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Tech198

Cancelled
Mar 21, 2011
15,915
2,151
Dang, so that means if you want them to replace battery, you've got to leave it with them for a month??

I took that as "waiting a month" does not mean your will be without your Mac for for 1 month... If Apple had a laptop for 1 month, people would be freckling out... Most Replacements/Repairs 1 week tops at an Apple Store
 
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Ener Ji

macrumors 6502
Apr 10, 2010
474
342
I was reacting to the remark:
"I'd like to see Microsoft, Samsung, Lenovo, and Asus give the same kind of service... Just sayin".

I just said that they do if it is their fault. A faulty battery is a faulty battery. Exploding now or failing a few years later.
Another example: Microsoft extended the 'red ring' warranty for the Xbox to three years and later extended it even more (this was in 2009). So my reaction still stands: They do if it is their fault.

Batteries are consumable items. They wear out. All batteries do this. A battery needing to be replaced after five years is not a faulty battery; it's completely expected.

My mid 2012 Retina says "Check the battery".
Clicking on the battery warning brings up the help window, the related paragraph says the following (G Translate):

Check the battery: The battery will not work normally, although you may not notice it and even though it is still charging as it usually does. Submit your computer for service. You can continue to use your computer before it is checked without damaging it.

Does this entitle me to a free battery exchange or will I have to pay the full amount?

Probably - check with Apple.

Damn 1 month turn around is a long time without a Mac.

Dang, so that means if you want them to replace battery, you've got to leave it with them for a month??

Why would you have to be without your Mac? There's no reason you couldn't hold on to it and have them notify you in a month's time when they are able to perform the swap.

So people have to wait until November for a free repair, but can pay $199 to have it done now. Is there a battery repair kit shortage or not? They have'em if you want to pay but they don't have'em if you want it for free?

This!

Can't make sense of it myself!

I don't get the confusion here? Apple has some batteries, expects to get many more in a month's time, but might run out in the meantime. To avoid that, they offer anyone willing to wait a month a free replacement. That means fewer people opt for a replacement right now and so Apple is less likely to run out of batteries. That also means that anyone who REALLY needs a new battery ASAP won't have to wait.


Mine says Replace Soon instead of Service Battery. Is it the same thing?

Most likely - I believe that message means that your battery has lost a significant amount of its charge capacity, which in the past has qualified for a replacement.
 

dlondon

macrumors 6502
Sep 6, 2013
413
326
Damn 1 month turn around is a long time without a Mac.

You'll need to take the MacBook Pro in to confirm eligibility for the program. They'll order the part but you can take the device back in the meantime. When the part arrives, you'll need to bring the device back to the store and leave it with them for 3-7 days.
 
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biffuz

macrumors 6502
Feb 23, 2016
343
337
This isn't a surprise - those machines are still great, and newer ones offers so little advantages - or even disavantages - that a lot of people prefers getting them a new battery instead of replacing them. In fact, my late '13 is starting to have battery issues, I guess I'll have to replace it in a year or so.
 

djs

macrumors newbie
Nov 26, 2009
15
6
I just called about getting the battery replaced (I had logged issues with it on a case id anyway). I didn't even get to asking about price or ETA of parts - they said to bring it into a repair centre and anything they find will be fixed free of charge under the UK consumer law :eek:
I'm thinking this is too good to be true and half expecting them to laugh at me when I go into the repair centre. But if this works, then it somewhat justifies the UK paying extra for Apple products.

As a side note. I had taken the Macbook into a repair centre last week for diagnostics for battery and the "video issues", so this was logged on the system
 

danthedj

macrumors newbie
Jul 8, 2011
13
5
NYC
Just came back from the Apple Store (in the US) a few minutes ago. Genius originally told me the parts weren't constrained, that it'd just take 3-5 days for it to come in. He walked away for a minute or two and when he came back told me that he was wrong, the parts were still constrained and if I wanted to wait until Nov 15th (or later) the repair would be free. And to the person wondering if they'd be keeping your Mac for the month, no, there's no reason for them to want to hang onto it for a month and for you to be without it.
 
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BaggieBoy

macrumors 6502a
May 29, 2012
658
349
UK
My 2012 15" rRMP has had the "Service Battery" status for ages (65% health with around 770 cycles). I might take it in and see if they will replace battery for free.
 
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haruhiko

macrumors 604
Sep 29, 2009
6,551
5,896
My 2012 rMBP's battery status still shows normal... and I only have 20 cycles on it :D
 

AndyMacAndMic

macrumors 65816
May 25, 2017
1,084
1,632
Western Europe
Batteries are consumable items. They wear out. All batteries do this. A battery needing to be replaced after five years is not a faulty battery; it's completely expected.

The fact that batteries are consumable items is besides the point in this case. Apple is admitting they have an issue replacing/repairing them. That is the reason why they offer this service for free. If everything would be hunky-dory they would not do this in the first place. My point is that every self-respecting company (when they admit it is their fault) will try to solve this in a customer-friendly way.
 
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SteveJobzniak

macrumors 6502
Dec 24, 2015
489
780
I don’t get why they were glueing them in a way that basically wrecks the computer when replaced. I like the way they did the batteries for the air. They were screwed in and replaceable.

The whole make nothing serviceable kinda sucks. I have a 2012 MacBook Pro and love the fact that ram and hard drive,battery and dvd drive were all accessible and easily replaceable.

Great point. I thought they used space-station level glue just to prevent regular weak glue gradually coming loose due to heat and then rattling with time...

But your idea of just having 4 screw hole posts per battery corner and screwing them in makes more sense and would have given the same level of security against rattling, while being totally repairable.

F- ing Apple... Somehow they have a huge team of hardware engineers and tester and nobody made sure to say "Uh... let's NOT use space-glue on a freaking degradeable component that must be replaced every 1-3 years?!".

I think this was literally upper management going: Well, if it's glued and costs $200 to replace, perhaps they will just trade their dead laptop in to us (so we can refurbish it and re-sell it and make more money from selling it again) and then they'll use that small trade-in credit plus the $200 they saved (by avoiding the battery repair) to buy a NEW model instead... so we can keep fleecing our sheep, instead of letting them keep enjoying their current laptops for years.

Sounds extreme? No. That's literally the only conceivable reason why they shipped laptops with space-glued batteries. User-nonreplaceable by design.

Thankfully iFixit came up with a glue dissolver kit:


Thanks iFixit.
 
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Glassed Silver

macrumors 68020
Mar 10, 2007
2,096
2,567
Kassel, Germany
My 2011 17" is irreplaceable. I damn sure would NOT want a TB MBP to replace it.

Coincidentally, after 6 years I just replaced the battery with a OWC Newer Tech one.

So, it'll keep my baby alive that much longer. SSD prices are coming down too, so that'll be next: 2 SSDs in RAID 0. I'd already maxed RAM out.

Can't do ANY of this, on ANY portable Mac, since 2012.

SAD.
2011 was the zenith for Mac in my books, that's for damn sure.

Lack of USB 3 and Nvidia GPU aside my mid-'11 iMac is a hell of a machine after I added a Samsung 1TB SSD.

It's such a shame that I cannot justify adding a Macbook to the mix, I'd love to.

Glassed Silver:ios
 

krdetroit

macrumors newbie
Mar 13, 2013
6
19
I took my wife's and my rMBP Late 2012 and Early 2013 in a week before the program ended for the swap and it took about an hour with a Mac Genius all together and they tested the batteries. My wife's 2012 fell under the percentage of I think was 70% (69%) so they authorized a swap for a brand new 2017! It took about a week for them to authorize but yeah... Mine (2013) hit at 72% so it didn't make the cutoff but the Apple rep said to run it night and day and bring it back in a week or so when it gets under 70%. Alas the program ended. I'm at 59% right now so hopefully if I go in they will hook up a new battery to at least help with the resale of the machine.
 

HeartMan

macrumors newbie
Mar 8, 2011
8
11
La Vista NE, USA
I took my 2013 MBP into the local Apple Store yesterday after seeing this article as I've been having trouble with my battery. The Genius Bar dude was pretty rude - I showed him the article and he said "not true, it's a "rumor" site"! He showed me his iPad and it had no information on battery replacement that agreed with the story. It bothered me a little that he had never heard of Mac Rumors... So he did the internal test thing on my MBP and my battery came up as faulty. I said I want to get it replaced either way so he started punching stuff into his iPad. As he was finishing up, my work order refreshed and lo and behold - batteries/unibodies were out of stock until at least 11/15/17 but no further information. I couldn't even make a Genius Bar appointment to bring it back. He said just make one for after that date and everything should work out. I got on Apple's web site when I got home but you can only make appts for 7 days into the future? Weird. At any rate, he said yesterday's visit was attached to my account so there shouldn't be any questions. I just smiled at him when I walked away...
 

danthedj

macrumors newbie
Jul 8, 2011
13
5
NYC
I took my 2013 MBP into the local Apple Store yesterday after seeing this article as I've been having trouble with my battery. The Genius Bar dude was pretty rude - I showed him the article and he said "not true, it's a "rumor" site"! He showed me his iPad and it had no information on battery replacement that agreed with the story. It bothered me a little that he had never heard of Mac Rumors... So he did the internal test thing on my MBP and my battery came up as faulty. I said I want to get it replaced either way so he started punching stuff into his iPad. As he was finishing up, my work order refreshed and lo and behold - batteries/unibodies were out of stock until at least 11/15/17 but no further information. I couldn't even make a Genius Bar appointment to bring it back. He said just make one for after that date and everything should work out. I got on Apple's web site when I got home but you can only make appts for 7 days into the future? Weird. At any rate, he said yesterday's visit was attached to my account so there shouldn't be any questions. I just smiled at him when I walked away...

Probably not the best way to approach the situation. Walking into the store and saying "hey I heard I can get this service for free on the internet so you should make it happen" definitely isn't going to make them want to help you. I walked in, played the part of normal customer wanting to see how much it'd cost to replace my battery and everything worked out perfectly.
 
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BaggieBoy

macrumors 6502a
May 29, 2012
658
349
UK
I've made an appointment to have my rMBP looked at, so in preparation I put the original 512GB SSD back in (been using a Transcend for a while) and installed the OS from scratch, via internet recovery. So I ended up with OSX Lion when it completed, battery status was still "Service Battery". I then updated to High Sierra (via Mountain Lion) and now the battery status has reverted to "Normal". I pulled the original SSD and put the Transcend one back and now it's "Service Battery" again.

I'm assuming that the status got reset at some point during the installs and the clean install hasn't yet detected the true state of the battery.
 

tivoboy

macrumors 601
May 15, 2005
4,022
826
so, can this still be done or not? Is it totally YMMV? I can't get a local GB appointment for a MBP issue for about a week,
 

ManateeDawn

macrumors newbie
Oct 15, 2017
1
0
I tried this at one of my local Apple Stores (in US), but they only offered me the option to either send out my MacBook for repair or have the part ordered to the store. When I asked how long the options would take, they said I'd either have to send my MacBook out for a week or have the part shipped to the store in 2-3 days and leave my MacBook with them at the store. No mention of the part being constrained or about any free replacement in November. Do I have to commit and say that I will order the battery for the constrained noticed to pop-up?
 

Ener Ji

macrumors 6502
Apr 10, 2010
474
342
The fact that batteries are consumable items is besides the point in this case. Apple is admitting they have an issue replacing/repairing them. That is the reason why they offer this service for free. If everything would be hunky-dory they would not do this in the first place. My point is that every self-respecting company (when they admit it is their fault) will try to solve this in a customer-friendly way.

Maybe I missed something, but I don't think there is a fault here. The service costs the usual $199 for people who want it right away. It's only free (temporarily) for people who choose to wait, due to supply constraints. That strikes me as pretty customer-friendly to me.

Again, maybe I'm missing something - can you point to any evidence of Apple making an exception because of a design defect or similar issue?
[doublepost=1508126220][/doublepost]
Great point. I thought they used space-station level glue just to prevent regular weak glue gradually coming loose due to heat and then rattling with time...

But your idea of just having 4 screw hole posts per battery corner and screwing them in makes more sense and would have given the same level of security against rattling, while being totally repairable.

F- ing Apple... Somehow they have a huge team of hardware engineers and tester and nobody made sure to say "Uh... let's NOT use space-glue on a freaking degradeable component that must be replaced every 1-3 years?!".

I think this was literally upper management going: Well, if it's glued and costs $200 to replace, perhaps they will just trade their dead laptop in to us (so we can refurbish it and re-sell it and make more money from selling it again) and then they'll use that small trade-in credit plus the $200 they saved (by avoiding the battery repair) to buy a NEW model instead... so we can keep fleecing our sheep, instead of letting them keep enjoying their current laptops for years.

Sounds extreme? No. That's literally the only conceivable reason why they shipped laptops with space-glued batteries. User-nonreplaceable by design.
<snip>

That's a nice conspiracy theory, and I'm sure it crossed someone's mind at Apple, but it's definitely not the only reason, or, IMHO, even the main reason.

The real reason Apple has gone to glued batteries is the pursuit of thinness. Removable covers add thickness. The entire phone industry has ditched swappable batteries, and phone batteries tend to wear out even faster than notebook batteries. In the portable PC space, note that several other manufacturers competing in premium / ultra-sleek categories where thinness is particularly prized have also moved towards non-swappable batteries in recent years, some of them also using glue.
 

SteveJobzniak

macrumors 6502
Dec 24, 2015
489
780
I've made an appointment to have my rMBP looked at, so in preparation I put the original 512GB SSD back in (been using a Transcend for a while) and installed the OS from scratch, via internet recovery. So I ended up with OSX Lion when it completed, battery status was still "Service Battery". I then updated to High Sierra (via Mountain Lion) and now the battery status has reverted to "Normal". I pulled the original SSD and put the Transcend one back and now it's "Service Battery" again.

I'm assuming that the status got reset at some point during the installs and the clean install hasn't yet detected the true state of the battery.

You should research cloning your 3rd party SSD contents to your stock SSD. That way the service battery logs would remain. :)
[doublepost=1508131956][/doublepost]
That's a nice conspiracy theory, and I'm sure it crossed someone's mind at Apple, but it's definitely not the only reason, or, IMHO, even the main reason.

The real reason Apple has gone to glued batteries is the pursuit of thinness. Removable covers add thickness. The entire phone industry has ditched swappable batteries, and phone batteries tend to wear out even faster than notebook batteries. In the portable PC space, note that several other manufacturers competing in premium / ultra-sleek categories where thinness is particularly prized have also moved towards non-swappable batteries in recent years, some of them also using glue.

A laptop is not a phone. Glue is insane in a laptop battery.

Since their battery cells are custom designed, they could at last have used a soft glue plus 2 little round holes in each top corner of the cells, to screw two corners per cell into the case. It would not add thickness, would not rattle, and it would be cheaply replaceable.

It is clear they did not have any incentive for "cheaply replaceable".
 
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AndyMacAndMic

macrumors 65816
May 25, 2017
1,084
1,632
Western Europe
Maybe I missed something, but I don't think there is a fault here. The service costs the usual $199 for people who want it right away. It's only free (temporarily) for people who choose to wait, due to supply constraints. That strikes me as pretty customer-friendly to me.

Again, maybe I'm missing something - can you point to any evidence of Apple making an exception because of a design defect or similar issue?

I said: "Apple is admitting they have an issue replacing/repairing them. That is the reason why they offer this service for free". The issue/fault is in this case indeed 'supply constraints'. I never said it was a design defect (but the glue certainly does not help). Why should I point you to any evidence if we already both have established Apple has an issue (due to a shortage and the gluing)? Or am I missing something now?
 
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foidulus

macrumors 6502a
Jan 15, 2007
904
1
I wonder if I can get a discount on replacing a faulty keyboard under this program, since most of the cost of replacing a keyboard is the case.
 
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