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Apple's newest iPhones, including the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X, use a "different performance management system" than older iPhones, which means any performance management features may be less noticeable on these devices.

Apple outlined the difference between its newer iPhones and older models in an updated support document covering the Battery Health features introduced in today's iOS 11.3 beta. Apple says iPhone 8, 8 Plus, and X use a more advanced hardware and software design that's better able to estimate power needs and battery performance.

iphone88plusxbattery-800x611.jpg
iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X models use a more advanced hardware and software design that provides a more accurate estimation of both power needs and the battery's power capability to maximize overall system performance. This allows a different performance management system that more precisely allows iOS to anticipate and avoid an unexpected shutdown. As a result, the impacts of performance management may be less noticeable on iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X. Over time, the rechargeable batteries in all iPhone models will diminish in their capacity and peak performance and will eventually need to be replaced.
Though the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X may be less impacted by performance management features in the future, Apple says that the rechargeable batteries in all iPhone models will eventually diminish in capacity and need to be replaced for the iPhone to continue running at peak performance.

While Apple previously said that the iPhone 8, 8 Plus, and iPhone X do not have power management features installed at the current time, today's updated support document gives us some insight into how these devices might be affected in the future.

Apple has implemented performance management features in the iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, iPhone SE, iPhone 7, and iPhone 7 Plus. As of iOS 11.3 beta 2, customers can check to see if their devices are impacted by processor slowdowns in a new "Battery Health" section of the Settings app.

Installing iOS 11.3 will turn off any current performance management features on older devices, and it will only be reimplemented if and when a device experiences an unexpected shutdown. Customers also have the option of turning off the feature even after an unexpected shutdown, but it will need to be disabled after each performance failure.

For devices that have degraded batteries that are causing performance issues, replacing the battery solves the problem. Apple is continuing to offer $29 battery replacements through the end of 2018.

Article Link: iPhone 8, 8 Plus, and X Batteries Less Impacted by Performance Management
 
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mtneer

macrumors 68040
Sep 15, 2012
3,163
2,689
Good. I wonder if this is because Apple moved their power management chip vendor? In any case, this is great news for people shedding ~$1000 to buy new iPhones.

Also, Apple only says "less impacted". Whatever that means, only Apple knows (at least until another -gate?). Sometimes I have to facepalm at the insane secrecy of everything Apple does.
 

LandRovers

macrumors member
May 28, 2014
34
44
I've had my iPhone 7 Plus for over a year now, and my Geekbench 4 score on 11.3 Beta 1 is higher than when I got it initially. Perhaps it's not being slowed yet, though I will replace the battery soon anyway.
 

falainber

macrumors 68030
Mar 16, 2016
2,768
3,219
Wild West
They're also only a couple months old so the battery hasn't degraded to the point of models more than a year old now. We know most batteries start heading downhill after about a year or 1000 charges.
You still don't get it. Apple just admitted that they screwed up power management design on 6 and 7 models. They were trying to hide it but failed. They will pay for it eventually.
 

kagharaht

macrumors 6502a
Oct 7, 2007
951
422
Believe it not some people have no idea that batteries (rechargeable) batteries wear out in time. They actually believe that after 6 months, 1 year, 2 or more, its suppose to have the same capacity. Seriously people...
 
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loveios

macrumors newbie
Dec 12, 2016
18
13
Norfolk, NE
That's because this is all a cover up for faulty batteries and power management chips that were used in the 6,6s, and 7 iPhones.

No iPhones before these suffered from random shut downs and reboots.

I am sure Apple is not meant to do that! It must have good reasons behind it
 
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ersan191

macrumors 68000
Oct 26, 2013
1,557
2,916
It sounds like the newer phones can predict when a shutdown is about to occur, and then throttle accordingly - instead of permanently turning on throttling after an unexpected shutdown.

I'm not sure why throttling was enabled permanently anyway when they've used this "below 20%" figure a lot, shouldn't they have just started throttling when the battery was at 20% then?
 
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PPopMatt

macrumors newbie
Nov 13, 2015
26
32
California
That's because this is all a cover up for faulty batteries and power management chips that were used in the 6,6s, and 7 iPhones.

No iPhones before these suffered from random shut downs and reboots.

i'm still WAITING for my iPhone6 Battery Replacement!!! It's been almost 4 Weeks since bringing the Phone in for the Genius Bar Appointment, where the battery was diagnosed as Failed, with NO BATTERIES available to fix it!

I suffer everyday from having the Phone unreliable, UNUSABLE. It won't last and needs to be plugged in afternoon to imaging using it in the afternoon or evening. BS It will Show Red Battery, Notify me if I want to go into Low Power mode, and then quickly CRASH if I choose either of the 2 inane options.

There was ZERO issues with my battery BEFORE the iOS11 Update!!

Not Happy...
 

SlasherKG

macrumors member
Jun 15, 2010
83
30
Meanwhile, Android phones don't need to use any "performance management" at all to avoid shutting down.

But by all means, Apple, tell us why this is so "needed".

You're right, Android will simply shut down instead, which is what iOS is attempting to avoid.
My GF's LG G5 will simply shut off suddenly at about 16% battery left.

That's a much better user experience! :rolleyes:
 

BootsWalking

macrumors 68000
Feb 1, 2014
1,527
9,140
It's tragic how Apple keeps up with this charade. The fact is the iPhone 6-series has a design defect that causes the phone to shutdown under peak load when using partially-degraded batteries. This is the only reason they released the throttling logic. No other iPhone model has done this before the 6-series and none has done it after. Yet Apple can't admit this, otherwise it would require a huge and expensive recall of the 6/6s rather than the bandaid of discounted battery replacements.
 

JediZenMaster

Suspended
Mar 28, 2010
2,180
654
Seattle
You still don't get it. Apple just admitted that they screwed up power management design on 6 and 7 models. They were trying to hide it but failed. They will pay for it eventually.

We get it they made a mistake so did Samsung. I don’t know why there are so many pitchfork and torches over this.

Nobody and no company is perfect either and they are trying to make it right.

Sometimes I really with an EMP would come and destroy all of these devices which force us to realize that these devices for some are using them rather than the person using the device.
 
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coolfactor

macrumors 603
Jul 29, 2002
5,231
5,708
Vancouver, BC
This is the main problem...

Apple says that the rechargeable batteries in all iPhone models will eventually diminish in capacity and need to be replaced for the iPhone to continue running at peak performance.

Imagine batteries that don't diminish over time. Maybe Apple will be able to bring this to the world one day? That would be a game changer.
 
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