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X_LIN

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Mar 28, 2020
4
0
Hello all,

I have a 4TB drive that I have been using for about one year and half. It worked fine until this morning, when I unplugged it after selecting Force Eject and plugged it in again, it shows "The dish you inserted was not readable by this computer". Both my macbook and iMac indicated same message, and my other hard drive was read just fine. So I think this is a hard drive issue.

Now my Disk Utility indicates that this disk is now "uninitialized", and there is no partition map. What I tried:
1. First Aid repair on Disk Utility - said the operation was successful within 1 second of the repair, but it still shows as uninitialized.
2. Recover with Disk Drill - Disk Drill Recover could not get any files from the drive.
Screen Shot 2020-03-28 at 8.53.07 AM.png


If you can help me fix with Terminal or RStudio that would be even better.

I need the files so I am not going to initialize without backing up the files.

Thanks a lot.
 

MSastre

macrumors 6502a
Aug 18, 2014
614
275
Why did you use Force Eject, and did you wait for the disk to finish spinning down before you unplugged it?
 
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jeyf

macrumors 68020
Jan 20, 2009
2,173
1,040
the initial computer that you found the error do a complete power cycle
before you panic

best of luck
 
Last edited:

Fishrrman

macrumors Core
Feb 20, 2009
22,948
8,729
Try this:
1. Power off the Mac
2. Disconnect the problem drive
3. Power ON the Mac, get to the finder
4. Now, RE-connect the problem drive, and.... just wait a while.
5. Give it about 20 minutes, "just sitting there".

WHY I'm suggesting you do this:
The finder -- if it encounters a drive with driver/mounting problems -- may be able to "overcome" the driver problems and then mount the drive.
The only way to know is to give this a try.

If that doesn't work...

I had success on a damaged partition on a drive.
Wouldn't mount, and couldn't be "seen" by disk recovery software.

My solution was not for the feint-of-heart:
I used Disk Utility to ERASE the drive (to HFS+), BUT...
I did NOT use the "secure erase" function
(which would erase each sector on the drive).
I used only the "quick erase" (which erases the directory and updates the drivers, but leaves the actual data "out on the platters" alone).

Then...
The drive could be mounted in the finder, but it looked "empty" -- nothing on it.
HOWEVER...
I could now use data recovery software to access it, and the data recovery software FOUND the data "out there" on the platters, and was able to recover it to a "scratch drive".

Be aware:
With data recovery software, you may lose file names and folder hierarchies.
This is "par for the course" with data recovery, but the consolation is that you GET THE DATA ITSELF BACK.

There are data recovery outfits out there that probably COULD get the data back, but be prepared to PAY for it -- we could be talking thousands of dollars.
 

doctor-don

macrumors 68000
Dec 26, 2008
1,593
332
Georgia USA
Hi, I already tried on my macbook and imac.
[automerge]1585423255[/automerge]

Hi, I did let it finish spinning before unplugging it.

So WHY Force Eject? Was it because you got the message that it could not be ejected because some application was using the data on the drive?
 
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Longkeg

macrumors 6502a
Jul 18, 2014
536
264
The Nation’s (US) Oldest City
The “Force Eject” command should only be used in a situation such as what doctor-don describes. It is not the recommended way to eject a volume on a Mac. It can result in corrupted data which will put you in the exact situation you find yourself. So, inquiring minds want to know... Why did you use Force Eject? Was the disk misbehaving prior to this failure?
 

X_LIN

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Mar 28, 2020
4
0
Try this:
1. Power off the Mac
2. Disconnect the problem drive
3. Power ON the Mac, get to the finder
4. Now, RE-connect the problem drive, and.... just wait a while.
5. Give it about 20 minutes, "just sitting there".

WHY I'm suggesting you do this:
The finder -- if it encounters a drive with driver/mounting problems -- may be able to "overcome" the driver problems and then mount the drive.
The only way to know is to give this a try.

If that doesn't work...

I had success on a damaged partition on a drive.
Wouldn't mount, and couldn't be "seen" by disk recovery software.

My solution was not for the feint-of-heart:
I used Disk Utility to ERASE the drive (to HFS+), BUT...
I did NOT use the "secure erase" function
(which would erase each sector on the drive).
I used only the "quick erase" (which erases the directory and updates the drivers, but leaves the actual data "out on the platters" alone).

Then...
The drive could be mounted in the finder, but it looked "empty" -- nothing on it.
HOWEVER...
I could now use data recovery software to access it, and the data recovery software FOUND the data "out there" on the platters, and was able to recover it to a "scratch drive".

Be aware:
With data recovery software, you may lose file names and folder hierarchies.
This is "par for the course" with data recovery, but the consolation is that you GET THE DATA ITSELF BACK.

There are data recovery outfits out there that probably COULD get the data back, but be prepared to PAY for it -- we could be talking thousands of dollars.

Hi,

Thanks for the suggestion. I turned macbook off, unplugged my drive, and turned macbook back on.Then I plugged in and waited for 30mins, but now the drive is not shown up. Here is what I tried when I could still see the drive on Disk Utility:

1. I tried to erase data, but it shows that "Unable to write to the last block of the device" and could not erase the disk.

2. This is a WD drive, so I went to www.wd.com and download "WD Drive Utilities" software. The software gives me an option to erase the drive. I selected Drive Erase option and it is shown to be erasing files.
Screen Shot 2020-03-29 at 2.02.40 PM.png

But the entire time (when performing Drive Erase, as well as earlier actions with Disk Utility), I did not hear any sound from the hard drive. Is that considered normal for a functioning hard drive? I have seen some said that if it is not spinning, it might have underwent a voltage spike and need to change PCB (Link to the suggested issue: https://www.cleverfiles.com/help/external-hard-drive-recovery.html).

I fully understand that recovery will cost, but if that is the only way to get back the data, I am okay with that.

Thanks.
 

X_LIN

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Mar 28, 2020
4
0
The “Force Eject” command should only be used in a situation such as what doctor-don describes. It is not the recommended way to eject a volume on a Mac. It can result in corrupted data which will put you in the exact situation you find yourself. So, inquiring minds want to know... Why did you use Force Eject? Was the disk misbehaving prior to this failure?
Hi, I used Force Eject because it was stuck for 30 mins when I am running a command and the Drive could not process because the files are too large. It was not misbehaving like this before this failure, but I did use Force Eject once in a while if it is stuck (and unplug it without proper eject sometimes..). I will make a note to make sure I don't use Force Eject often. Any suggestions?
 
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