It would never market well, but a good raised antenna would go a long way on improving signal strength and improve battery life for every brand of phone. But we are not gonna see that any time soon.

    As I mentioned in my first post, I think it was an error not publishing that an error 53 would occur if non Apple screen/ID button was used and that the correct part would need to be revalidated back to the chip to restore full functionality. I still don't think Apple should sell official parts or provide how to information regarding this revalidation to the world. As this does open the door for hacking the finger print security. Just as I don't think Apple should provide a back door into the iPhone software/firmware. Some hacker will figure it out. And that I don't want, even if it costs you more for a repair. And no, I don't think you are a fool if you disagree, as I respect your right to your opinion, even if you don't respect my right to mine.
    --- Post Merged, Feb 9, 2016 ---
    Would strongly suggest you not buy any Apple products and sell off any you currently have. As everything they said about their products is not to be believed. Why would you want to own a single thing made by Apple?
     
  10. LovingTeddy macrumors 6502a

    LovingTeddy

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2015
    Location:
    Canada
    #10
    I really only use iPad and iPod Touch... iPhone 6S is in my drawer for most of time. Since I have Moto X Play and Style, I don't use my iPad that often anyway. If I wanted to go iOS free, I can do any time.

    But I am planning to keep my iPod Touch 6 and iPad Air 2. I do not plan buy any newer Apple product. I do not trust a company that brick phone over software update.
     
  11. HEK, Feb 9, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2016

    HEK macrumors 68030

    HEK

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    #11
    I think that's a good idea for you. Be a lot happier. Really you should get rid of iPod and iPad as well. Who knows what lies you are living with on those products. Just word of caution, Samsung pay stops working as does print ID, so may need to avoid that one too.

    Oh and they don't brick it because of software update. They brick it because non Apple parts are in phone, which could be hacking. And phone was serviced by non Apple repair which would have reactivated the new Touch ID to the chip enclave had Apple done the repair. So again could be hacking. The phone checks for that active connection when latest software is loaded. At least get your facts straight. Wouldn't want anyone accusing you of not being truthful.
     

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