Become a MacRumors Supporter for $25/year with no ads, private forums, and more!

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
54,475
16,531



KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo this afternoon published a new research note for investors where he speculates about what Apple might do in future iPhones regarding Touch ID and Face ID. Investors, like many of us, are curious whether Apple plans to eliminate Touch ID in favor of Face ID, embrace a dual biometric solution, or swap back to Touch ID once a viable under display solution is available.

Kuo believes Apple's future plans will hinge on whether or not Face ID is well received by the public.

faceidangle-800x644.jpg
A key question on the minds of many investors is whether the new iPhone models to be launched in 2018 will support Touch ID (fingerprint recognition). We believe the key factors are: (1) whether or not Face ID (facial recognition) of iPhone X provide a positive user experience; and (2) the technical issues that Apple (US) will have to address with an under-display fingerprint solution. We believe Apple will replace the existing Home button-based Touch ID with the under-display solution for higher screen-to-body ratios, if it decides to bring back Touch ID.
Should Face ID be well received by consumers who purchase the iPhone X, Kuo believes there's a higher likelihood 2018 iPhone models will adopt the TrueDepth Camera and support Face ID.

Should Apple choose to return to Touch ID as either a dual biometric solution or a Face ID replacement should Face ID not fare well, Kuo believes any forthcoming Touch ID option will be built under the iPhone's display. 3D Touch, though, will make it challenging for Apple to develop an under-display solution.
This is because the iPhone's 3D Touch module makes the entire panel module even thicker, and could potentially undermine the scan-through performance of the under-display solution. If Face ID fails to impress consumers, Apple may turn its focus to the development of under-display solution. However, even if that happens, Apple will still have to find ways to overcome the aforementioned technical issue.
If Face ID does indeed go over well with consumers and makes its way into additional iOS devices in 2018, Kuo believes Apple's Android competitors will make an effort to speed up facial recognition development, boosting manufacturers who supply facial recognition components.

Face ID will be in the hands of consumers this November, following the launch of the iPhone X. As Face ID is a new biometric system, there have been a lot of questions and doubts about privacy, security, and functionality, but Apple's Craig Federighi has attempted to alleviate the uncertainty with a series of interviews.

In a recent discussion with Daring Fireball's John Gruber, Federighi said that once Face ID is in the hands of consumers, all of that uncertainty will just "melt away." The feature "just works," he says. "You don't even have to think about it."

Article Link: Kuo: If Face ID is 'Well Received,' It's Likely 2018 iPhones Will Fully Adopt TrueDepth Camera
 
  • Like
Reactions: Avieshek

Appleaker

macrumors 68020
Jun 13, 2016
2,197
4,191
Well if all models are to get the new design then that is the presumption.
Although Touch ID (once developed) integration along with Face ID is still a consideration, not yet ruled out by Apple.
 

green94

macrumors regular
Mar 17, 2009
229
59
It’s not like they are going to take out, they’ve made their bet on Face recognition. If anything, they bring back TouchID under the display as mentioned. But FaceID isn’t going anywhere.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 0003939

macTW

Suspended
Oct 17, 2016
1,395
1,975
I expect a solid reception. This isn't a gimmick - the amount of modeling and security built into face ID is more than any previous phone biometric system.

Most people criticizing it have yet to use it themselves. They're relying on media members paid not for the truth but for clicks on their website.
 

now i see it

macrumors 604
Jan 2, 2002
7,486
15,135
The 'problem' with Face ID is that it's automatic. You don't have the ability to "bail out" of an authentication process. You will automatically authenticate whether you want to or not.

With Touch ID, you're ALWAYS presented with an option to choose to use it or not. It's never automatic.

Seems to me, automatic authentication via face scanning with no user ability to opt out (if Face ID is enabled) could be abused some way by nefarious operators into duping a user into making a choice they rather would not.

Time will tell.
 

IJ Reilly

macrumors P6
Jul 16, 2002
17,889
1,479
Palookaville
Good lord, is this ever a silly question. Apple would not have released this technology if they thought it had any chance of not being well received by customers. The odds of them going backwards are so close to nil as to not even be worth calculating. The only question that should be asked is how long it will take for this tech to migrate to the entire iOS line.
 

FreeState

macrumors 68000
Jun 24, 2004
1,730
112
San Diego, CA
The 'problem' with Face ID is that it's automatic. You don't have the ability to "bail out" of an authentication process. You will automatically authenticate whether you want to or not.

With Touch ID, you're ALWAYS presented with an option to choose to use it or not. It's never automatic.

Seems to me, automatic authentication via face scanning with no user ability to opt out (if Face ID is enabled) could be abused some way by nefarious operators into duping a user into making a choice they rather would not.

Time will tell.


With FaceID it is the same. When the phone recognizes you, assuming you didn't look away quick enough if you don't slide up the screen to unlock it the phone will auto after a set time.

Edit to add:

According to Apple’s developer documentation, the Face ID authentication dialog contains a Cancel button, as well as a passcode fallback button which is initially hidden and shows up after first unsuccessful attempts.

https://developer.apple.com/documen...licy/1622327-deviceownerauthenticationwithbio

Discussion
If Touch ID or Face ID is not available or not enrolled, policy evaluation fails. Both Touch ID and Face ID authentication are disabled after 5 unsuccessful attempts, requiring the user to enter the device passcode in order to be reenabled.

The authentication dialog contains a cancel button with default title, which can be customized using the localizedCancelTitle property as well as a fallback button, which can be customized using localizedFallbackTitle property. The fallback button is initially hidden and shows up after first unsuccessful Touch ID or Face ID attempt. Tapping the cancel button or the fallback button causes the evaluatePolicy(_:localizedReason:reply:) method to fail.​
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: kazmac and redmac

Marshall73

macrumors 68020
Apr 20, 2015
2,171
2,016
Face ID is here to stay. Biometrics plus facial scanning for app stuff. Get rid of the home button as it was a point of failure hardware wise.
 
  • Like
Reactions: xnu
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.