My Macbook Pro reached 106 degrees !

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by NStocks, May 5, 2010.

  1. NStocks macrumors 65816

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    #1
    I've recently been using a ' heavy ' application on My Macbook Pro 17"( spec in signature ) and I've noticed how hot it is getting. I installed iStat pro and found that the CPU exceeded 105 degrees !

    I checked the spec and according to Intel, the ' safe ' or capped temperate is 105 degrees.

    Why is my Macbook Pro getting so hot, I know that the program ( ArchiCAD ) is very powerful, much more so that Photoshop but still... I can feel the heat on the keyboard and also when I feel my desk ( wood ) it's really really hot.

    Is there anything I can do, apart from using a fan which I already do. Should I call Apple? I'm slightly worried about it burning out completely :S

    Thank You
     
  2. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    #2
    Farenheit or Celsius? If F, that's nothing. If C, it's a little high... but not worrisome.
     
  3. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #3
    Sorry, I forgot to say Celsius. I'm sure it will be ' OK ' but surely if I'm running this program for the next 4 years or so and the temperature are reaching this each day, that will cause some damage or slow-down. ( I've noticed that things are lagging quite a bit too )

    Oh, and I have ApppleCare :D

    Thank You
     
  4. DesmoPilot macrumors 65816

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    Feb 18, 2008
    #4
    not worrisome? TJMax of intel's chips is 105c, sure it won't start melting for another 15C or so; but anything above 100c is unacceptable.

    EDIT: you could try opening up your computer and letting some canned air rip; dust might be an issue.
     
  5. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #5
    I agree ! If it was on my Lap ( which is perfectly acceptable, given the name, although Apple call then Notebooks :rolleyes: ) I would have burn marks !

    I'm not sure if it's worth calling apple because they will just ' repair ' it but last time I had that done it took 10 days and the authorised repair centre scratched it all :(... I need it due to Uni work and I really don't see how they can fix it.


    EDIT : after DesmoPilot edit : Hmm it could be, but I've got an OCD about cleanliness and maintenance with all my electronics... We are ' allowed ' to open up the computer so I suppose it wouldn't do any harm, I'll just need screwdrivers that fit.
     
  6. DesmoPilot macrumors 65816

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    #6
    Like I said, you could try dusting it; or buy one of those laptop fan things? Heard of them on this forum before.

    EDIT: yeah it shouldn't void the warranty; just open it up, don't remove any parts that aren't covered by warranty and let the canned air do its job.
     
  7. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #7
    Yeah I've looked at those... It kinds contradicts the point of a very expensive and sleek laptop though, if you have to attach a £5 cheap fan... Maybe worth a try though.
     
  8. vant macrumors 65816

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    Jul 1, 2009
    #8
    106C is not acceptable. Something is wrong with your fan/heatsink/paste.

    In this case, I'd open it up and check for dust buildup. If there is none, I'll let Apple deal with it.
     
  9. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #9
    OK. I sent the Mac in for repair last week to Group 8 ( via Apple ). The contacted me a few days ago asking what the problems were so I explained that it gets too hot when running ' light ' applications such as word and iTunes. I said that when I use software such as Photoshop or ArhhiCAD the whole computer freezes, when it reaches 106 degrees, at which point I have to hold down the power button.

    I contacted Group 8 again today and they told me it had not being repaired. They said that they ran ' stress tests ' over the weeked, maxing out the cores... The cores reached 107-109 degrees C which is ' normal ', although the ' fail safe' did not kick in which means it did not shut down at those high temps ( note, I asked him this, he didn't tell me ). I said that I needed my Mac to be reliable and working this past month and it had not. They then said the next step would be to stress test the RAM and Logic board as it could be either of those that it is causing the constant crashes, but until they find out which, they will not repair it.

    So, I've being a week without my Mac, and it's not coming back any better. I fully understand and appreciate what they are saying which is they can't reapir it unless the Apple tests come out saying there is a fault. When I receive it, I'm going to see what happens with the same applications and if the problems occurs again I will contact apple.

    I appreciate any advice on this, I'm not sure what Apple do if there service provider doesn't fix the problems...
     
  10. johnalan macrumors 6502

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    Dublin, Ireland
    #10

    I would go BALLISTIC if I was treated like this. DO NOT ACCEPT IT.

    Call Apple customer support, a CPU at 107c is ABSOLUTELY UNACCEPTABLE.
     
  11. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #11
    Not according to the Technician. He said that the figures on Apples ( 95 degrees C ) and Intel's ( 105 degrees C ) websites are ' just rounded up/down ' they don't mean anything really :confused:

    I understand that in order to repair parts, they must show signs of faliure by means of Apple's own tests. Fair enough. But when I tell them that there are serious problems with the Computer I paid for, then I should recieve something more than " The stress Tests came out OK, and that your information is basically worthless" - refering to what Apple, the company I bought it from and Intel, the company who made the chip state.

    I will no doubt see the same problems when I start using the programs I use daily so I will call Apple. You never know, I may get lucky and they will give me a new one :rolleyes:.
     
  12. ReallyBigFeet macrumors 68030

    ReallyBigFeet

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    Apr 15, 2010
    #12
    Back up your data and apps first. Then run your CPU-cooking app plus say a long encoding session via Handbrake for several hours. Do this overnight while you sleep for several days in a row. This may force a system failure and you'll get a replacement logic board out of it.

    Don't do anything unsafe like wrapping a pillow around it to intentionally try and suffocate the device...you'll likely start a fire. Just run it hard and intentionally try to force a failure to meet Apple's diagnostic requirements.
     
  13. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #13
    Sounds 'good' but I will see what Apple have to say/offer first.

    Would doing such tasks really make it fail, or is it because mine is already failing ?
     
  14. johnalan macrumors 6502

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    #14
    I'm an electronic engineer, and I'm telling you 107c is NOT ACCEPTABLE...

    I do believe that if you run it for a few days it will burn out and they will then HAVE to give you a new one under consumer law...

    I would not risk a fire whilst I slept by running that thing hard all night...

    Hope you get this sorted out.

    When you do get a replacement don't feel lucky, you totally deserve it.

    How old is this machine, if less than 14 days you can bring it back immediately?
     
  15. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #15
    I agree, I should get a replacement because they haven't repaired it, which means I have to live with the problems. The point of getting a Mac was to ensure I could be productive... how can I be if they won't repair it and the machine won't output the items I need ( i.e rendering etc. )

    I think it depends on the Apple representative ( telephone, purchased online ) wether or not the give me a replacement. I mean, they will no doubt contact Group 8 first who will tell them that my Mac is 'fine' and has passed the tests. I'm not really sure how I can make them give me a new one but again, I think it depends on the rep.

    The machine was purchased in November 2009 so it's only 6 months old ! To me, this is a unacceptable time period for it to start developing issues, but short enough to warrant a replacement ( at least in my opinion, but that doesn't really matter )

    Thank you
     
  16. dejo Moderator

    dejo

    Staff Member

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    #16
    If it gets to 108, make sure you type the numbers "4 8 15 16 23 42" in the command-line or bad things will happen. ;)
     
  17. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #17
    WOOOOO LOST ! :D :D :D :D :D :D
     
  18. slpdLoad macrumors 6502a

    slpdLoad

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    #18
    Is Group 8 an AASP? You need to send it directly to an Apple repair center, not someone they are contracting out with just because they are local.
     
  19. tatical macrumors member

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    Jun 7, 2009
    #19
    This is really the only thing that I hate about MBP hardware. My MBP [Mid '09, 15" @ 2.8GHz] was running at 105C at max load. I'm sure that your problem was the same as mine: poor thermal paste & bad application. I replaced my thermal paste and my max temp went from 105c down to about 85c. My MBP wasn't freezing, I just wanted it to run cooler because it was noticeably hot.
    http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=919370

    Unfortunately for you, I don't see Apple reapplying the thermal paste if you ask them to (they'll probably put too much on again). If you can't do it yourself, then maybe you could pay someone or a shop to do it.
     
  20. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #20
    Yes, they are an AASP. I contacted AppleCare and they said take to an Apple store or Service provider. I said neither was possible because the Apple store is too far away and I couldn't get to the service provider. They were happy to use the 'Collect and repair' service, so it got delivered to Group 8.

    Group 8 are located 200 miles away from me, so they didn't send it to somebody local at all. I wonder why though... maybe Group 8 are more 'official '

    http://www.group8.com/index.html
     
  21. LedCop macrumors regular

    LedCop

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    Apr 7, 2008
    #21
    How fast were your fans running?

    You could use smcFanControl to manually ramp up your fan speeds and cool down your computer that way.
     
  22. cherry su macrumors 65816

    cherry su

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    Feb 28, 2008
    #22
    Ouch. This sounds a lot more terrible than my first gen MacBook Pro. Hope your refurbished system runs cooler!
     
  23. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #23
    At 100 degrees C there were running at 5500rpm. At 106 C I'm not sure because it crashed and I didn't look at the fans.
     
  24. SonicBoom1981 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 9, 2010
    #24
    Don't you get cold plate things that you put laptops on to intentionally try to keep them cool..? Also, is running the fan constantly at 6000rpm a bad thing? (Not that I'm having to do this).
     
  25. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #25
    Refurb ? I won't be settling for anything less than repairs or a replacement ;)
     

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